Tag Archives: patterns

Stripy Wrist Warmers

In the world of crafting, left-over yarn is a rule. It’s always around, and sometimes, it’s difficult to find a use for little balls and skeins. As I was given an opportunity to write a guest post for Craftic, I chose to create these cute, stripy wrist warmers to share. The wrist warmers require basic skills in both knitting and crocheting. Stitches used are very simple, so I would label this as a beginner level project. 

stripy wrist warmers worked in black and purple

Materials

  • sport weight yarn in two tones. The amount of yarn needed depends on how long you wish to make the wrist warmers. For the black and purple ones, I worked 10 contrast colored stripes and used 50 grams (142 yards) of yarn in total.

  • double-pointed needles size 3,5mm/US 4

  • crochet hook size 3,5mm/US 4 and 4mm/US 6

  • tapestry needle for weaving in ends

Notes

The wristwarmers come in three sizes, S (M), and L. Size S suits an arm of 20 cm/ 7.8 inches in diameter, size M 22 cm/ 8.6 inches, and size L 24 cm/ 9.45 inches. Gauge (taken from a wristwarmer while it’s worn) is 8 stitches and 24 rows in a 5 cm x 5 cm / 2” x 2” square.

Abbreviations

K – knit

P – purl

DC – double crochet

* * – repeat

Pattern

Cast on 40 (44) 48 stitches on DPNs with black yarn, divide them eavenly, and join to knit in the round. The wristwarmers are worked in *K2, P2* -rib up until the crochet cuff.

Counting in the foundation row, work four rows of rib with black yarn. Switch to purple, and work two rows. Alternating the stripe pattern of *four rows in black, two rows in purple*, work in the round until the wristwarmer is approx 15cm/ 6 inches long. Finish with a black stripe.

Switch to the smaller crochet hook. From the beginning of the first row, pick up two stitches onto your hook. Crochet them together with a slip stitch, and chain four. In between of the two stitches you just crocheted together, double crochet.

DC the next two stitches together, chain two, and DC in between the two stitches crocheted together. Continue like this through the row.

Switch to hook size 4mm/ US 6.

Row 1: Into each arch formed by two chain stitches, DC three times.

Row 2-5: Using slip stitches, move to the middle DC of the first group. Chain two, and DC twice. *DC three times into the middle stitch of the next group.* Slip stitch to close the round.

Row 6: Using slip stitches, move to the middle DC of the first group. Chain two, and DC four times. Single crochet in between groups. *DC five times into the middle stitch of the next group, single crochet in between groups.* Slip stitch to close the round.

Cast off, and weave in ends.

stripy wrist warmers worked in double rib and crochet lace

 I hope you’ll enjoy The Stripy Wrist Warmers Knit/Crochet Pattern!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

SkaterDress

On Tuesday, I showed you a cute little dress I made in less than two hours. I based it loosely on our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern, and today, I’d like to write more about the pattern.

The skater dress and its variations are among the most popular dress styles. With a fitted bodice and a flared hem, what’s not to love! The basic skater dress pattern can be modded beyond belief. With our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern, I did just that. Along with the basic style, our skater dress sewing pattern includes a hooded, Gothic-inspired style, and a variation based on a store-bought blouse. I for one like to sew a pattern over and over again if the style pleases me. Adding details and little mods can change up a basic pattern quite a bit. This pattern is designed with the re-sewing option in mind.

The example of our basic style is made with long sleeves, and a smooth hem and bodice. I used viscose jersey for this style, and I really like that choice. A soft fabric makes the dress comfy for everyday wear.

The basic style is super-easy to accessorize. It goes with pretty much anything! Try adding a belt to the mix, wear the dress over a top, or pop a cardigan over it. You can change it up when sewing, too: make the hem longer or shorter, mix jersey with elastic lace, or pick a patterned material. The basic style really loves its variations, so don’t hesitate to go wild with it!

The basic skater dress bends to all sorts of ways. When making this pattern, I wanted to see just how much can be done with it. For the Gothic version of the pattern, I added bell sleeves, a laced up bodice, and a large hood. All of these elements together make the dress a Gothic girls dream. This style can also be taken apart for a more subdued look. Try sewing a basic dress with a hood, or adding the lacing to the basic style. Change the fabric from velvet to jersey, and the dress changes altogether!

This style is a bit more challenging to accessorize due to the amount of detail. The dress likes jewelry and petticoats, and of course cute leg-wear paired with wicked boots.

The last style is my personal favorite. It’s made taking advantage of upcycled materials. For it, you’ll need a fitted blouse, and a hem’s worth of fabric. The model dress has a three-layer hem: tulle, and two kinds of fabric. The top layer is cut into an asymmetric shape to give the voluminous hem a bit more drama.

