Tag Archives: dresses

Black Skater Dress

This week has been about skater dresses, and the various forms they come in. Our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern is this week’s VIP-offer, and today, I wanted to show you guys a dress I made with the help of the pattern.

Our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern comes with three choices. You can choose from a basic skater dress, a Gothic version of the classic, or a heavily modded version that’s based on a store bought blouse. I made my dress along the last option.

I had a short peasant skirt. I liked the look of it, but it felt uncomfortable. I liked to wear it with blouses, and the waist of the skirt never really co-operated with me. It was always either riding up or sagging even though it was the right size. I was quite upset with the skirt. This week, I decided to Do Something to it.

I had a basic black blouse I kinda didn’t like either. It was a bit on the baggy side, and a bit plain. I took the two, and paired them up.

The Skater Dress Pattern offers more detailed instructions on how to do this.

I cut the top to length, joined the two at the waist, and added a zipper on the side. The result is quite nice. The top lost its bagginess, and the skirt its desire to venture out of place.

Black skater dress mod

A dress like this can work as is. All it really needs are tights and shoes. I wanted to add a little something to it, though.

Skater Dress with Silver Accessories

Two weeks or so ago, I happened upon H&Ms sale online. I’ve kinda been on the lookout for new shoes, so when I found a pair of silver pumps at H&M, I ordered them. I picked them up yesterday, and wanted to incorporate them into an outfit right away. I paired the shoes with my new black skater dress mod, my heart buckle belt, and a lace petticoat. This dress has a wide hem, and though the petticoat is a bit flimsy, it offers coverage during the inevitable Marilyn-moments.

Skater Dress and accessories

I added black pearls to the outfit along with large silver hoops.

This is another outfit that works well for casual dinners or going out for a pint. It’s comfy, cute, and easy to wear. Adding a cropped cardigan on top will offer extra warmth, and a silver purse would give the outfit more bling.

Black skater dress with silver accessories

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Skater Dress mod!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Black and White Dress

On Friday, I showed you a skater dress mod I made a while back. The Black and White Dress is made with an elastic bodice and a non-elastic hem. This goes against many sewing laws, but the result is both cute and comfy. The dress is loosely based on our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern.

I had a top that was too short, and a circle skirt that was too long. The top was a basic jersey top made by, as you can see, Link. I kinda liked it, but pairing a crop top with anything is really difficult for me. So I decided to add a hem to the top.

I took the circle skirt, and cut off the excess length at the waist. This made the skirt’s waist large enough for me to easily pass through. Then I ruched the waist, and serged to the hem of the top. The process so far took less than 45 minutes.

After I’d completed the merger, I found that the newly born dress needed something. I had a bit of fabric left from shortening the skirt. I decided to use it for cuffs. My original plan was to just combine the top and the skirt. Adding cuffs was a spontaneous idea I just ran with.

I sewed rectangle pieces to the tops sleeves, and top stitched them to give them a finished look. The waist of the dress is elastic because I used the elastic stitch and gathered the fabric. The cuffs however do not give one bit, so if you do this, keep in mind that pairing elastic and non-elastic materials will eat away the stretch! Measuring is also important: a cuff too tight will make the entire dress feel uncomfortable.

The cuffs looked really nice, and I made another snap-decision to give the dress a bit more colour. I cut a collar out of the remaining bits of fabric, and sewed it to the neckline. To keep the ends of the collar from flapping about, I hand-stitched them down.

The cuffs and collar tie the hem and bodice together, and give the dress a polished look. The waist is a bit loose because the skirt has quite a lot of fabric, but accessories fix that problem. An elastic belt or a corset hide the seam, and give the dress another detail.

For the photos, I paired the black and white dress with our Reversible Waist Corset and black pearls. To give the hem a bit more volume, I wore two petticoats under it. These are needed for other reasons, too, because…

… the dress flies.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Black and White Dress!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Two SkaterDress Looks

On Wednesday, I featured my velvet print corselet. Today, I’m shifting from corsets to next week’s theme which is… skater dresses!

