Tag Archives: patterns

Two Victorian Skirt Styles

On Tuesday, I showed you sneak peaks of a skirt I made for my Birthday. My black taffeta skirt is all done, but I’ll share it fully next week. Today, I wanted to share two outfits based on another skirt.

My taffeta skirt was made with the help of our Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial. I made mine with only one layer, and without the option to wear it hitched up. I have, however, made a full version of the Victorian Skirt, and it’s one of my favorite styles. The skirt is pretty and versatile, and I feel comfortable in it. It’s one of my go-to -garments that both look and feel like Me.

The Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial isn’t a pattern, and does not come with one. Instead, it will help you to draft your own pattern for your own measurements. It also comes with a fully illustrated sewing tutorial.

The skirt looks complicated, and can feel intimidating to make, but trust me,  it’s really super-easy!

Wearing this skirt is also easy. Despite the Victorian vibe that practically cries for a corset, the skirt actually likes casual tops, too.

Wrap-Cut Top with Victorian Vibe

Summer calls for lighter outfits, but it’s difficult to lighten a Gothic style. RomantiGoths have a pretty hard time during the warm season: layers of long hems and blouses and corsets can make us very uncomfortable. Popping on a black sundress and just saying F**k This to image is a perfectly acceptable option (I do it all the time) but sometimes it’s nice to go for a more distinct look. I wanted to create a summer style based on The Victorian Skirt.

I made this skirt with polyester satin, so it’s pretty hot during the summer. Using light cotton will make this skirt cooler to wear on warm days. It will look lovely made with cotton, but comfort-level will increase big time. To show you that the skirt doesn’t need to be worn with a corset, I paired it with the orange version of our Wrap-Cut Top. The asymmetric hem and lace create an interesting opposite to the romantic hems. The sleeveless top makes the outfit cool and comfy.

I added black pearls and bangles to this style. I wanted to concentrate on just two colors, and hesitated introducing a third one as jewelry. A two-toned style is elegant in an easy way.

Summer days are often sunny, and going out like this terrifies me. Getting a tan is not an option! When venturing out, I would add a sun hat (black, of course) or a parasol. And of course loads of sunblock!

The Secretary

Introducing masculine elements to feminine outfits is both popular and fun. I like to call this style the Secretary-look. This look works even better with a pencil skirt. Personally, I don’t feel comfortable in them, but they do look super-cute on everyone else.

The Secretary-look is easily achieved by pairing up a fitted blouse, a black tie, and a waist corset. A neat bun increases the effect of this style even further.

I chose to wear this with The Victorian Skirt because this is one of my signature styles. I love this outfit, and would wear it to a party any day.

But with socks and different shoes! Today was suffocatingly warm, and I could not face wearing socks with this skirt.

The Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial will be our VIP-offer for the next two weeks. On Tuesday, I’ll show you what I decided to pair my new skirt with for my B-Day party!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Black Taffeta Skirt

It’s my Birthday next Monday and to celebrate, I’ll be hosting a small party on Saturday. These two things combined meant that I needed a new skirt. I had some taffeta stashed, and since this is a pretty big Even Number -thing, it felt OK to sew a skirt with a nicer fabric. I decided to show you only sneak peaks of my black taffeta skirt today. It’s all wrinkly and needs a wash before  it can be worn. I want to wear in on Saturday, so I’ll showcase an outfit based on it next Tuesday.

Taffeta sounds super-fancy, and it can be that. When you think of taffeta, you probably see a starched evening gown that rustles softly on a red carpet. Taffeta is a twisted-woven fabric type which can be made with fibers varying from silk to polyester. A high-quality taffeta is made with natural fibers, and suitable for wedding dresses. My skirt is made with a “yeah, just going to a Goth-gig” -grade polyester. It has a lovely shine to it, but at 4€/meter, I wouldn’t be caught dead going to a proper party in this.

For my “Friends Only and To The Pub Later” -B-Day it’s perfect, though. I’m very likely to get champagne spilled on me, and this won’t mind.

On my Birthdays, I tend to make a point of wearing something that both looks and feels like me. This one doesn’t make an exception to the rule. I chose black taffeta because it is one of my favorite materials due to its shine and toughness. The style is also one of my favs.

