Crinkle Skirt Styles

On Tuesday, I shared a tutorial on how to sew a basic skirt with crinkle fabric. The tutorial is available here. Today we’re going to look at outfits based on the skirt. I really like this skirt, but it turns out that crinkle skirt styles are surprisingly difficult. There’s not that much you can do with a skirt: pairing it up with a top is pretty much it. What affects the outfit most of all is the style of the top. Let’s take a look at how a basic skirt can change.

Office Appropriate

Clean, basic looks are perfect for the office. A cute blouse paired with basic pumps make the crinkle skirt fit for a working environment. Elastic material ensures a comfy fit for the blouse, and puff sleeves add a feminine element to the look.

This outfit is really comfy. The skirt’s wide and long enough to office friendly, and the elasticity of the blouse adds another level to comfort. A fitted blouse stays put, and hides co-cooperatively under a skirt’s waist. Matching pumps and a tidy hairdo make the outfit look polished.

The blouse is made with our Loli Outfit Pattern.

Tight Waist

Basic skirts love corsets. For the second crinkle skirt style, I paired wide hems with a tight corset. Our Reversible Waist Corset has been my favorite for a long time, and it’s starting to show. As I was putting it on, I noted a small tear on the black side. I guess it’s time to make a new one! The corset still has some wear in it, and I decided to go ahead and use it for this look. I wore a green spaghetti strap top under it to give the outfit a bit of color. I got the lace top from H&M a few years back. It’s really comfy and super-cute, I just can’t understand why I didn’t buy a black one, too.

This look is perfect for going out. It’s comfy despite the tight corset, and cool enough to wear at crowded bars. To make it warmer, just wear a mesh top under it, or pop a shrug over it.

Party!

Fall isn’t really the time for parties, but Christmas will be here sooner than you think. This outfit is pretty perfect for a dinner with the family around Yule-time. I paired the crinkle skirt with our Pretty Basic Lace Top, and wore a lace petticoat under the skirt to give it a bit of volume. This skirt would love a poofy petticoat, and I’m thinking about making one with grey organza!

Basic looks can change a great deal though material. Made with jerseys, this would be a “just hanging around the house” -outfit. Crinkle fabric and lace make the style suitable for casual parties and get-togethers.

Winter Is Coming

Days are getting colder, there’s no denying it. I hate being cold, and am most likely the first one to reach for a cardigan. I wanted to incorporate a sweater for the last look to show you that skirts can work during the winter as well. Light layers can surprisingly warm: one winter I went out wearing two long skirts, two long-sleeved Tees, a shrug, two layers of socks and a coat, and I was hot though it was -30 degrees celsius!

For this look, I paired the crinkle skirt with a spaghetti strap top, my blood stain corselet, and our Cropped Pullover.

This sweater is my favorite one ever. I love this particular shade of orange, the raglan shape is cute and comfy, and the collar turned out just right. The shape of the hem, though, is the thing that’s most unusual about this design. The front hem curves up, and the back hem falls lower to reach the waist. This cropped sweater it worked top down, and despite the non-traditional shape, it’s really easy to knit. This sweater is available in three variations: ribbed and smooth in one pattern, and cabled in another.

This outfit is again something I am very likely to wear during the coming winter. The sweater is really cute and works well with the skirt and corset. The crinkle skirt looks nice, is comfy, and worn over a Garter Petticoat, will be warm enough for winter.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about our crinkle skirt styles.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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How To Make a Crinkle Skirt

A few weeks ago, Mom brought me a pile of fabrics. She needed a new top or two, and naturally turned to me. In addition to the materials she wanted me to use for the tops, she brought me a present. Crinckle fabric. The material wanted to be a skirt, and so I decided to show you how to make a crinkle skirt.