I for one really like the basic idea behind the skater dress. A fitted bodice paired with a short, wide hem is super-easy to mix and match, and pretty perfect for all sorts of casual occasions. I wouldn’t wear these dresses to a wedding, but definitely for a dinner with friends or family, or a to a fun day of shopping.

These two outfits are based on a skater dress mod I will be featuring more closely in next week’s I Made This! -post.

Are The Eighties Back Again!

Well, for a Goth, the eighties never left. I thoroughly love the frill and femininity of that era, and like to incorporate it to outfits whenever I can. Long necklaces and hats were a big thing back then, and I enjoy both.

For this look, I paired my velvet print corselet with a skater dress made in two colours, and a poofy petticoat. I accessorized the outfit with black pearls and a bowler hat.

Black and Red Skater Dress with an eighties-vibe

The black and red dress is made to resemble a skater dress. It has a fitted bodice made with cotton jersey, and a wide, two layer hem. Both elements are trimmed with lace. The hem of the dress is non-elastic, which breaks most rules of sewing. This is why I will be returning to the dress in next week’s posts.

I like the way the corselet ties the colours of the dress together, again offering a soft fade-out in between. The outfit is also really comfy, too, thanks to the elasticity of the materials.

Black and Red Skater Dress paired with velvet print corselet

 Black and White

The second dress is made with the same principle, an elastic bodice paired with a non-elastic hem. The hem of this dress is a full circle. The hem has a wide ruffle, and it flies like crazy. This is why I always wear a tight, knee-length skirt with this dress! Marilyn-moments are lovely, but I don’t want the whole town seeing my knickers.

I made this dress with a collar and cuffs to match the hem. This solution ties the colours together in a subtle way. The waist does appear a bit harsh, though, since it has a seam. I like to hide it with a belt. An elastic belt adds a cute detail to the dress, and feels comfortable.

Black and White Skater Dress

I paired this black and white skater dress with my bloodstone rings and pendant. This particular stone dyes the water red while it’s ground into shape. It seems to be crying tears of blood then, which is why it’s called the bloodstone.

I can’t remember where I got these, but both the pendant and the rings are fully made of stone. If you drop them, they break. They’re pretty, though, and look nice with black and white outfits.

The style of this dress kinda reminds me of the fifties. I’m pretty much as far from a rockabella as a girl can be, but I do love the way ladies dressed in the fifties. Hems were wide, hair was high, and every detail was oh so pretty.

I kinda wish fashion was still like that, pretty and controlled. I may be getting old because the yoga pants -style of today sort of gives me a headache. It’s a good thing we all can dress the way we want, and just look the other way if something doesn’t please us.

Black and White Skater Dress with collar and cuffs

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my skater dresses!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

PS: don’t forget to join our mailing list to gain access to VIP-offers! Next week, The Skater Dress Pattern is going on sale!

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Velvet Print Corselet

Last time, I promised to show you the corselet featured in Friday’s post on Tuesday. Well, as we all know, life sometimes gets in the way of things. I was running all sorts of errands yesterday, and had to push this week’s first post forward a bit. But as promised, I’m still featuring the velvet print corselet!

This corselet is made with our Embroidered Corselet Pattern. The shape of the pieces is exactly the same, but I did make some modifications to the original pattern. Instead of embroidering the garment, I used a velvet printed fabric for this corselet. The material is elastic, and the print both looks and feels cool. I used the same fabric for binding and bone channels. A contrast colour might have made the end result too busy.

I also added a lace up back to the original style. This is a simple mod: instead of cutting the back piece on fold, cut it in two pieces. Use fusible interfacing to stabilize the edges, sew facings on them, and add eyelets. This makes the corselet look and feel a bit different, and allows it to be altered in size. Elastic garments rarely need to be let out, but it’s still a nice option.

I like to wear these kinds of corsets and corselets with dresses. This style doesn’t have a modesty panel, so it leaves the back partly exposed. It’s difficult to get a skirt waist to remain neatly in place. Dresses are easier in that sense. They offer full coverage, and don’t require tugging or adjusting.

