Tag Archives: skirts

Birthday Outfit

Last week’s theme was quite Victorian. We’ll continue in the same direction today as I’ll finally show you my finished taffeta skirt. I made the skirt for my Birthday, and intended to wear it for my party. Weather, as it turned out, had a different opinion about my plans. The day was hot and humid, and after getting dressed and gotten photos taken, I changed into something else. A long jersey dress with lace inserts was a much more comfortable choice, but I still felt super-warm all day.

I made the taffeta skirt with the help of our Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial. I altered the original style a bit. My skirt only has one layer, and no ribbon channels for hitching up the hem. The skirt is still pretty, and likes many kinds of tops.

For my Birthday, I paired it up with a lace blouse and a waist corset.

The lace blouse is store-bought. I got it from a flea market with its tags cut off, so I can’t tell you who made it. It’s lovely, though, with wide ruffles at the cuffs and a very high collar. It’s made with elastic lace, so it’s comfy, too.

The corset is hand-made. It’s a prototype of our Reversible Waist Corset, actually. I made the black satin corset with purple lining and bone channels, and a criss-cross button closure at the front. The back has a lacing and a modesty panel, so this one works wonderfully with skirt-blouse -combos. The chains on the corset can be removed: they have clasps, and attach to little loops sewn into the seams.

For some reason, I don’t own a lot of jewelry. I guess I’ve always concentrated more on clothing. These pieces are my favorites, though, and I wear them often. I got the ankh when I was 14 or so, and it bears a lot of sentimental value. The pearls I bought a few years back, and they quickly became my trusted companions.

I like the way they go with this particular blouse. The ankh obscures the button list a bit (when it’s not hiding inside it, next time I’ll remember to check photos more closely!) and the pearls give the blouse a bit more femininity.

I really liked this outfit, and it would have been perfect for the party. I’ve probably mentioned that summer isn’t a very good time to dress Victorian! Let’s hope I’ll get to wear this some other time.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Two Victorian Skirt Styles

On Tuesday, I showed you sneak peaks of a skirt I made for my Birthday. My black taffeta skirt is all done, but I’ll share it fully next week. Today, I wanted to share two outfits based on another skirt.

My taffeta skirt was made with the help of our Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial. I made mine with only one layer, and without the option to wear it hitched up. I have, however, made a full version of the Victorian Skirt, and it’s one of my favorite styles. The skirt is pretty and versatile, and I feel comfortable in it. It’s one of my go-to -garments that both look and feel like Me.

The Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial isn’t a pattern, and does not come with one. Instead, it will help you to draft your own pattern for your own measurements. It also comes with a fully illustrated sewing tutorial.

The skirt looks complicated, and can feel intimidating to make, but trust me,  it’s really super-easy!

Wearing this skirt is also easy. Despite the Victorian vibe that practically cries for a corset, the skirt actually likes casual tops, too.

Wrap-Cut Top with Victorian Vibe

Summer calls for lighter outfits, but it’s difficult to lighten a Gothic style. RomantiGoths have a pretty hard time during the warm season: layers of long hems and blouses and corsets can make us very uncomfortable. Popping on a black sundress and just saying F**k This to image is a perfectly acceptable option (I do it all the time) but sometimes it’s nice to go for a more distinct look. I wanted to create a summer style based on The Victorian Skirt.

I made this skirt with polyester satin, so it’s pretty hot during the summer. Using light cotton will make this skirt cooler to wear on warm days. It will look lovely made with cotton, but comfort-level will increase big time. To show you that the skirt doesn’t need to be worn with a corset, I paired it with the orange version of our Wrap-Cut Top. The asymmetric hem and lace create an interesting opposite to the romantic hems. The sleeveless top makes the outfit cool and comfy.

I added black pearls and bangles to this style. I wanted to concentrate on just two colors, and hesitated introducing a third one as jewelry. A two-toned style is elegant in an easy way.

Summer days are often sunny, and going out like this terrifies me. Getting a tan is not an option! When venturing out, I would add a sun hat (black, of course) or a parasol. And of course loads of sunblock!

The Secretary

Introducing masculine elements to feminine outfits is both popular and fun. I like to call this style the Secretary-look. This look works even better with a pencil skirt. Personally, I don’t feel comfortable in them, but they do look super-cute on everyone else.

