Tag Archives: sewing

Black Taffeta Skirt

It’s my Birthday next Monday and to celebrate, I’ll be hosting a small party on Saturday. These two things combined meant that I needed a new skirt. I had some taffeta stashed, and since this is a pretty big Even Number -thing, it felt OK to sew a skirt with a nicer fabric. I decided to show you only sneak peaks of my black taffeta skirt today. It’s all wrinkly and needs a wash before  it can be worn. I want to wear in on Saturday, so I’ll showcase an outfit based on it next Tuesday.

Taffeta sounds super-fancy, and it can be that. When you think of taffeta, you probably see a starched evening gown that rustles softly on a red carpet. Taffeta is a twisted-woven fabric type which can be made with fibers varying from silk to polyester. A high-quality taffeta is made with natural fibers, and suitable for wedding dresses. My skirt is made with a “yeah, just going to a Goth-gig” -grade polyester. It has a lovely shine to it, but at 4€/meter, I wouldn’t be caught dead going to a proper party in this.

For my “Friends Only and To The Pub Later” -B-Day it’s perfect, though. I’m very likely to get champagne spilled on me, and this won’t mind.

On my Birthdays, I tend to make a point of wearing something that both looks and feels like me. This one doesn’t make an exception to the rule. I chose black taffeta because it is one of my favorite materials due to its shine and toughness. The style is also one of my favs.

The skirt is snug at the waist, and wide at the hem. I made it with a visible zipper in the center back seam, and a narrow waist band. One of the reasons I like poly taffeta so much, is how it gives seams a very crisp finish. If you concentrate just a little bit, achieving a professional result is really quite easy.

I worked the skirt using French seams. This technique gives the inside of a garment a tidy finish. I use it often with light fabrics and/or wide hems.

You’ve probably already guessed which pattern I used.

This black taffeta skirt is a mod based on our Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial. The skirt is exactly the same as in the pattern, only I made with just one layer and without the option to wear it hitched up.

The hem of the skirt has a wide ruffle. I used a strip of fabric to hide the seam, and sewed a narrow rolled hem to the skirt. This is the first garment in a long time I made using only my sewing machine!

I don’t yet know what I’m going to pair my black taffeta skirt with on Saturday, but I promise an outfit post for next week so stay tuned!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Velvet Skirt

On Friday, I shared with you two outfits based on our Lace Skirt. I also mentioned a mod I made on the pattern. Today, as promised, I’m featuring the mod, which is a long velvet skirt.

I had a bit of crushed velvet stashed. I kinda like it, but it can be a bit tricky. Made into a snug little dress it looks cheap, and made into a long, flowing garment it gathers up static electricity like a *****. I sorted out the dilemma by turning the velvet into a long but narrow skirt. I used The Lace Skirt Pattern as a guideline. The shape of the velvet skirt is exactly the same, only I made the hem longer.

Lengthening the hem of an A-lined skirt pattern is quite easy, and there’s loads of tutorials on how to do this. I actually just eyeballed the process, and the skirt turned out really nice.

My velvet skirt has a basic elastic waist, which is a little different from the original pattern. This kind of waist is comfy, but looks better hidden.

To add a bit of coverage to the flimsy velvet, I sewed a knee-length lining to the skirt.

For the photos, I created an outfit I actually wear quite a lot. I like to be comfortable and look presentable when working from home, so I wear long skirts and cute tops often. For this look, I chose the pink version of our Wrap-Cut Tops Pattern.

The pink top is made by upcycling a T-shirt with a funky print. I used the entire Tee for the front pieces, and cut the back piece from black cotton jersey. I really like the way the top turned out, and though pink isn’t my all-time-favourite, it’s ok in this piece.

Since the summer’s been pretty cold so far, I added sleeves to the outfit. I get cold easily, and sleeves keep me at least a little bit warmer.

I really like the way the skirt turned out. It’s comfy to wear, and it can even be worn out! I think I’m going to make another one to wear around the house, and save this one for partying ^^

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my velvet skirt! I’m going to feature two more outfits based on it on Friday, so stay tuned!

Until then.

Love,

Heather

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Black Skater Dress

This week has been about skater dresses, and the various forms they come in. Our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern is this week’s VIP-offer, and today, I wanted to show you guys a dress I made with the help of the pattern.

Our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern comes with three choices. You can choose from a basic skater dress, a Gothic version of the classic, or a heavily modded version that’s based on a store bought blouse. I made my dress along the last option.