The skirt is snug at the waist, and wide at the hem. I made it with a visible zipper in the center back seam, and a narrow waist band. One of the reasons I like poly taffeta so much, is how it gives seams a very crisp finish. If you concentrate just a little bit, achieving a professional result is really quite easy.

I worked the skirt using French seams. This technique gives the inside of a garment a tidy finish. I use it often with light fabrics and/or wide hems.

You’ve probably already guessed which pattern I used.

This black taffeta skirt is a mod based on our Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial. The skirt is exactly the same as in the pattern, only I made with just one layer and without the option to wear it hitched up.

The hem of the skirt has a wide ruffle. I used a strip of fabric to hide the seam, and sewed a narrow rolled hem to the skirt. This is the first garment in a long time I made using only my sewing machine!

I don’t yet know what I’m going to pair my black taffeta skirt with on Saturday, but I promise an outfit post for next week so stay tuned!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Velvet Skirt

On Friday, I shared with you two outfits based on our Lace Skirt. I also mentioned a mod I made on the pattern. Today, as promised, I’m featuring the mod, which is a long velvet skirt.

I had a bit of crushed velvet stashed. I kinda like it, but it can be a bit tricky. Made into a snug little dress it looks cheap, and made into a long, flowing garment it gathers up static electricity like a *****. I sorted out the dilemma by turning the velvet into a long but narrow skirt. I used The Lace Skirt Pattern as a guideline. The shape of the velvet skirt is exactly the same, only I made the hem longer.

Lengthening the hem of an A-lined skirt pattern is quite easy, and there’s loads of tutorials on how to do this. I actually just eyeballed the process, and the skirt turned out really nice.

My velvet skirt has a basic elastic waist, which is a little different from the original pattern. This kind of waist is comfy, but looks better hidden.

To add a bit of coverage to the flimsy velvet, I sewed a knee-length lining to the skirt.

For the photos, I created an outfit I actually wear quite a lot. I like to be comfortable and look presentable when working from home, so I wear long skirts and cute tops often. For this look, I chose the pink version of our Wrap-Cut Tops Pattern.

The pink top is made by upcycling a T-shirt with a funky print. I used the entire Tee for the front pieces, and cut the back piece from black cotton jersey. I really like the way the top turned out, and though pink isn’t my all-time-favourite, it’s ok in this piece.

Since the summer’s been pretty cold so far, I added sleeves to the outfit. I get cold easily, and sleeves keep me at least a little bit warmer.

I really like the way the skirt turned out. It’s comfy to wear, and it can even be worn out! I think I’m going to make another one to wear around the house, and save this one for partying ^^

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my velvet skirt! I’m going to feature two more outfits based on it on Friday, so stay tuned!

Until then.

Love,

Heather

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One Skirt – Two Looks

On Tuesday, I showed you a skirt I made based on our Lace Skirt Sewing Pattern. The pattern is on sale for all VIPs until June 12th. At first, I was going to do a one weekend flash sale with the skirt. On Wednesday, though, I remembered another mod I made with the pattern. I’m going to feature that next week, but today we’ll take a closer look at the original lace skirt pattern.

The Lace Skirt is made with non-elastic lace, and lined with contrast-coloured lining. I chose the combination of black and red. The skirt has an elastic waist which makes it both easy to make and comfy to wear, and a long, detachable belt that can be tied in many ways.

Today, I wanted to show you two outfits based on The Lace Skirt, a day style, and a look for the evening. I planned these outfits for a Friday, actually, and the scenario of having a date after work. Going home to change can be a luxury one can’t afford. On those days, it’s nice to freshen a work-look with details.

Lace Skirt for Casual Friday

Office dress codes can be demanding. The Lace Skirt worn with a basic top is an easy way to achieve a tidy, polished look. For this outfit, I chose a jersey top with a high collar and peephole. The top has long sleeves. When pushed up to the elbows, they won’t get in the way when typing, and, better yet, stay dry and clean when washing hands and having lunch. An elastic belt gives the outfit a modest detail, and red pumps add a splash of colour.

I wore my hair on a ponytail. A basic hair do draws away attention from the a-bit-too-fancy skirt, and makes the outfit office-friendly.