The Secretary-look is easily achieved by pairing up a fitted blouse, a black tie, and a waist corset. A neat bun increases the effect of this style even further.

I chose to wear this with The Victorian Skirt because this is one of my signature styles. I love this outfit, and would wear it to a party any day.

But with socks and different shoes! Today was suffocatingly warm, and I could not face wearing socks with this skirt.

The Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial will be our VIP-offer for the next two weeks. On Tuesday, I’ll show you what I decided to pair my new skirt with for my B-Day party!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Black Taffeta Skirt

It’s my Birthday next Monday and to celebrate, I’ll be hosting a small party on Saturday. These two things combined meant that I needed a new skirt. I had some taffeta stashed, and since this is a pretty big Even Number -thing, it felt OK to sew a skirt with a nicer fabric. I decided to show you only sneak peaks of my black taffeta skirt today. It’s all wrinkly and needs a wash before  it can be worn. I want to wear in on Saturday, so I’ll showcase an outfit based on it next Tuesday.

Taffeta sounds super-fancy, and it can be that. When you think of taffeta, you probably see a starched evening gown that rustles softly on a red carpet. Taffeta is a twisted-woven fabric type which can be made with fibers varying from silk to polyester. A high-quality taffeta is made with natural fibers, and suitable for wedding dresses. My skirt is made with a “yeah, just going to a Goth-gig” -grade polyester. It has a lovely shine to it, but at 4€/meter, I wouldn’t be caught dead going to a proper party in this.

For my “Friends Only and To The Pub Later” -B-Day it’s perfect, though. I’m very likely to get champagne spilled on me, and this won’t mind.

On my Birthdays, I tend to make a point of wearing something that both looks and feels like me. This one doesn’t make an exception to the rule. I chose black taffeta because it is one of my favorite materials due to its shine and toughness. The style is also one of my favs.

The skirt is snug at the waist, and wide at the hem. I made it with a visible zipper in the center back seam, and a narrow waist band. One of the reasons I like poly taffeta so much, is how it gives seams a very crisp finish. If you concentrate just a little bit, achieving a professional result is really quite easy.

I worked the skirt using French seams. This technique gives the inside of a garment a tidy finish. I use it often with light fabrics and/or wide hems.

You’ve probably already guessed which pattern I used.

This black taffeta skirt is a mod based on our Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial. The skirt is exactly the same as in the pattern, only I made with just one layer and without the option to wear it hitched up.

The hem of the skirt has a wide ruffle. I used a strip of fabric to hide the seam, and sewed a narrow rolled hem to the skirt. This is the first garment in a long time I made using only my sewing machine!

I don’t yet know what I’m going to pair my black taffeta skirt with on Saturday, but I promise an outfit post for next week so stay tuned!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Two Velvet Skirt Looks

On Tuesday, I showed you a long velvet skirt I made based on our Lace Skirt Pattern. In today’s Everyday With an Edge -post, I wanted to share two more outfit ideas with the skirt.

Long skirts aren’t the right choice for a walk through a forest, but they’re wonderfully comfortable in the city. A long hem offers coverage from both the sun and curious eyes, and is an easy way to achieve a polished look. My velvet skirt is the kind of skirt that goes with pretty much anything. Paired with a jersey top, it makes a cute everyday-look. With a bit of lace, it turns into a comfy style for an evening out.

I planned these outfits to be as comfy as possible. They’re both best for a day of shopping, or dinner at home with the family

Velvet Skirt with Lace Cardigan

Crochet lace is one of all-time favourite things. It’s beautiful, bears a vintage vibe, and can make any outfit decadently pretty. For this outfit, I paired the velvet skirt with a basic spaghetti-strap top, an elastic belt, and a crochet cardigan I made just this spring.

 I’ve been binging on Downton Abbey lately, and wanted to create an elegant outfit to incorporate a little bit of the 1920s decadence. During the early 1920s, hems started creeping upward, and waist lines dropped drastically. Materials used in clothing were rich and detailed, especially in evening wear.

This style is very much inspired by Downton Abbey’s wealth. I like the way the cardigan and long skirt create a narrow silhouette, and the way black pearls subtly hint toward the era.

Gypsy Look

Everything off-shoulder was a big thing last summer, and the trend is still going strong. Though off-shoulder styles look lovely, they do come with one or two little issues. They tend to fall off, and when one leans over, they offer a good look at everything.