I had a short peasant skirt. I liked the look of it, but it felt uncomfortable. I liked to wear it with blouses, and the waist of the skirt never really co-operated with me. It was always either riding up or sagging even though it was the right size. I was quite upset with the skirt. This week, I decided to Do Something to it.

I had a basic black blouse I kinda didn’t like either. It was a bit on the baggy side, and a bit plain. I took the two, and paired them up.

The Skater Dress Pattern offers more detailed instructions on how to do this.

I cut the top to length, joined the two at the waist, and added a zipper on the side. The result is quite nice. The top lost its bagginess, and the skirt its desire to venture out of place.

Black skater dress mod

A dress like this can work as is. All it really needs are tights and shoes. I wanted to add a little something to it, though.

Skater Dress with Silver Accessories

Two weeks or so ago, I happened upon H&Ms sale online. I’ve kinda been on the lookout for new shoes, so when I found a pair of silver pumps at H&M, I ordered them. I picked them up yesterday, and wanted to incorporate them into an outfit right away. I paired the shoes with my new black skater dress mod, my heart buckle belt, and a lace petticoat. This dress has a wide hem, and though the petticoat is a bit flimsy, it offers coverage during the inevitable Marilyn-moments.

Skater Dress and accessories

I added black pearls to the outfit along with large silver hoops.

This is another outfit that works well for casual dinners or going out for a pint. It’s comfy, cute, and easy to wear. Adding a cropped cardigan on top will offer extra warmth, and a silver purse would give the outfit more bling.

Black skater dress with silver accessories

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Skater Dress mod!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Black and White Dress

On Friday, I showed you a skater dress mod I made a while back. The Black and White Dress is made with an elastic bodice and a non-elastic hem. This goes against many sewing laws, but the result is both cute and comfy. The dress is loosely based on our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern.

I had a top that was too short, and a circle skirt that was too long. The top was a basic jersey top made by, as you can see, Link. I kinda liked it, but pairing a crop top with anything is really difficult for me. So I decided to add a hem to the top.

I took the circle skirt, and cut off the excess length at the waist. This made the skirt’s waist large enough for me to easily pass through. Then I ruched the waist, and serged to the hem of the top. The process so far took less than 45 minutes.

After I’d completed the merger, I found that the newly born dress needed something. I had a bit of fabric left from shortening the skirt. I decided to use it for cuffs. My original plan was to just combine the top and the skirt. Adding cuffs was a spontaneous idea I just ran with.

I sewed rectangle pieces to the tops sleeves, and top stitched them to give them a finished look. The waist of the dress is elastic because I used the elastic stitch and gathered the fabric. The cuffs however do not give one bit, so if you do this, keep in mind that pairing elastic and non-elastic materials will eat away the stretch! Measuring is also important: a cuff too tight will make the entire dress feel uncomfortable.

The cuffs looked really nice, and I made another snap-decision to give the dress a bit more colour. I cut a collar out of the remaining bits of fabric, and sewed it to the neckline. To keep the ends of the collar from flapping about, I hand-stitched them down.

The cuffs and collar tie the hem and bodice together, and give the dress a polished look. The waist is a bit loose because the skirt has quite a lot of fabric, but accessories fix that problem. An elastic belt or a corset hide the seam, and give the dress another detail.

For the photos, I paired the black and white dress with our Reversible Waist Corset and black pearls. To give the hem a bit more volume, I wore two petticoats under it. These are needed for other reasons, too, because…

… the dress flies.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Black and White Dress!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Elastic Corselet

On Tuesday, I showed you a crochet skirt I made while back. The skirt, being quite red, needed another garment to soften the break to black, so I paired it with my Embroidered Corselet. I’ve blogged about it before, but today I wanted to write a fresh post on the soft, elastic corselet.

elastic waist corselet, image one

The Embroidered Corselet is one of our first products. It was published back in 2014, I think. When the product was first launched, I managed to anger a few hardcore corset fans with it. I failed to emphasize enough that this product is not meant to be a real corset. It’s elastic, it’s comfy, and it’s the only similarity it bears to corsets is the shape of the pattern. Made with elastic fabrics and without a lacing, this corselets serves its purpose as a wide belt.

The incident is long gone and forgotten, but it still bugs me sometimes. Steel boned, unyielding corsets are lovely to look at, but often uncomfortable to wear. Choosing what to wear under a corset is serious business: a button or a zipper in the wrong place can leave a painful mark on the skin. I for one love corsets, but sometimes it’s nice to wear something softer.

The Embroidered Corselet was born out of that desire. Made with a corset pattern but with stretchy fabric, it’s comfortable and easy to wear.