Now I haven’t seen this material since the crinckle skirt was a big hit back in the year I-forget. I didn’t expect to run into it again, but there it was, demanding attention. This fabric is making a comeback, so I wanted to make a tutorial on how to turn it into a skirt. You can make blouses and jackets and all sorts of thing with this material, but I would stick to simple designs. This stuff is difficult to cut, and the pleats can throw off a fitted garment’s shape. We’re going to keep it simple, and make a skirt with two straight pieces.

How To Make a Crinkle Skirt

A skirt made with just two rectangular pieces is the simplest skirt design known to man. It requires a certain kind of material to look its best. Pleated and crinckled fabrics work best for this style.

You will need

 -Two lengths + 6″ of 50″ wide crinkle fabric if the crinkle is vertical.

I dug around, and found a fabric very similar to the one I used. It’s available in glittery black and a lovely dusky pink. Both of these fabrics are sold by Tia Knight’s fabric store in UK. I’ve ordered fabrics from them both on their actual site and eBay on several occasions, and totally recommend them.

– 2″ wide elastic band

– 8″ long zipper

– sewing machine (serger optional)

– notions you like to use when sewing

how to make a crinkle skirt - material

Start by measuring the desired length of your skirt. I chose to make a knee-length skirt that sits on my waist, so I measured the distance between waist and knee. That came to 55 cm, allowance included.

We’ll want the crinkle pattern to be vertical.

Cut two straight pieces to the desired length.

how to make a crinkle skirt - cutting

With right sides facing, sew one side seam. Serge through raw edges.

I used my serger for sewing, but a sewing machine will be just as good.

how to make a crinkle skirt - sewing

Install a zipper to the other side seam. This tutorial will help you along!

how to make a crinkle skirt - installing zipper

We’ll want the waist to be both tight and elastic. The finished skirt will be heavy, and it needs to sit securely at the waist.

Cut a strip of fabric a bit longer than your waist and wide enough to house your elastic band. Don’t forget to add allowance!

Pin the waistband to the inside of the skirt with right side facing the wrong side of the skirt’s waist. Gather all of the fabric to the waist band. The crinkle of the material will come to aid with this step. Though there seems to be an abundance of material, it will all fit onto the waistband.

Sew the waistband to place.

how to make a crinkle skirt - installing waistband

Take your elastic band, and place it in between the waistband and the seam. Secure both ends to the waistband, fold the waistband over the elastic, and tuck in the raw edge. Top stitch to place while carefully stretching the elastic to length. Top stitch the upper edge of the waist band to keep the elastic from turning inside.

how to make a crinkle skirt - finished waistband

Hem the crinkle skirt, and you’re all done!

how to make a crinkle skirt - hemming

I really love the way the skirt turned out. It’s cute, it’s wide, and despite the huge amount of fabric piled onto the waist, it has quite a narrow silhouette. The material is nice and lively, and the simple style goes with almost anything.

How To Make A Crinkle Skirt - All Done!

I hope you’ve enjoyed this little tutorial on how to make a crinkle skirt! On Friday, I’ll show you a few ways to style this cute crinkle skirt.

Until then.

Love,

Heather

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The Many Faces of a Spaghetti Strap Top

The Spaghetti Strap Top is a wondrous thing. It goes with everything and anything, it’s easy to sew, and even comfortable. Today, I wanted to show you just a couple of ways to rock the classic. My photo session got completely out of hand, so instead of three outfits, you get seven!

Our Pretty Basic Spaghetti Strap Top is launched today, and on flash sale for all VIPs. I thought this is reason enough to celebrate with loads of spaghetti strap styles.

Warm in Blue

One of the easiest ways of creating spaghetti strap styles is to wear a top over a light long-sleeved Tee. I do this all the time. A mesh top is very see-through, and demands another layer. A spaghetti strap top offers just enough coverage, but doesn’t completely hide the mesh. For this look, I picked a petrol blue mesh top. I wore it under a black top embellished with a bit of lace, and paired the tops with my long velvet skirt.

This style is really comfy. It’s perfect for going shopping, and as fall draws near, the light layers offer much needed warmth.