I planned this outfit to be free of both issues.

I made the off-shoulder top with chiffon sleeves last spring, and am still in the process of turning it into a pattern. For the photos, I wore the top over a basic spaghetti-strap top. I also wore a waist corselet over it. Now if the off-shoulder top slides out of place, I have the spaghetti-strapped one to trust. The corselet serves not only as a pretty detail, but to keep the top securely in place when leaning. With added safety-features, the off-shoulder top can actually be worn outside!

I paired the tops and corselet with my velvet skirt to achieve a modern gypsy-look. The large sleeves remind me of fortune tellers, so I wanted to incorporate some of their style. Instead of the romantic style with flowing hems and scarves, I chose a sleeker style. With less to look at, the outfit draws more attention to subtle details.

I felt really comfortable in this outfit, and almost wore it to my aunt’s birthday party. I decided against this only because the day was sunny and hot, and velvet would have been too warm.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about the velvet skirt looks!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Velvet Skirt

On Friday, I shared with you two outfits based on our Lace Skirt. I also mentioned a mod I made on the pattern. Today, as promised, I’m featuring the mod, which is a long velvet skirt.

I had a bit of crushed velvet stashed. I kinda like it, but it can be a bit tricky. Made into a snug little dress it looks cheap, and made into a long, flowing garment it gathers up static electricity like a *****. I sorted out the dilemma by turning the velvet into a long but narrow skirt. I used The Lace Skirt Pattern as a guideline. The shape of the velvet skirt is exactly the same, only I made the hem longer.

Lengthening the hem of an A-lined skirt pattern is quite easy, and there’s loads of tutorials on how to do this. I actually just eyeballed the process, and the skirt turned out really nice.

My velvet skirt has a basic elastic waist, which is a little different from the original pattern. This kind of waist is comfy, but looks better hidden.

To add a bit of coverage to the flimsy velvet, I sewed a knee-length lining to the skirt.

For the photos, I created an outfit I actually wear quite a lot. I like to be comfortable and look presentable when working from home, so I wear long skirts and cute tops often. For this look, I chose the pink version of our Wrap-Cut Tops Pattern.

The pink top is made by upcycling a T-shirt with a funky print. I used the entire Tee for the front pieces, and cut the back piece from black cotton jersey. I really like the way the top turned out, and though pink isn’t my all-time-favourite, it’s ok in this piece.

Since the summer’s been pretty cold so far, I added sleeves to the outfit. I get cold easily, and sleeves keep me at least a little bit warmer.

I really like the way the skirt turned out. It’s comfy to wear, and it can even be worn out! I think I’m going to make another one to wear around the house, and save this one for partying ^^

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my velvet skirt! I’m going to feature two more outfits based on it on Friday, so stay tuned!

Until then.

Love,

Heather

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One Skirt – Two Looks

On Tuesday, I showed you a skirt I made based on our Lace Skirt Sewing Pattern. The pattern is on sale for all VIPs until June 12th. At first, I was going to do a one weekend flash sale with the skirt. On Wednesday, though, I remembered another mod I made with the pattern. I’m going to feature that next week, but today we’ll take a closer look at the original lace skirt pattern.

The Lace Skirt is made with non-elastic lace, and lined with contrast-coloured lining. I chose the combination of black and red. The skirt has an elastic waist which makes it both easy to make and comfy to wear, and a long, detachable belt that can be tied in many ways.

Today, I wanted to show you two outfits based on The Lace Skirt, a day style, and a look for the evening. I planned these outfits for a Friday, actually, and the scenario of having a date after work. Going home to change can be a luxury one can’t afford. On those days, it’s nice to freshen a work-look with details.

Lace Skirt for Casual Friday

Office dress codes can be demanding. The Lace Skirt worn with a basic top is an easy way to achieve a tidy, polished look. For this outfit, I chose a jersey top with a high collar and peephole. The top has long sleeves. When pushed up to the elbows, they won’t get in the way when typing, and, better yet, stay dry and clean when washing hands and having lunch. An elastic belt gives the outfit a modest detail, and red pumps add a splash of colour.

I wore my hair on a ponytail. A basic hair do draws away attention from the a-bit-too-fancy skirt, and makes the outfit office-friendly.