This style can be paired with corsets and ties which give the dress an androgynous vibe.

The pattern includes a hem, two options for bodice, sleeves that can be made long or short or topped with a circular cuff, and a hood. All of these parts fit together, so you can just take your pick of the elements you’d like to use, and make your dream come true. I’m currently dreaming of a full-length skater dress…

I hope you’ll enjoy The Skater Dress Sewing Pattern!

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

DeathRock Bustier Sewing Pattern

Corset patterns are abundant in the internet. A bit of googling will reveal an endless source of corset sewing patterns from Victorian to modern. Despite the fact that corset patterns are pretty much everywhere, I couldn’t find one that would suite me. I wanted a light overbust with little detail, a modesty panel, and a shape that would allow it to close almost entirely. Even after turning the internet upside-down I came up empty.

So I had to make the pattern myself.

The DeathRock Bustier is one of my favorite corset sewing patterns in our growing collection. It’s easy to make, comfy to wear, and it can be paired with almost anything. I like to wear mine with long skirts, but the DeathRock Bustier works wonders with short hems as well.

I’m currently in the process of making a new one with steel boning and a front zipper.

As I was cutting the corset, I couldn’t decide between two pretty fabrics. To give both of them a chance to shine, I chose to make the corset reversible. I used the exact same techniques as with the Reversible Waist Corset. With both sides pretty and tidy, the garment can actually be flipped inside out even in the middle of a night out.

Adding front closure to a light corset is really quite easy. Cut the front in two pieces instead of on fold leaving a bit of allowance, pop in a zipper, and sew bone channels on both sides. The solution makes any bustier easier to put on, and adds an extra detail.

My old DeathRock Bustier is pretty well worn. It’s boned with acrylic, and bears the marks of a lot of wear. It’s not beyond the point of salvation, and I’m thinking about changing it’s bones to spiral steel. The operation shouldn’t be too difficult, it just involves a lot of unpicking…

I hope you’ll enjoy the DeathRock Bustier Sewing Pattern, and have fun with modding it to your own taste!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Heather lying on forestfloor

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Our Favorite Hooded Patterns

Hooded sewing patterns come in many shapes and styles. My favorites are big ones, the kind you can really hide under. Three of our patterns include the large hood- feature.

One of our first sewing patterns was The Hooded Shrug. It’s made with thick jersey, and trimmed with lace. It has a flattering shape that’s easy to mix and match, and long sleeves with a trumpet shape. The shrug is closed with one button at the neck, and the large hood brings a touch of fairytale to the design. The Hooded Shrug is one of my all-time favorite designs, and I’m thinking of making a new one for the summer.

lace trimmed shrug with large hood, image one

Jersey is my absolute favorite material to both work with and wear. It’s easy to handle once you master it, comfy to wear, and very forgiving when worked with. I used super-light, almost see-through viscose jersey for our Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern. The dress has a wide hem and reverse puff sleeves along with a large hood. The dress is made with two layers of light jersey, which makes it warm during the winter.

You can mod the pattern by sewing the dress with one layer only, and even make the dress hoodless. Personally, though, I think that the hood kinda makes the dress.

The latest of our hooded designs is an asymmetrical wrap top. It’s made with light jersey, and has a layer of mesh under the wrap-cut front pieces. The top has a large hood made with two layers of fabric. This gives the hood a tidy inside so you can easily wear it down.

I adore this design, and I’m happy that it’s gotten a lot of positive feedback!

 

If you haven’t yet joined our mailing list, now’s a good time to do so. You’ll receive a 20% discount code as a welcome present, plus exclusive offers on select products. This weekend, these three hooded designs are on sale for all our VIPs!

I hope you’ll enjoy our Hooded Designs.

Until next time!

Love,

Heather

Lovelace

This fall, I found yellow mystery yarn in my stash. I don’t usually go for yellow, but this wool blend Spoke to me. The yarn announced its will to become a pair of cabled gloves. It had a quite loud and very demanding voice, so I set out to fulfill its dream. After a few little mishaps, the yellow yarn turned into intricate gloves knitting pattern I named Lovelace.

Most knitting patterns I create are targeted for beginners. I like to keep things simple, and to make patterns that are quick and easy to knit.

This one, though, came out a bit more demanding. I labeled it under Intermediate, but I do believe it’s border-lining Advanced… This pattern features rib, lace columns, cables, reverse stockinette, and an Indian thumb gusset with a cable worked into it. The design is full of detail, which makes the gloves remarkably pretty.

This pattern demands some skills in knitting. In addition to basic stitches, decreases and increases, you’ll need to have knowledge of cabling and glove construction. If you do know the basics of both, the pattern in itself isn’t that hard create.