Shrug It Up

Spaghetti Strap Tops are often low cut and revealing. As the weather turns cooler, it’s nice to cover up a little. For the second look, I wore my favorite shrug over a spaghetti strap top trimmed with blue lace. I really like the way the lace peeks out just a little, giving a splash of color to the black outfit. One drop of contrast catches the eye far better than many!

I wore The Pretty Basic Jersey Skirt for this outfit. It goes perfectly with The Pretty Basic Spaghetti Strap Top, and The Hooded Shrug will look lovely with the combo.

I wore a black sash as a belt to hide the elastic waist of the skirt. I secured the belt to place with a brooch to give the outfit another detail.

This style is also super-comfy, and perfect for casual outings.

Ruffle Hems

The weather may be changing, but days can still be warm. A spaghetti strap top is still warm enough indoors. For the next look, I picked out a skirt I haven’t shown you yet. It will maybe come out as a pattern soon!

I like to pair fabrics that have the same consistency. Synthetics go with synthetics and cotton with cotton. All the elements of this style are made with viscose jersey, which is my favorite material. It’s light, it breathes, and it’s nice and soft. It’s perfect for summer clothes, such as spaghetti strap tops. I made this one a bit longer so I can wear it over skirt waists.

The skirt is made of two layers. Beneath, there’s a tight fitted shell. Over it goes a contrast colored layer with a ruffled hem. For this outfit, I gathered the hem and secured it with a brooch to add more detail to the otherwise basic look. The skirt is really cute worn as is, too, and it goes with all of our basic tops.

This style works really well with my personal taste, only I might wear a black mesh top under it. I get cold easily and it makes me all whingy!

Black and White Skulls

Basic tops love corsets, and that’s why you’ll see a lot of spaghetti strap styles on darkly inclined ladies. A skimpy top doesn’t wrinkle up under a tight corset, and feels comfortable and cool at crowded clubs. I paired a black spaghetti strap top up with a long peasant skirt and our Reversible Corset. The outfit is classic and comfortable, and the long full hems give it a romantic feel.

This style can be completed with jewelry, or with a shrug. A mesh top under the top will give more warmth. You can also add sleeves to the outfit to give it a more interesting feel!

Red Lace

Spaghetti strap styles are often seen as day-to-day looks. A basic top is easy to pop on with a pair of jeans or a jersey skirt. It’s easy to forget that a spaghetti strap top can work for parties, too. Just pick a high-quality material, and pay attention to embellishments and finishing.

I paired a basic spaghetti strap top with our Lace Skirt to create a look fit for casual parties with the family. This kind of outfits are perfect for small birthdays and dinners.

I tied the belt higher this time to hide the lace on the top. I think two kinds of lace can clash pretty badly, and I wanted to avoid that. The belt gives the skirt a high waist, and changes the silhouette toward an empire-style. I tied the look together with red pumps, and skipped wearing jewelry to keep the outfit simple.

Funky and Cute

One top is cute, so wearing two is even cuter. I layered two tops for this look. I wore a top with a blue lace over a solid black one to make the detail pop even more. I wanted to create a cute, fun look for partying. I paired the tops with our PuffBall Skirt and an elastic belt. A bit of dark silver jewelry and high heels top up the look.

And of course what makes an outfit cute is the attitude you wear it with.

And Then There’s How I Wear It

Spaghetti strap styles are various and versatile. They range from casual to festive to funky, and suit almost any taste.

I wear spaghetti strap tops quite often, and wanted to show you how I like to make them a part of my unique look. This is an outfit I would gladly wear to any club! I wore a black mesh top with black velvet-print polkadots, a spaghetti strap top, my PuffBall Skirt, a Reversible Waist Corset, and loads of necklaces and bangles.

I hope you’ve enjoyed our super-long outfit post with spaghetti strap styles!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Basic Styles for Stepping Out

Last week, we launched two new additions to The Pretty Basics. The Pretty Basic Lace Top and Jersey Skirt are this week’s featured products, and on sale for all VIPs until Monday. Today, I wanted to share a few outfit ideas based on the two new patterns.

