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Yoked Blouse

Blouses come in all shapes and styles. Be it slim-fit or loose, feminine or ultra-strict, a blouse is a smart choice for any occasion. Our Yoked Blouse Sewing Pattern is a version of a classic. With a lace-trimmed yoke and translucent details, this style works best for a romantic look.

yoked blouse sewing pattern features chiffon inserts

The model blouse is made with stripe-patterned cotton, and a slightly elastic chiffon. With the combination of elastic and non-elastic materials, this style is comfortable to wear. The upper part of the sleeve is made with elastic fabric, which makes certain that the garment won’t feel constricting when worn. The elastic chiffon allows movement though the shape of the upper sleeve is quite narrow.

The seams on the sleeves are hidden with satin ribbon, and the cuff is trimmed with the same material. This gives the blouse a polished, fully finished look. The satin embellishment also adds a little shine, bringing a very subtle touch of bling to the style. You can also use lace to hide the seams and to trim the cuffs with.

 yoked-blouse-sleeve-detail

This style has a relatively long hem. It is a little shorter in the front, and curves down in the back. The fit is loose, so that the blouse is comfortable to wear. You can shape the waist by simply adding darts to the back. The style is designed for petite beauties, and comes only in sizes 32-38.

With a chiffon insert at the yoke, the blouse bears a Victorian vibe. The model blouse is made with ordinary buttons, but by choosing a more extravagant design, you can easily add drama to this style. Try wearing a brooch at the collar of this blouse, or add a waist corset to the mix. This classic style also works well with jeans or even mini skirts.

yoked-blouse-collar-detail

I hope you’ll enjoy our Yoked Blouse Sewing Pattern!

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

yoked blouse sewing pattern

Let’s Make… Add Ruffles to Blouse

Once upon a time, I had a short sleeved blouse. An ordinary blouse made with stretchy fabric. It was comfy, but getting a bit old and having a mid-life crisis. Much like its owner. It was pretty much the right size, all that really needed doing was adjusting darts on the back.
But I wanted to make it less ordinary. So I decided to do the good old “add ruffles to blouse” -trick.
I took a long strip of fabric that tinted quite a lot towards blue, and cut it into four pieces.
I shaped the strips, and did a rolled hem on one of the long sides on each strip.
I pinned the strips to the front of the blouse, rouching them a little as I went a long. I sewed them on, snapped a picture, GIMPed it, and then my computer ate it. Very impolite on its part.
I left a gap between the ruffle and the button list.
… so that I’d have room for another layer. I pinned the second pair of ruffles onto the front, hiding one of the raw edges under the button list.
The other side was made differently, so I hid the edge of the ruffle with satin ribbon.
After sewing the ribbon on, it made a nice little detail.
And that was all it took. The blouse turned from meh to fun, and now I can’t wait to wear it again!
For the pictures, I paired the blouse with pants, but it works well with long skirts and corsets as well.
The ruffles give the blouse a feminine touch, and make it different in a very subtle way.
This trick works for all kinds of blouses. Try adding patterned materials, or making many narrow rows of ruffles with different fabrics!
Until next Wednesday.
Love,
Heather

Let’s Make… Boring Tee to Cool Top

Once upon a time, there was a T-shirt.
Now I’m not much of a T-shirt -person. There’s something I can’t put my finger on that makes me uncomfortable when wearing one.
Naturally, T-shirts are very common, and many find their way to me.
I see it as my sworn duty to give each one a makeover.
This Tee had a girly skull print. I liked it, and wanted to turn the Tee a bit more feminine. It was an almost perfect fit, so I didn’t need to take it in at the sides.
I started by folding the Tee with side seams facing. I cut off the collar and the sleeves, leaving a deep V-neck and a low rise back.
The easiest way to do this is to first cut off the sleeves, and then open the shoulder seams. After that, it’s much easier to get the Tee to lie flat on a surface. After, take any backless top, fold it accordingly, and use it as a pattern to find the right length for the back piece. The neckline is best shaped while trying the top on. You can cut it super low, or leave it higher for more coverage.
When opening the fold, I got a backless V-neck top.
Which naturally needed something.
I measured the distance from shoulder to back, and covered it with elastic band. I didn’t cut it, but used the same length of elastic to bind the back of the top. I left another bit of elastic to the other shoulder. These would later be used as straps. I used ordinary elastic band, since I’d accidentally ran out of all the nicer kinds. Elastic lace will look pretty as straps, too.
I bound the neckline with narrow elastic lace.
 I added two more straps to each shoulder, so that I had three pairs. I would have added some elastic lace to the straps, but, well, I ran out of that as well.
 I attached the straps to the back piece. As an afterthought, it might have been a good idea to make the straps cross each other… that would have given me a trendy cage-detail.
 The transformation didn’t take long, but did wonders to an ordinary Tee!
The top turned out nice and comfy, and with a subtle skull print, I can wear it without feeling like an exclamation point. Next time I do this, I’ll add an extra pair of straps (or two) and see how much fun can be had with crossing them!
Until next Wednesday.
Love,
Heather