Since the original version is quite red, I’ve made another one with the same pattern. I made a minor modification to it, though. To bring in a bit more of the corsetry-feel, I added a lacing to the back of it, and changed to my trade-mark criss-cross buttoning.

The fabric is a thick poly-blend with elastane knit into it. Back in the year I-forget, I got to make my friend a dress from the fabric. She let me have what was left over, and I used the scraps to create an elastic corselet. I thoroughly love the red and orange splatters on the fabric! Since the corselet has many shades of red, it goes with most of my red accessories. I especially like the way it matches with my Tropical Breeze Shawl. For this outfit, I paired the corselet and the shawl with an upcoming dress pattern. I’m hoping to get it published soon so stay tuned! I’m also planning to feature the corselet in Tuesday’s I Made This! -post along with a few outfit ideas based on it. 

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about The Embroidered Corselet.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Pretty Basic Jersey Dress

On Tuesday, I showed you some crochet projects I made just for the fun of it. Both the crochet dress and cardigan were paired with a red dress. Today, I wanted to share more info on the freshly published Pretty Basic Jersey Dress Sewing Pattern.

I like things that are easy to mix and match. Since dresses are my favourite thing to wear, I wanted to create a dress that goes with everything.

The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress is just that. It works with all kinds of cardigans and shrugs, can be paired with a belt of a corset, likes to hide under longer circle skirts and pose as a top, can even be made in mini-length and worn with leggings. With this dress, anything goes. And what’s best of all, it doesn’t really need to be accessorized. The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress is the kind of garment you can just pull on when you’re late for work, and still feel cute all day.

This style is designed to be made with viscose or cotton jersey. I chose solid colours for my two dresses. Black and red are the colours I wear most often, but this style works with other tones, too. Try a light beige to wear under lace garments. This will create a striking nude-look. Create the dress with a wild print for a fashion statement, or pick a light pastel to celebrate summer days in. Whatever your choice, this dress will love it.

The pattern is available in five sizes, from petite 32 to 40. It’s designed to be figure-hugging in a comfy way. The pattern comes with two neckline choices, and you can easily modify the hem and sleeves in length.

I hope you’ll enjoy The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress Sewing Pattern!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

PS. This dress, being freshly launched, will be the VIP special offer for two weeks in a row! If you haven’t already, be sure to join our mailing list to gain access for VIP-coupon codes.

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Reversible Corset

A while back, I mentioned a project I was working on. Finishing it took a bit longer than expected, but now I get to show you my Reversible Corset. It’s based on both The DeathRock Bustier, and The Reversible Waist Corset. I used the bustier pattern, and techniques from the waist corset.

I like to make clothes that can be paired with everything in my closet, and worn in many ways. This corset is a perfect example of both. It goes with all of my skirts and most of my dresses, and can actually be worn inside-out. It’s made with satin finished cotton and jacquard-print poly-blend. It has a zipper at the front, and lacing on the back which makes it easy to put on.

Since the corset is designed to be fully reversible, it doesn’t have a modesty panel. The lacing leaves my back partially exposed, so this style is best worn over a top or a dress. The DeathRock Bustier Pattern comes complete with a modesty flap, but working one into this mod of the original pattern was just too much for my spatial awareness.

This corset, along with The Reversible Waist Corset, is boned with spiral steel. I use it for most my corsets. It’s light and flexible, and makes corsets comfy to wear. I don’t go for tight-lacing, so light boning works well.

Getting the bone channels to look nice on both sides is surprisingly easy. All one needs is a bit of patience and accuracy.

I chose to create this corset with two black materials. Though the fabrics are close to each other in colour, they do bear a subtle difference in pattern. With two black options rolled into one, I get the most wear out of this corset.

For the photos, I paired the corset with a Victorian-inspired satin skirt made with two layers. The top layer of the skirt can be hitched up, which gives the style the versatility I love so much. The Victorian Skirt is available as a drafting tutorial.

I hope you enjoyed reading about my Reversible Corset!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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DeathRock Bustier Sewing Pattern

Corset patterns are abundant in the internet. A bit of googling will reveal an endless source of corset sewing patterns from Victorian to modern. Despite the fact that corset patterns are pretty much everywhere, I couldn’t find one that would suite me. I wanted a light overbust with little detail, a modesty panel, and a shape that would allow it to close almost entirely. Even after turning the internet upside-down I came up empty.

So I had to make the pattern myself.