The Pretty Basics are designed to go with everything. The Basics are easy to make jersey skirts, tops, and dresses that easily pair up with each other. The Basics also like other designs. For today’s post, I created outfits with the two new Basics and our other designs.

Mermaid Skirt with Black Lace

Sometimes, a skirt comes with loads of details. Garments with a lot going on can be challenging to wear. Our Mermaid Skirt is made with D-rings, embellished pockets, and decorative lacings. The skirt has a figure-hugging fit, and it’s best made with elastic materials.

Pairing the skirt up with corsets can work, but I think it likes simple tops better. The Pretty Basic Lace Top goes beautifully with The Mermaid Skirt. The fitted top repeats the snug lines of the skirt without taking away from its intricate look.

I really like this style, and would totally wear it out. The simplistic feel of it appeals to me, and I like it that though the outfit is basically made of two pieces, it still has a lot of details. The lacings and D-rings diminish the need for jewelry, and the lace combined to pinstripes create an interesting mixture of patterns.

Black Tulle Peasant Skirt

Peasant skirts can be made with all kinds of materials. Cotton is the safest, most popular choice. Light, printed cottons make the perfect skirts for summer, but the classic style can work with less conventional fabrics, too.

I made mine with black tulle.

Tulle skirts can’t be worn on their own. Tulle is see-through, and requires a lining or another skirt under it. I made my tulle skirt without a lining. This way, I can pair it with more kids of skirts. I usually wear this with a wide, black cotton skirt to gain a look resembling Scarlett O’Hara’s mourning dresses. The tulle skirt works also with a lighter skirt beneath. For this look, I wore it over The Pretty Basic Jersey Skirt. The tulle falls over The Jersey Skirt in soft, delicate folds creating a narrower silhouette. I paired the skirts with a combo of tops. I wore a basic spaghetti strap top over a long sleeved mesh top.

Both skirts have a basic elastic waist. To give the outfit a polished look, I covered the waistbands with a wide belt. A few necklaces tie the look together.

Puffs and Pearls and Lace, oh my

Sometimes, a new top reminds you of a skirt you’ve completely forgotten. That happened to me when I finished The Lace Top. I went over my collection of skirts in my mind, and suddenly remembered my Puff-Ball Skirt.

I was pretty small in the eighties, but I still remember when puffball skirts came back into fashion. I had one, and I loved it to bits. They went out of style pretty soon. After growing up and deciding I get to wear whatever I want, I made a few more. I still love puff-balls, and I’m super-happy for re-discovering this one.

I made the skirt with a light poly-blend, and gathered the hem to shape with buttons. The skirt is made with out Puff-Ball Skirt Sewing Pattern. The only difference is that I made this version with an elastic waist.

For this look, I paired The Puff-Ball Skirt with The Lace Top, and used an elastic belt to cover the not-so-pretty waist.

I really like the silhouette of The Puff-Ball Skirt, and can’t wait to wear it out!

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my outfit ideas for Pretty Basics.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Pretty Basic Looks

On Tuesday, I showed you sneak peaks of two new patterns. The Pretty Basic Lace Top and Pretty Basic Jersey Skirt Patterns were launched earlier today. For today’s post I wanted to share a few looks based on the fresh patterns.

Here are the materials I used for making these garments. If you get them through these links, I might make a little extra.
58″ Nude Nylon Power Mesh Fabric by the Yard – 1 Yard
Black Flower With Leaf Stretch Lace Fabric 4 Way Stretch Nylon Spandex 4 Oz 56-58″
Discount Fabric Lycra/Spandex 4 way stretch Solid Black LY400 by Payless Fabric

Skin Tight

The Pretty Basic Lace Top is designed to be a part of an everyday wardrobe. Lace is often seen as “too much” to wear on a daily basis, but I like the effect it gives. Lace is elegant and sexy at the same time, and I really enjoy that. For the first look, I paired The Lace Top with a pencil skirt I just made. I’m thinking about featuring it in next week’s I Made This! -post, but we’ll see. I will show the skirt at some point. It’s made from a pair of pants, and I really want to share the process!