For the photos, I paired my velvet print corselet with our Hooded Dress. The style is made with two layers of light jersey, and can be made with or without a hood. I prefer the hoodless style myself. I have a lot of hair, and it never co-operates with hoods. The basic style of the dress pleases me quite well, though. So much actually that I’ve made another one. I’ll feature that version in an upcoming Everyday With an Edge -post, so do stay tuned!

The Hooded Dress works really well with corset and corselets. It has flowing lines, and the waist sits a bit higher. To give the dress more shape, I wear it with belts and corsets. The reverse puff-sleeve, or bishop’s sleeve, gives the dress a soft, feminine feel. Made with a full length hem, this dress would bear a very Victorian vibe.

A two layer hem paired with a corselet offers a chance to drape the hem. For the photos, I tucked the top layer of the front hem under the corselet’s waist. This creates a draped detail to the hem, and alters the look of the dress in a subtle way. In a fully black dress this trick isn’t too noticeable. Making the dress in two colours and draping the hem creates a more striking effect.

Don’t forget that The Embroidered Corselet is this week’s VIP-offer! Join our mailing list to gain access to special offers.

Next time, we’ll continue with the velvet print corselet. In Friday’s post I’ll also be revealing our theme for the next two weeks!

Until then.

Love,

Heather

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Two Styles for Pretty Basic Jersey Dress

On Tuesday, I promised to share outfit ideas based on The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress. I’ve decided one post isn’t enough, so more will come next week!  Playing models is loads of fun so I’ve ended up with too much ideas for just one post.

As you may have noticed, this post is the first in a new category called Everyday With an Edge. Posts under this label will focus on outfits and styling while featuring one or four of our designs. I hope you’ll like them!

LBD with Heart-Buckle Belt

The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress is my favourite thing to mix and match. It’s a clean slate, which makes it super-easy to style. The best part about this little black dress is that it doesn’t really need much.

I chose to pair the dress with basic black tights and a belt. The belt’s made with elastic lace and a heart-shaped buckle. The belt’s really cute, and adds a feminine touch to any outfit. Paired with a basic dress it accentuates the waist, and gives a bit more structure to the style.

The belt would have looked nice on its own, but I wanted to add more silver to the outfit. I wore a heavy wrist-band, lots of narrow rings, and my scissor-necklace.

Every time I wear the scissors, someone cracks the “oh, it’s because you sew” -joke. Old as it is, I always laugh politely.

When wearing necklaces, I like to pull my hair up. This way, it doesn’t cover the necklace.

Draped Red Dress

When I was little, I used to love trying on Mom’s jewellery. She had one ring that was overwhelmingly beautiful to an eight-year-old me.

Mom noticed, naturally, how much I loved the ring, and ten years later, she gave it to me. The ring still is as lovely to me as it was so many years ago. I wanted to build this outfit around the ring.

The ring is from the sixties, and goes pretty well with a brooch I have. As dresses were super-short in the sixties, I chose to use the brooch to shorten the hem of the red dress with.

Doing this is really simple: gather the hem up in folds, and secure to place with a brooch. This creates an asymmetrical shape, and can be used as an effect on both short and long hems.

To avoid showing too much leg, I wore a black skirt under the dress.

The outfit needed a bit more black, so I popped on my Reversible Waist Corset‘s black side. I topped the style with red pumps that match the dress.

Both of these outfits are ideal for shopping or casual dinners. They’re cute, comfy, and bear a bit of unique edge.

I hope you’ve enjoyed the first Everyday With an Edge -post!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Pretty Basic Jersey Dress

On Tuesday, I showed you some crochet projects I made just for the fun of it. Both the crochet dress and cardigan were paired with a red dress. Today, I wanted to share more info on the freshly published Pretty Basic Jersey Dress Sewing Pattern.

I like things that are easy to mix and match. Since dresses are my favourite thing to wear, I wanted to create a dress that goes with everything.

The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress is just that. It works with all kinds of cardigans and shrugs, can be paired with a belt of a corset, likes to hide under longer circle skirts and pose as a top, can even be made in mini-length and worn with leggings. With this dress, anything goes. And what’s best of all, it doesn’t really need to be accessorized. The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress is the kind of garment you can just pull on when you’re late for work, and still feel cute all day.