An A-lined lace skirt is office-friendly - on casual Fridays

Lace Skirt for Date Night

An evening out calls for something fancier. A jersey top can seem like a safe choice, but when paired with lace, it can go from OK to Oh Wow. For an evening look, I pulled down the top’s sleeves. They’re made with thumb holes which gives the top an interesting vibe. I removed the elastic belt, and replaced it with the original long lace belt. I tied the belt 2,5 times around my waist, pulled it wide, and secured it to place with a brooch. This makes the skirt appear to have a high waist, which gives the outfit a flattering empire line. The brooch adds a detail that’s both charming and decadent, and the red pumps make the outfit cute in a casual way.

I pulled my hair into a basic bun for this look. An updo makes any outfit look more glamorous, and most of all, makes you feel more special.

This outfit may not be the fanciest option ever, but it’s cute, comfy, and works wonderfully for an evening out on Friday. To transform from day to night, you’ll only need to pack the lace belt, a brooch, and some hair pins.

Worn with a wide belt, a simple skirt works for even a fancier dinner

I hope you’ve enjoyed my first Day To Night -post!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Black Skater Dress

This week has been about skater dresses, and the various forms they come in. Our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern is this week’s VIP-offer, and today, I wanted to show you guys a dress I made with the help of the pattern.

Our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern comes with three choices. You can choose from a basic skater dress, a Gothic version of the classic, or a heavily modded version that’s based on a store bought blouse. I made my dress along the last option.

I had a short peasant skirt. I liked the look of it, but it felt uncomfortable. I liked to wear it with blouses, and the waist of the skirt never really co-operated with me. It was always either riding up or sagging even though it was the right size. I was quite upset with the skirt. This week, I decided to Do Something to it.

I had a basic black blouse I kinda didn’t like either. It was a bit on the baggy side, and a bit plain. I took the two, and paired them up.

The Skater Dress Pattern offers more detailed instructions on how to do this.

I cut the top to length, joined the two at the waist, and added a zipper on the side. The result is quite nice. The top lost its bagginess, and the skirt its desire to venture out of place.

Black skater dress mod

A dress like this can work as is. All it really needs are tights and shoes. I wanted to add a little something to it, though.

Skater Dress with Silver Accessories

Two weeks or so ago, I happened upon H&Ms sale online. I’ve kinda been on the lookout for new shoes, so when I found a pair of silver pumps at H&M, I ordered them. I picked them up yesterday, and wanted to incorporate them into an outfit right away. I paired the shoes with my new black skater dress mod, my heart buckle belt, and a lace petticoat. This dress has a wide hem, and though the petticoat is a bit flimsy, it offers coverage during the inevitable Marilyn-moments.

Skater Dress and accessories

I added black pearls to the outfit along with large silver hoops.

This is another outfit that works well for casual dinners or going out for a pint. It’s comfy, cute, and easy to wear. Adding a cropped cardigan on top will offer extra warmth, and a silver purse would give the outfit more bling.

Black skater dress with silver accessories

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Skater Dress mod!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Velvet Print Corselet

Last time, I promised to show you the corselet featured in Friday’s post on Tuesday. Well, as we all know, life sometimes gets in the way of things. I was running all sorts of errands yesterday, and had to push this week’s first post forward a bit. But as promised, I’m still featuring the velvet print corselet!

This corselet is made with our Embroidered Corselet Pattern. The shape of the pieces is exactly the same, but I did make some modifications to the original pattern. Instead of embroidering the garment, I used a velvet printed fabric for this corselet. The material is elastic, and the print both looks and feels cool. I used the same fabric for binding and bone channels. A contrast colour might have made the end result too busy.

I also added a lace up back to the original style. This is a simple mod: instead of cutting the back piece on fold, cut it in two pieces. Use fusible interfacing to stabilize the edges, sew facings on them, and add eyelets. This makes the corselet look and feel a bit different, and allows it to be altered in size. Elastic garments rarely need to be let out, but it’s still a nice option.

I like to wear these kinds of corsets and corselets with dresses. This style doesn’t have a modesty panel, so it leaves the back partly exposed. It’s difficult to get a skirt waist to remain neatly in place. Dresses are easier in that sense. They offer full coverage, and don’t require tugging or adjusting.