Pencil skirts are a safe choice for any occasion. They work wonderfully as office attire, they’re excellent for dates, and you can even wear one to informal parties. This look is based entirely around The Lace Top. I wanted to really show off the top, and chose against accessorizing further.

I wore my hair down for this look. I don’t usually do this, since hair covers outfits’ details. I’m thinking about chopping it, so I kinda wanted to immortalize it.

I really like this outfit. It’s cute and comfy (although the skirt is quite narrow and forces me to take short steps) and I’m hoping I’ll get to wear it somewhere soon.

Wrapped Up

Lace is elegant, but it can turn the other way, too. For the second look, I wanted to bring a touch of Punk.

Our Wrap Skirt is a unisex pattern. It has a very androgynous feel, and is designed to fit both him and her. I’ve added buttons to one side of my skirt. They serve a decorational purpose only. The lining of my wrap skirt is brown, and I wanted to bring some of that to the outside of the skirt as well. The Lace Top brings a bit of femininity to the look along with my favorite – and most comfortable -heels.

The choker is brand new. I got it off eBay, so it’s not very high in quality. It’s made with cut-out velvet, so it’s soft and comfy. I chose to wear it for this look to bring in more punk-inspired elements. I didn’t want to overdo it, though, so I left the outfit pretty simple.

I wore my hair on a loose braid for this look. A more ambitious hairdo would have been too much.

This style is actually my favorite of this bunch. It’s cute, it’s comfortable, and I felt at home in it. I can totally see wearing this for a shopping spree!

All Basic

Our Pretty Basics are designed to love each other. The styles are simple and elegant which makes them easy to mix and match. The pieces of the collection all like accessories, and are easy to use as a basis of outfits. The Basics work alone as well. Pairing up The Jersey Skirt and Jersey Top makes a comfy outfit for hanging around the house. This is in fact the kind of outfit I wear when I’m at home working. It’s super-comfortable but still nice enough to step out in. It’s simple with nothing that can get caught in sewing machines or knitting needles, and it’s cute enough to make me feel pretty.

Feeling pretty is important for me. Creating beautiful things is a big part of my job. It’s much easier to do that when I beautiful. The Pretty Basics do just that. They’re casual, practical, and still lovely.

Warm and Snuggly

Summer’s still warm, but nights will soon start to turn cold. Coats are too much, so I like to turn to cardigans. For the last look, I paired The Jersey Skirt with a Pretty Basic Spaghetti Strap Top (yes, the pattern’s coming out soon!)  which you can’t really see in the photos. The Basics create a dark canvas for a snuggly cardigan that’s perfect for cooler summer nights. The Seed Stitch Shrug is knit with chunky yarn and large needles. It’s a quick, easy knit despite its size, and the pattern is beginner-friendly.

I haven’t worn my Seed Stitch Shrug much. I’m pretty used to just throwing on my Granny Square Cardigan, but this one is warmer and softer. It also goes really well with all The Basics. I do believe I should make this shrug a part of The Basics when I get a chance to rearrange the store!

 I hope you’ve enjoyed this week’s outfit post, and will add The Lace Top and Jersey Skirt to your own wardrobes.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Pretty Basic Sneak Peaks

As you may remember, I came down with a bug last week. I thought I’d be over it by now, but nope. This thing must really like me! So instead of an I Made This! -post, I’m giving you a sneak peak on two patterns which will be published on Friday. Both patterns are pretty much done, and will be on sale for all VIPs starting launch day.

I really like The Pretty Basics. They’re comfy to wear, and easy to mix and match. The materials are soft and flowing, and the styles femine and cute. These are the kind of clothes that make getting dressed easy. They pretty much eliminate the whole “omg I have to be somewhere and I have nothing to wear” -problem. There’s no need to stress when you can just pull out a Pretty Basic Dress and have fun with it.