An A-lined lace skirt is office-friendly - on casual Fridays

Lace Skirt for Date Night

An evening out calls for something fancier. A jersey top can seem like a safe choice, but when paired with lace, it can go from OK to Oh Wow. For an evening look, I pulled down the top’s sleeves. They’re made with thumb holes which gives the top an interesting vibe. I removed the elastic belt, and replaced it with the original long lace belt. I tied the belt 2,5 times around my waist, pulled it wide, and secured it to place with a brooch. This makes the skirt appear to have a high waist, which gives the outfit a flattering empire line. The brooch adds a detail that’s both charming and decadent, and the red pumps make the outfit cute in a casual way.

I pulled my hair into a basic bun for this look. An updo makes any outfit look more glamorous, and most of all, makes you feel more special.

This outfit may not be the fanciest option ever, but it’s cute, comfy, and works wonderfully for an evening out on Friday. To transform from day to night, you’ll only need to pack the lace belt, a brooch, and some hair pins.

Worn with a wide belt, a simple skirt works for even a fancier dinner

I hope you’ve enjoyed my first Day To Night -post!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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From Sweater to Shrug

Once upon a time, I had a lace sweater. I liked the material, but the shape not so much. The sweater was snug and long. It had a keyhole neck, a high collar which was a bit too tight, and a rib at the hem and cuffs which was also a bit too tight. In order to salvage the sweater, I turned it into a shrug. The transformation paid off: the not-too-nice sweater turned into my favourite lace shrug!

The project was relatively simple. I cut off the excess length and the too tight cuffs. I then opened the sweater down the center front line, and gave the edges a curved shape. I used elastic bias tape to bind the shrug with, and added buttons along with button loops to the collar.

The whole project took me about an hour. I did this a few years ago, and I’ve gotten a lot of wear out of this lace shrug. Turns out a little bit of effort really can save a garment that isn’t all that perfect!

The shrug works really well with dresses and over tops, but I love to pair it with corsets even more. The lace shrug has a perfect shape to be worn over an overbust, and it offers both coverage and warmth. For the photos, I wore the shrug with The DeathRock Bustier and Lace Skirt. The outfit turned out quite dark, and well suited for evenings out.

The Lace Skirt is a mod of our Lace Skirt Pattern (which will be this week’s VIP-offer!). It’s made with non-elastic lace fabric, and it has a purple lining. I love the colour combo, though pinks and purples were strangers to me for a long time. When my hair was red, I used to be jealous of ladies who could rock red hair and pink outfits. When I tried to do the same, I colourblind instead of gorgeous. Returning to black hair opened my mind to the prospect of adding a bit of purple and even the dreaded pink to wardrobe, and I actually kinda like it!

To top off the outfit, I added large hoops and my trusted Demonias. A little bit of silver brinks sparkle to the look, and compliments the way purple lining glimmers through lace. And yes, I once again forgot the correct order of getting dressed. Ouch.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my lace shrug!

Don’t forget to order our newsletter if you haven’t yet done so. This week, we’ll be having The Lace Skirt on sale, but only for VIPs!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Red Crochet Skirt

Once upon a time, I decided to want a red crochet skirt. This happened before I made the black dress I showed you a while back. For this skirt, I used the same lace repeat. I really like this lace, it’s easy to hook, and lovely to look at. The repeat is only three rows high, so it’s also easy to memorize.

I crocheted the skirt with Novita’s long-gone Kotiväki. It’s a pretty basic mercerized cotton suitable for hook sizes 2,5mm to 3,5mm. I like working with larger hooks, so I liked the yarn. The consistency pleased me as well. I like natural fibers, and cotton works nice with lace. It also gives crochet projects really pretty stitch definition.

Finding a substitute for Kotiväki has proven surprisingly difficult. Fingering weight blends are numerous, but cotton is harder to come by. I guess I’ll have to settle for blends in the future.

Red Crochet Skirt Detail

I wanted my skirt to be tight, but not too tight to walk in. I wanted it long and narrow and fitted at the hip.

Achieving this was easier than I thought. I started at the waist with a 2,5mm hook and worked my way down upping hook size twice. This made the skirt widen without increases. When the skirt reached my knees, I changed to hook size 4mm, and worked the rest of the hem.

I like the way the skirt turned out. It doesn’t have a lining because I want to wear it with both short and long underskirts. Versatility is important to me, and this skirt provides it.