Lovelace are full of intricate detail on the outside, but the inside of the gloves is smooth. I wanted them to be a pleasure to wear, both in the aesthetic and practical sense. Reverse stockinette makes cables and lace pop out, and keeps the inside of the snug-fitting gloves smooth. Though it does take a bit more effort, I do believe it’s worth it.

The Lovelace Pattern was released in February. It was test knit right after, and now it has been approved by a community of knitters. You can find it also on Ravelry along with the beautiful projects my testers created. Before seeing The Lovelace Gloves worked in pink, I never believed how much the choice of color can affect the design!

Lovelace Gloves are designed for sport weight wool blend. You can use other materials, such as merino or alpaca blends, as long as the gauge matches. These gloves might look lovely worked with cotton, too. Winter’s starting to be almost over, and more breathable materials will make these gloves nice to wear as spring draws near.

I hope you’ll like The Lovelace Pattern as much I as enjoyed creating it!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

PS. If you haven’t already, be sure to join our mailing list. I’ll be featuring one product each week, and offering a special discount on it for all VIPs! This week it’s Lovelace!

Long Scarves

After finishing the Black and Blue Gloves I wrote about last week, I still had plenty of yarn left. I wanted to use it on an accessory that would go with the Pretty Basic Blazer. Shawls and snoods were out of the question along with wrist-warmers and gloves. Scarves, however, seemed quite interesting. They’re easy to wear with pretty much anything, and I didn’t really have a long crochet scarf. As I needed a quick and easy project, I set to creating a long, long crochet scarf.

The yarn is a combination of two strands of acrylic, one black and one petrol blue. Together, they make one yarn thick enough to be worked with a 5mm/US 8 hook. I used a super-simple stitch which creates a nice, airy surface. Both of the yarns I used are upcycled, so getting more was out of the question.

The scarf grew long, and I still had yarn. I really wanted to get rid of it all, so I worked a shell edge around the scarf. It created a nice, feminine border to a pretty basic scarf.

The long crochet scarf was a really nice accessory. So nice, in fact, that I needed another one.

I found some black cotton in my stash, and used it for a black version of the simple scarf. I embellished the black scarf with crochet flowers, attaching them to both sides of the scarf’s long ends. On a style like this, it’s nice to get both sides to look pretty. As the scarf moves, all of it will be visible.

These both styles are based on The Hooded Scarf Crochet Pattern. There are two version of the pattern out there. A free version can be found on Blogger. That one is a recipe-style, and not very detailed. A paid version can be bought here at heatherwielding.com and Ravelry. It’s priced at 1€ here, and a bit higher on Ravelry due to their fees. The paid version is more detailed, and it includes instructions on how to crochet the flowers on the scarf. It also includes recipe-style instructions on how to create the long crochet scarves featured in this post.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my crochet scarves!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Lune

Lune is a knitting pattern for a striped, crescent scarf. It’s worked in garter stitch, and has a narrow crochet border. Lune is unisex, and entirely beginner-friendly. Lune can be modded in size to work as a scarf or a shawl.

Lune is a knitting pattern for a crescent shawl

I didn’t really plan for Lune to happen. After working on The Lovelace Gloves, I wanted to knit something very simple on large needles. In a way, Lune was a comfort-knit. As rewarding it is to create something very intricate, a fast-paced project that requires very little concentration is just and only pure fun.

For me, Lune was fun to knit. The feel of the yarns was nice and fluffy, large needles made the project come together in very little time, and not having to purl or read a chart was relaxing for a change.

Lune was born on a whim. I went through my stash, and found two balls of mystery yarn in black and green. The color-combo brought Loki to my mind. I immediately knew I wanted to use the yarns on scarf, as long as possible, and easy to mix and match.

The shape of the scarf was also quickly decided. I wanted to find the easiest possible way to create a crescent scarf in order to make the pattern as beginner-friendly as possible.

I set to work, and decided Lune needed a little something-something to make it special.

Garter stitch stays flat without ribbed edges. It’s ideal for scarfs and shawls: it looks nice, has a lot of elasticity, and stays put on its own. I chose to finish Lune with a narrow crochet edge not for practical reasons, but to give it a unique look.

Working on Lune was an absolute pleasure. I enjoyed every moment of it so much I’m actually thinking about casting on another one in black and purple.

I hope you’ll love The Lune Knitting Pattern, too!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

PS. If you haven’t already, be sure to join our mailing list. I’ll be featuring one product each week, and offering a special discount on it for all VIPs!

Hitched Hems

Dresses are my favorite things to wear. They’re easy to mix and match, and never out of place. Styles to choose from are endless, and materials used vary from cotton to velvet to leather. Personally, I like dresses that are both versatile and classic. One of my favorite designs in our collection is The Princess and Keyhole Dress. It features puff-sleeves, a keyhole neck, and hitched hems.

princess-seamed dress, one

The Princess and Keyhole Dress is best made with non-elastic materials such as cotton. The dress has princess seams, so it’s shaped at the bodice, and a wide hem. Puff-sleeves make it comfy to wear, but the key element is the hem.