The newest addition to collection is The Pretty Basic Lace Top. It’s made with super-elastic lace and a bit of viscose jersey.

I really like lace. Working with it can be difficult, though. Hemming lace fabric is a pain. I decided to make things easier by adding cuffs to The Lace Top. This detail gives the top a polished look, and make the sleeves comfy to wear.

The Lace Top is very low cut. I wanted to keep it from looking, well, too cheap, and decided to remove some of the lace’s see-through effect.

The front piece is lined with skin toned mesh. This makes the top translucent, but not in a noticeable way.

I used nude power mesh for The Lace Top. The fabrics are available on amazon. If you get them through the links below, I might make a little extra.
58″ Nude Nylon Power Mesh Fabric by the Yard – 1 Yard
Black Flower With Leaf Stretch Lace Fabric 4 Way Stretch Nylon Spandex 4 Oz 56-58″

The Lace Top goes perfectly with another soon-to-come pattern.

Most Pretty Basics are born when I look into my closet and think “now why don’t I have a X?” The thing I miss is always something very basic that can be paired with anything. In the latest case, the thing I was missing was – and I kid you not – a long jersey skirt.

I know I had a few at some point, but now – no. So I made a new one, and added the pattern to The Pretty Basic Collection. I used a lycra for this skirt. It’s also available on amazon.
Discount Fabric Lycra/Spandex 4 way stretch Solid Black LY400 by Payless Fabric

As said, both patterns will come out this Friday, so stay tuned for The Pretty Basic Lace Top and The Pretty Basic Jersey Skirt!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Birthday Outfit

Last week’s theme was quite Victorian. We’ll continue in the same direction today as I’ll finally show you my finished taffeta skirt. I made the skirt for my Birthday, and intended to wear it for my party. Weather, as it turned out, had a different opinion about my plans. The day was hot and humid, and after getting dressed and gotten photos taken, I changed into something else. A long jersey dress with lace inserts was a much more comfortable choice, but I still felt super-warm all day.

I made the taffeta skirt with the help of our Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial. I altered the original style a bit. My skirt only has one layer, and no ribbon channels for hitching up the hem. The skirt is still pretty, and likes many kinds of tops.

For my Birthday, I paired it up with a lace blouse and a waist corset.

The lace blouse is store-bought. I got it from a flea market with its tags cut off, so I can’t tell you who made it. It’s lovely, though, with wide ruffles at the cuffs and a very high collar. It’s made with elastic lace, so it’s comfy, too.

The corset is hand-made. It’s a prototype of our Reversible Waist Corset, actually. I made the black satin corset with purple lining and bone channels, and a criss-cross button closure at the front. The back has a lacing and a modesty panel, so this one works wonderfully with skirt-blouse -combos. The chains on the corset can be removed: they have clasps, and attach to little loops sewn into the seams.

For some reason, I don’t own a lot of jewelry. I guess I’ve always concentrated more on clothing. These pieces are my favorites, though, and I wear them often. I got the ankh when I was 14 or so, and it bears a lot of sentimental value. The pearls I bought a few years back, and they quickly became my trusted companions.

I like the way they go with this particular blouse. The ankh obscures the button list a bit (when it’s not hiding inside it, next time I’ll remember to check photos more closely!) and the pearls give the blouse a bit more femininity.

I really liked this outfit, and it would have been perfect for the party. I’ve probably mentioned that summer isn’t a very good time to dress Victorian! Let’s hope I’ll get to wear this some other time.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Two Victorian Skirt Styles

On Tuesday, I showed you sneak peaks of a skirt I made for my Birthday. My black taffeta skirt is all done, but I’ll share it fully next week. Today, I wanted to share two outfits based on another skirt.