Crochet Skirt over Bodycon Dress

Crochet garments, especially lacey ones, are light and see-through. Petticoats are in order when wearing a lace skirt. For this outfit, I paired the red crochet skirt with The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress. Worn under the skirt, the dress provides coverage. It also doubles as a top.

To cover up the waist of the skirt, I wore The Embroidered Waist Corselet. This light-weight corselet is made with elastic material, and features buttons at the front, and light embroidery on the sides. Contrast coloured bone channels continue the red hem a bit higher, and make it blend into the top without a clear line. I like to do this when wearing colours. Combining two colours that are quite far from each other, it feels nice to bind them together with another garment. A hard break of colour in any outfit can seem a bit harsh.

Wearing a dress under a skirt comes with one more bonus feature: you won’t have a shirt tail to worry about.

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my red crochet skirt!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Hitched Hems

Dresses are my favorite things to wear. They’re easy to mix and match, and never out of place. Styles to choose from are endless, and materials used vary from cotton to velvet to leather. Personally, I like dresses that are both versatile and classic. One of my favorite designs in our collection is The Princess and Keyhole Dress. It features puff-sleeves, a keyhole neck, and hitched hems.

princess-seamed dress, one

The Princess and Keyhole Dress is best made with non-elastic materials such as cotton. The dress has princess seams, so it’s shaped at the bodice, and a wide hem. Puff-sleeves make it comfy to wear, but the key element is the hem.

The dress is made with channels on the hem’s seams. With ribbons slid into the channels, the hem can be modified in both length and shape. The dress can be worn long, pulled up at the front, or gathered into a short version. I like to use the ribbons to shorten the hem at the front to show off a colorful peticoat.

The shape of the dress finds its origin in the Victorian era, when hems were wide, ruffled, and often gathered. I’ve used the element of hitched hems in an earlier design as well.

princess-seamed dress, four

The Victorian Skirt is made with two layers. The botton layer features a wide ruffle, and the upper layer can be hitched up with ribbons. The Victorian Skirt is made with a very simple pattern, so it’s available as a drafting tutorial only. This allows everyone to create a skirt with their own, unique measurements.
Hitched hems are an easy way to create a versatile dress. The Victorian Skirt can be worn with both layers smooth and long, pulled up evenly, gathered at the front, or even arranged into a bustle-like shape. I like to wear mine gathered evenly, and I’ve even made a version with ribbon channels on both layers of the skirt.

black satin skirt, Victorian style

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about our Hitched Hems -sewing patterns.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Garter Petticoat

I like to wear shorts skirts during the winter. Long hems drag along in the cold snow, the snow melts, and soaks my shoes. With short skirts and dresses, my feet stay dry. But the issue of cold legs remains. Adding long socks or leg warmers to the mix is an uncomfortable fix: they both have a tendency of sliding down. That’s why I came up with the idea to add garters to an underskirt. The solution worked like a charm, and I turned it into a Garter Petticoat Sewing Pattern.

Garter Petticoat Sewing Pattern 1

In order to make the garter petticoat as comfortable as possible, I made it with sturdy cotton jersey. It’s warm, it’s durable, and the fabric is easy to work with. You can find some in any fabric store in loads of colours, and the cost usually stays quite low. You can naturally make this with any elastic material, but I recommend using a heavier jersey. The garters need something to hold on to, and thick cotton grants them just that.

The hem of the petticoat has an angular shape. If you prefer, go ahead and cut it straight along the lowest point of the angles. Personally, I feel that the angular shape brings to mind vintage lingerie. Along with garters and cute socks, the vintage-vibe is even stronger. The garter petticoat is my absolute favourite. I’ve made two, and I wear them all them time! Paired with tights, over-knees, and a flowing skirt or two, I no longer freeze to death when venturing outside.

Garter Petticoat Sewing Pattern 2

The model piece for the Garter Petticoat Sewing Pattern is hemmed with contrast-coloured underwear elastic. You can use any kind of elastic lace to hem the petticoat with. I recommend a narrow lace, but a longer version can work, too. The contrast-colour works as an eye-catcher, so if you’d like a not-so-obvious version, match the lace to the colour of your fabric.

I hope you’ll enjoy our Garter Skirt Sewing Pattern!

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

Garter Petticoat Sewing Pattern 3

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