For the photos, I paired my velvet print corselet with our Hooded Dress. The style is made with two layers of light jersey, and can be made with or without a hood. I prefer the hoodless style myself. I have a lot of hair, and it never co-operates with hoods. The basic style of the dress pleases me quite well, though. So much actually that I’ve made another one. I’ll feature that version in an upcoming Everyday With an Edge -post, so do stay tuned!

The Hooded Dress works really well with corset and corselets. It has flowing lines, and the waist sits a bit higher. To give the dress more shape, I wear it with belts and corsets. The reverse puff-sleeve, or bishop’s sleeve, gives the dress a soft, feminine feel. Made with a full length hem, this dress would bear a very Victorian vibe.

A two layer hem paired with a corselet offers a chance to drape the hem. For the photos, I tucked the top layer of the front hem under the corselet’s waist. This creates a draped detail to the hem, and alters the look of the dress in a subtle way. In a fully black dress this trick isn’t too noticeable. Making the dress in two colours and draping the hem creates a more striking effect.

Don’t forget that The Embroidered Corselet is this week’s VIP-offer! Join our mailing list to gain access to special offers.

Next time, we’ll continue with the velvet print corselet. In Friday’s post I’ll also be revealing our theme for the next two weeks!

Until then.

Love,

Heather

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Elastic Corselet

On Tuesday, I showed you a crochet skirt I made while back. The skirt, being quite red, needed another garment to soften the break to black, so I paired it with my Embroidered Corselet. I’ve blogged about it before, but today I wanted to write a fresh post on the soft, elastic corselet.

elastic waist corselet, image one

The Embroidered Corselet is one of our first products. It was published back in 2014, I think. When the product was first launched, I managed to anger a few hardcore corset fans with it. I failed to emphasize enough that this product is not meant to be a real corset. It’s elastic, it’s comfy, and it’s the only similarity it bears to corsets is the shape of the pattern. Made with elastic fabrics and without a lacing, this corselets serves its purpose as a wide belt.

The incident is long gone and forgotten, but it still bugs me sometimes. Steel boned, unyielding corsets are lovely to look at, but often uncomfortable to wear. Choosing what to wear under a corset is serious business: a button or a zipper in the wrong place can leave a painful mark on the skin. I for one love corsets, but sometimes it’s nice to wear something softer.

The Embroidered Corselet was born out of that desire. Made with a corset pattern but with stretchy fabric, it’s comfortable and easy to wear.

Since the original version is quite red, I’ve made another one with the same pattern. I made a minor modification to it, though. To bring in a bit more of the corsetry-feel, I added a lacing to the back of it, and changed to my trade-mark criss-cross buttoning.

The fabric is a thick poly-blend with elastane knit into it. Back in the year I-forget, I got to make my friend a dress from the fabric. She let me have what was left over, and I used the scraps to create an elastic corselet. I thoroughly love the red and orange splatters on the fabric! Since the corselet has many shades of red, it goes with most of my red accessories. I especially like the way it matches with my Tropical Breeze Shawl. For this outfit, I paired the corselet and the shawl with an upcoming dress pattern. I’m hoping to get it published soon so stay tuned! I’m also planning to feature the corselet in Tuesday’s I Made This! -post along with a few outfit ideas based on it. 

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about The Embroidered Corselet.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Two Styles for Pretty Basic Jersey Dress

On Tuesday, I promised to share outfit ideas based on The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress. I’ve decided one post isn’t enough, so more will come next week!  Playing models is loads of fun so I’ve ended up with too much ideas for just one post.

As you may have noticed, this post is the first in a new category called Everyday With an Edge. Posts under this label will focus on outfits and styling while featuring one or four of our designs. I hope you’ll like them!

LBD with Heart-Buckle Belt

The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress is my favourite thing to mix and match. It’s a clean slate, which makes it super-easy to style. The best part about this little black dress is that it doesn’t really need much.

I chose to pair the dress with basic black tights and a belt. The belt’s made with elastic lace and a heart-shaped buckle. The belt’s really cute, and adds a feminine touch to any outfit. Paired with a basic dress it accentuates the waist, and gives a bit more structure to the style.

The belt would have looked nice on its own, but I wanted to add more silver to the outfit. I wore a heavy wrist-band, lots of narrow rings, and my scissor-necklace.

Every time I wear the scissors, someone cracks the “oh, it’s because you sew” -joke. Old as it is, I always laugh politely.