My taffeta skirt was made with the help of our Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial. I made mine with only one layer, and without the option to wear it hitched up. I have, however, made a full version of the Victorian Skirt, and it’s one of my favorite styles. The skirt is pretty and versatile, and I feel comfortable in it. It’s one of my go-to -garments that both look and feel like Me.

The Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial isn’t a pattern, and does not come with one. Instead, it will help you to draft your own pattern for your own measurements. It also comes with a fully illustrated sewing tutorial.

The skirt looks complicated, and can feel intimidating to make, but trust me,  it’s really super-easy!

Wearing this skirt is also easy. Despite the Victorian vibe that practically cries for a corset, the skirt actually likes casual tops, too.

Wrap-Cut Top with Victorian Vibe

Summer calls for lighter outfits, but it’s difficult to lighten a Gothic style. RomantiGoths have a pretty hard time during the warm season: layers of long hems and blouses and corsets can make us very uncomfortable. Popping on a black sundress and just saying F**k This to image is a perfectly acceptable option (I do it all the time) but sometimes it’s nice to go for a more distinct look. I wanted to create a summer style based on The Victorian Skirt.

I made this skirt with polyester satin, so it’s pretty hot during the summer. Using light cotton will make this skirt cooler to wear on warm days. It will look lovely made with cotton, but comfort-level will increase big time. To show you that the skirt doesn’t need to be worn with a corset, I paired it with the orange version of our Wrap-Cut Top. The asymmetric hem and lace create an interesting opposite to the romantic hems. The sleeveless top makes the outfit cool and comfy.

I added black pearls and bangles to this style. I wanted to concentrate on just two colors, and hesitated introducing a third one as jewelry. A two-toned style is elegant in an easy way.

Summer days are often sunny, and going out like this terrifies me. Getting a tan is not an option! When venturing out, I would add a sun hat (black, of course) or a parasol. And of course loads of sunblock!

The Secretary

Introducing masculine elements to feminine outfits is both popular and fun. I like to call this style the Secretary-look. This look works even better with a pencil skirt. Personally, I don’t feel comfortable in them, but they do look super-cute on everyone else.

The Secretary-look is easily achieved by pairing up a fitted blouse, a black tie, and a waist corset. A neat bun increases the effect of this style even further.

I chose to wear this with The Victorian Skirt because this is one of my signature styles. I love this outfit, and would wear it to a party any day.

But with socks and different shoes! Today was suffocatingly warm, and I could not face wearing socks with this skirt.

The Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial will be our VIP-offer for the next two weeks. On Tuesday, I’ll show you what I decided to pair my new skirt with for my B-Day party!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Black Taffeta Skirt

It’s my Birthday next Monday and to celebrate, I’ll be hosting a small party on Saturday. These two things combined meant that I needed a new skirt. I had some taffeta stashed, and since this is a pretty big Even Number -thing, it felt OK to sew a skirt with a nicer fabric. I decided to show you only sneak peaks of my black taffeta skirt today. It’s all wrinkly and needs a wash before  it can be worn. I want to wear in on Saturday, so I’ll showcase an outfit based on it next Tuesday.

Taffeta sounds super-fancy, and it can be that. When you think of taffeta, you probably see a starched evening gown that rustles softly on a red carpet. Taffeta is a twisted-woven fabric type which can be made with fibers varying from silk to polyester. A high-quality taffeta is made with natural fibers, and suitable for wedding dresses. My skirt is made with a “yeah, just going to a Goth-gig” -grade polyester. It has a lovely shine to it, but at 4€/meter, I wouldn’t be caught dead going to a proper party in this.

For my “Friends Only and To The Pub Later” -B-Day it’s perfect, though. I’m very likely to get champagne spilled on me, and this won’t mind.

On my Birthdays, I tend to make a point of wearing something that both looks and feels like me. This one doesn’t make an exception to the rule. I chose black taffeta because it is one of my favorite materials due to its shine and toughness. The style is also one of my favs.