The dress is made with channels on the hem’s seams. With ribbons slid into the channels, the hem can be modified in both length and shape. The dress can be worn long, pulled up at the front, or gathered into a short version. I like to use the ribbons to shorten the hem at the front to show off a colorful peticoat.

The shape of the dress finds its origin in the Victorian era, when hems were wide, ruffled, and often gathered. I’ve used the element of hitched hems in an earlier design as well.

princess-seamed dress, four

The Victorian Skirt is made with two layers. The botton layer features a wide ruffle, and the upper layer can be hitched up with ribbons. The Victorian Skirt is made with a very simple pattern, so it’s available as a drafting tutorial only. This allows everyone to create a skirt with their own, unique measurements.
Hitched hems are an easy way to create a versatile dress. The Victorian Skirt can be worn with both layers smooth and long, pulled up evenly, gathered at the front, or even arranged into a bustle-like shape. I like to wear mine gathered evenly, and I’ve even made a version with ribbon channels on both layers of the skirt.

black satin skirt, Victorian style

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about our Hitched Hems -sewing patterns.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Fishnet Top

Red, upcycled cotton wanted desperately to be a sweater, something light, airy, and darkly inclined. After a few moments of contemplation, I turned it into a mesh top. Naturally, the process resulted in the Fishnet Top Knitting Pattern.

Fishnet Top Knitting Pattern can be made with any yarn as long as the gauge matches

Following along the lines of our previously published Fishnet Gloves Knitting Pattern, this pattern is androgynous and completely beginner-friendly. In my opinion, the world lacks in basic knitting patterns suitable for those just starting with the wonderful craft. I like to offer simple patterns as well to help those still increasing their knitting skills. This pattern is worked in straight lines, in the round, and is made with easy, repetitive stitch patterns.

The Fishnet Top Knitting Pattern includes sizes XS-L along with an option for a version made with ribbed neckline, hem, and cuffs. The sweater has a low, scooped neckline which makes it both trendy and comfortable to wear. The hem can be knit to any length: it can be made long, or left at a cropped line. The sleeve length is also entirely optional. The model sweater is made with long sleeves, but a short sleeved version works as well.

The model sweater is knit with upcycled cotton. This yarn choice makes the style cool for the summer. The Fishnet Top Knitting Pattern can be worked with any yarn as long as the gauge matches. It can be made with cotton, wool blend, or even acrylic. Try self-striping or self-patterning yarns for an even funkier look!

Fishnet Top Knitting Pattern is worked without increases

Since the fishnet sweater is simple, it can be worn with many kinds of outfits which makes it quite versatile. I paired it with a pleated mini, but the sweater also works with jeans and long skirts. It can also be worn over a dress to bring extra warmth to cold nights.

I hope you’ll enjoy our Fishnet Top Knitting Pattern!

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

Fishnet Top Knitting Pattern suits both him and her

Hooded Dress

Super light jerseys can be too thin to be worn on their own. I solved the problem by creating a two-layer dress. Styled with a large hood, our Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern is designed to make everyday wonderful.

Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern comes with a large hood

Our Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern has a wide hem, a fitted bodice, and reverse puff sleeves. Made with two layers of fabric, it can be made monochrome, or with contrasting colors. Using a single tone makes the dress modest and easy to pair with different kinds of accessories. Choosing two colors turns it up a notch, bringing a bit of flare to the simple design.

This style works best when made with light cotton or viscose jerseys, but poly-blends can work as well. Try using a thicker fabric for the shell, and topping it with a see-through chiffon or even lace. Keep in mind, though, that this dress needs to be sewn with elastic fabrics in order to make it as comfy as possible!

Our Hooded Dress has a wide hem, and made with light fabrics, it can have a tendency of flying. It’s a smart idea to pair the dress with a tight petticoat to avoid showing too much. Our Garter Petticoat works wonders with this style, and helps keep overknee-socks up during the winter.

Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern allows you to create a two-layer dress

For this dress, I wanted to take advantage of my favorite sleeve shape. The reverse puff sleeve enjoyed popularity in the sixties, and pops up every now and again. In my opinion, it’s one of the most flattering sleeves. It’s easy to pair with 3/4 cardigans, and works wonderfully with shawls of all shapes. In a feminine dress, it emphasizes the female form.

Our Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern was originally designed to be hooded, but to give it more versatility, we’ve added an alternate neckline to the style so the dress can be made hoodless as well. Don’t forget, with two layers of fabric, you can play with the shape of the hem as much as you like!

I hope you’ll enjoy our Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern.

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern also has a hoodless option