The DeathRock Bustier is one of my favorite corset sewing patterns in our growing collection. It’s easy to make, comfy to wear, and it can be paired with almost anything. I like to wear mine with long skirts, but the DeathRock Bustier works wonders with short hems as well.

I’m currently in the process of making a new one with steel boning and a front zipper.

As I was cutting the corset, I couldn’t decide between two pretty fabrics. To give both of them a chance to shine, I chose to make the corset reversible. I used the exact same techniques as with the Reversible Waist Corset. With both sides pretty and tidy, the garment can actually be flipped inside out even in the middle of a night out.

Adding front closure to a light corset is really quite easy. Cut the front in two pieces instead of on fold leaving a bit of allowance, pop in a zipper, and sew bone channels on both sides. The solution makes any bustier easier to put on, and adds an extra detail.

My old DeathRock Bustier is pretty well worn. It’s boned with acrylic, and bears the marks of a lot of wear. It’s not beyond the point of salvation, and I’m thinking about changing it’s bones to spiral steel. The operation shouldn’t be too difficult, it just involves a lot of unpicking…

I hope you’ll enjoy the DeathRock Bustier Sewing Pattern, and have fun with modding it to your own taste!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Heather lying on forestfloor

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Loki Corset

Once upon a time three years ago, I got a bit carried away right before Halloween. I got a grand idea to go as Loki, and made a corset out of black fake leather and green cotton. I got sidetracked half-way through, and the corset was forgotten. I found my Loki Corset again a month or so ago, and decided to feature it in the I Made This! -section today.

I actually meant to do this yesterday, but I had the misfortune of coming down with a flu. I was literally too sick form a comprehensible sentence, but today I’m feeling much better. Not very pretty, though.

The Loki Corset is loosely based on the DeathRock Bustier Sewing Pattern. I used the pattern as a basic shape, and modified it with a heavy hand. I added a lot of details, steel boning, and front closure.

The criss-cross button closure is a thing I like to use when making light corsets that aren’t meant for tight-lacing. It has a unique look, and makes the garment comfy to wear. I most often use spiral steel boning which is flexible and forgiving, so this style of closure only works when you don’t want a very tight corset.

All the details of my Loki Corset are sewn on. I embellished each pair of pieces separately without a plan. I used a lot of piping for this too add as much green as I could. I wanted to avoid vertical lines, though, and decided to use black twill for bone channels. This solution gives more space to the diagonal embellishments.

The back of the corset has a very basic lacing. I like to use long satin ribbons with this one. They add a feminine detail to the style. The corset is complete with a modesty panel, naturally with my initials sewn into it.

I meant to wear my Loki Corset out on Friday, but a late dinner made me change my mind. This little mistake paired with the flu I got means you’ll have to settle for a headless shot of the corset being worn…

Though this piece hasn’t gotten much actual wear, I love it to bits. It’s comfy, unique, and pretty. I hope you enjoyed reading about it!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Our Favorite Hooded Patterns

Hooded sewing patterns come in many shapes and styles. My favorites are big ones, the kind you can really hide under. Three of our patterns include the large hood- feature.

One of our first sewing patterns was The Hooded Shrug. It’s made with thick jersey, and trimmed with lace. It has a flattering shape that’s easy to mix and match, and long sleeves with a trumpet shape. The shrug is closed with one button at the neck, and the large hood brings a touch of fairytale to the design. The Hooded Shrug is one of my all-time favorite designs, and I’m thinking of making a new one for the summer.

lace trimmed shrug with large hood, image one

Jersey is my absolute favorite material to both work with and wear. It’s easy to handle once you master it, comfy to wear, and very forgiving when worked with. I used super-light, almost see-through viscose jersey for our Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern. The dress has a wide hem and reverse puff sleeves along with a large hood. The dress is made with two layers of light jersey, which makes it warm during the winter.

You can mod the pattern by sewing the dress with one layer only, and even make the dress hoodless. Personally, though, I think that the hood kinda makes the dress.

The latest of our hooded designs is an asymmetrical wrap top. It’s made with light jersey, and has a layer of mesh under the wrap-cut front pieces. The top has a large hood made with two layers of fabric. This gives the hood a tidy inside so you can easily wear it down.

I adore this design, and I’m happy that it’s gotten a lot of positive feedback!

 

If you haven’t yet joined our mailing list, now’s a good time to do so. You’ll receive a 20% discount code as a welcome present, plus exclusive offers on select products. This weekend, these three hooded designs are on sale for all our VIPs!

I hope you’ll enjoy our Hooded Designs.

Until next time!

Love,

Heather

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