The skirt is snug at the waist, and wide at the hem. I made it with a visible zipper in the center back seam, and a narrow waist band. One of the reasons I like poly taffeta so much, is how it gives seams a very crisp finish. If you concentrate just a little bit, achieving a professional result is really quite easy.

I worked the skirt using French seams. This technique gives the inside of a garment a tidy finish. I use it often with light fabrics and/or wide hems.

You’ve probably already guessed which pattern I used.

This black taffeta skirt is a mod based on our Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial. The skirt is exactly the same as in the pattern, only I made with just one layer and without the option to wear it hitched up.

Taffeta is abundant in every fabric store. You can also get it on amazon. I found an elastic taffeta, that’s perfect for fitted garments. With a bit of stretch, skirts fit better and feel more comfortable. I also dug up a beautiful purple taffeta with a Gothic print. If I got to choose, I’d make one layer with the elastic taffeta, and the outer layer with the printed one.

If you purchase materials through the links below, I  might make a little extra.
Stretch Taffeta Black Fabric By The Yard
Taffeta Flocking Damask Purple 58 Inch Wide Fabric By the Yard (F.E.®)

The hem of the skirt has a wide ruffle. I used a strip of fabric to hide the seam, and sewed a narrow rolled hem to the skirt. This is the first garment in a long time I made using only my sewing machine!

I don’t yet know what I’m going to pair my black taffeta skirt with on Saturday, but I promise an outfit post for next week so stay tuned!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Two Velvet Skirt Looks

On Tuesday, I showed you a long velvet skirt I made based on our Lace Skirt Pattern. In today’s Everyday With an Edge -post, I wanted to share two more outfit ideas with the skirt.

Long skirts aren’t the right choice for a walk through a forest, but they’re wonderfully comfortable in the city. A long hem offers coverage from both the sun and curious eyes, and is an easy way to achieve a polished look. My velvet skirt is the kind of skirt that goes with pretty much anything. Paired with a jersey top, it makes a cute everyday-look. With a bit of lace, it turns into a comfy style for an evening out.

I planned these outfits to be as comfy as possible. They’re both best for a day of shopping, or dinner at home with the family

Velvet Skirt with Lace Cardigan

Crochet lace is one of all-time favourite things. It’s beautiful, bears a vintage vibe, and can make any outfit decadently pretty. For this outfit, I paired the velvet skirt with a basic spaghetti-strap top, an elastic belt, and a crochet cardigan I made just this spring.

 I’ve been binging on Downton Abbey lately, and wanted to create an elegant outfit to incorporate a little bit of the 1920s decadence. During the early 1920s, hems started creeping upward, and waist lines dropped drastically. Materials used in clothing were rich and detailed, especially in evening wear.

This style is very much inspired by Downton Abbey’s wealth. I like the way the cardigan and long skirt create a narrow silhouette, and the way black pearls subtly hint toward the era.

Gypsy Look

Everything off-shoulder was a big thing last summer, and the trend is still going strong. Though off-shoulder styles look lovely, they do come with one or two little issues. They tend to fall off, and when one leans over, they offer a good look at everything.

I planned this outfit to be free of both issues.

I made the off-shoulder top with chiffon sleeves last spring, and am still in the process of turning it into a pattern. For the photos, I wore the top over a basic spaghetti-strap top. I also wore a waist corselet over it. Now if the off-shoulder top slides out of place, I have the spaghetti-strapped one to trust. The corselet serves not only as a pretty detail, but to keep the top securely in place when leaning. With added safety-features, the off-shoulder top can actually be worn outside!

I paired the tops and corselet with my velvet skirt to achieve a modern gypsy-look. The large sleeves remind me of fortune tellers, so I wanted to incorporate some of their style. Instead of the romantic style with flowing hems and scarves, I chose a sleeker style. With less to look at, the outfit draws more attention to subtle details.

I felt really comfortable in this outfit, and almost wore it to my aunt’s birthday party. I decided against this only because the day was sunny and hot, and velvet would have been too warm.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about the velvet skirt looks!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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