When wearing necklaces, I like to pull my hair up. This way, it doesn’t cover the necklace.

Draped Red Dress

When I was little, I used to love trying on Mom’s jewellery. She had one ring that was overwhelmingly beautiful to an eight-year-old me.

Mom noticed, naturally, how much I loved the ring, and ten years later, she gave it to me. The ring still is as lovely to me as it was so many years ago. I wanted to build this outfit around the ring.

The ring is from the sixties, and goes pretty well with a brooch I have. As dresses were super-short in the sixties, I chose to use the brooch to shorten the hem of the red dress with.

Doing this is really simple: gather the hem up in folds, and secure to place with a brooch. This creates an asymmetrical shape, and can be used as an effect on both short and long hems.

To avoid showing too much leg, I wore a black skirt under the dress.

The outfit needed a bit more black, so I popped on my Reversible Waist Corset‘s black side. I topped the style with red pumps that match the dress.

Both of these outfits are ideal for shopping or casual dinners. They’re cute, comfy, and bear a bit of unique edge.

I hope you’ve enjoyed the first Everyday With an Edge -post!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Pretty Basic Jersey Dress

On Tuesday, I showed you some crochet projects I made just for the fun of it. Both the crochet dress and cardigan were paired with a red dress. Today, I wanted to share more info on the freshly published Pretty Basic Jersey Dress Sewing Pattern.

I like things that are easy to mix and match. Since dresses are my favourite thing to wear, I wanted to create a dress that goes with everything.

The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress is just that. It works with all kinds of cardigans and shrugs, can be paired with a belt of a corset, likes to hide under longer circle skirts and pose as a top, can even be made in mini-length and worn with leggings. With this dress, anything goes. And what’s best of all, it doesn’t really need to be accessorized. The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress is the kind of garment you can just pull on when you’re late for work, and still feel cute all day.

This style is designed to be made with viscose or cotton jersey. I chose solid colours for my two dresses. Black and red are the colours I wear most often, but this style works with other tones, too. Try a light beige to wear under lace garments. This will create a striking nude-look. Create the dress with a wild print for a fashion statement, or pick a light pastel to celebrate summer days in. Whatever your choice, this dress will love it.

The pattern is available in five sizes, from petite 32 to 40. It’s designed to be figure-hugging in a comfy way. The pattern comes with two neckline choices, and you can easily modify the hem and sleeves in length.

I hope you’ll enjoy The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress Sewing Pattern!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

PS. This dress, being freshly launched, will be the VIP special offer for two weeks in a row! If you haven’t already, be sure to join our mailing list to gain access for VIP-coupon codes.

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Reversible Corset

A while back, I mentioned a project I was working on. Finishing it took a bit longer than expected, but now I get to show you my Reversible Corset. It’s based on both The DeathRock Bustier, and The Reversible Waist Corset. I used the bustier pattern, and techniques from the waist corset.

I like to make clothes that can be paired with everything in my closet, and worn in many ways. This corset is a perfect example of both. It goes with all of my skirts and most of my dresses, and can actually be worn inside-out. It’s made with satin finished cotton and jacquard-print poly-blend. It has a zipper at the front, and lacing on the back which makes it easy to put on.

Since the corset is designed to be fully reversible, it doesn’t have a modesty panel. The lacing leaves my back partially exposed, so this style is best worn over a top or a dress. The DeathRock Bustier Pattern comes complete with a modesty flap, but working one into this mod of the original pattern was just too much for my spatial awareness.

This corset, along with The Reversible Waist Corset, is boned with spiral steel. I use it for most my corsets. It’s light and flexible, and makes corsets comfy to wear. I don’t go for tight-lacing, so light boning works well.

Getting the bone channels to look nice on both sides is surprisingly easy. All one needs is a bit of patience and accuracy.

I chose to create this corset with two black materials. Though the fabrics are close to each other in colour, they do bear a subtle difference in pattern. With two black options rolled into one, I get the most wear out of this corset.

For the photos, I paired the corset with a Victorian-inspired satin skirt made with two layers. The top layer of the skirt can be hitched up, which gives the style the versatility I love so much. The Victorian Skirt is available as a drafting tutorial.

I hope you enjoyed reading about my Reversible Corset!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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