This style is designed to be made with viscose or cotton jersey. I chose solid colours for my two dresses. Black and red are the colours I wear most often, but this style works with other tones, too. Try a light beige to wear under lace garments. This will create a striking nude-look. Create the dress with a wild print for a fashion statement, or pick a light pastel to celebrate summer days in. Whatever your choice, this dress will love it.

The pattern is available in five sizes, from petite 32 to 40. It’s designed to be figure-hugging in a comfy way. The pattern comes with two neckline choices, and you can easily modify the hem and sleeves in length.

I hope you’ll enjoy The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress Sewing Pattern!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

PS. This dress, being freshly launched, will be the VIP special offer for two weeks in a row! If you haven’t already, be sure to join our mailing list to gain access for VIP-coupon codes.

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Crochet Dress and Cardigan

A while back, I mentioned a little crochet project I was working on. Cotton and lace is a combo I really like, so one thing led to another. Instead of one lace garment, I now have two!

I found a basic pattern for a lace dress on Novita’s site many, many years ago. I loved it, but didn’t dare try it. After gathering more experience and courage in crocheting, I went back looking for the crochet dress pattern. Novita had taken it down, but I managed to dig up a chart for the lace repeat. I memorized it, tried to make a dress, and failed miserably. This spring, I tried again.

The lace repeat is relatively simple, but still lovely to look at. It’s airy and light, and reminds me of spiderwebs.

I used two hook sizes with the dress, 3mm and 3,5m. Upping the hook size at the hip gave the hem of the dress a bit more room and saved me from adding more stitches. This style is started at the empire line, and worked both up and down from there. The sleeves are worked separately, and the dress has a zipper in the back.

The dress turned out really pretty. I can’t remember how long I’ve wanted to make one, and now that I have, I want another one!

Crochet Dress worked with black cotton

After finishing the crochet dress, I sill had some yarn left. As spring was coming along, I figured I needed more lace. I didn’t have a cute, comfy cardigan to wear out, so I decided to need one.

I cast on another lace project, and before I knew it, I had my cute cardie.

Like the dress, this one is worked both up and down from the empire line. I added a triple crochet row there just in case I wanted to slip a contrast coloured satin ribbon in.

I left the cardie pretty short, and only used a 3mm hook.

I plan to wear this cardigan with dresses only, so I felt comfortable leaving the hem open. The cardigan closes only at the bust, which makes it perfect to wear even with waist corsets. Bright colours push through the lace, and make the cardigan super-cute over red and blue dresses.

The red dress will soon be published as a pattern. I’m planning to add more items to the Pretty Basics, and the figure-hugging dress will be the first in line. I’m also planning to start posting outfit photos on IG, so be sure to follow me there, too!

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my crochet dress and cardigan!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

EDIT: After a bit more searching, I found the pattern! It’s in Finnish only, but there are really clear charts.

Pattern

Charts

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Why I Love to Crochet

Lace is one of my favorite things to wear. It’s feminine and delicate, but often a bit too fancy for everyday clothes.

Crochet garments can be made with all kinds of materials. I like to play with cotton and large hooks. This combo makes lace cardigans and dresses suitable for almost any everyday occasion, from shopping to casual dinners. Using simple lace patterns also serves to enhance the wearability of crochet garments.

Most of the things I crochet are black. Two of my latest crochet projects are a dress and cardigan both made with the same lace. I found the pattern for both on Novita’s website in the year I-forget, must have been 2006ish, but sadly, they’ve since given the site a make-over. That means the patterns can’t be found anywhere. I’ve literally turned the internet upside-down in search of it, but came out empty handed. The lace repeat is lovely, though, and it’s found its place among my favorites. It’s airy, it’s easy, and it totally works for an office-cardie.

I’m hoping to show you the finished items soon!

Crochet lace can look intimidating. For me, it did seem like an impossible thing to master. I was literally afraid of trying for years, but once I did, it dawned on me that most lace is created with basic stitches. Know how to chain, single- and double crochet, and you’re good to go. Even the simplest stitches can make an intricate surface. This is clearly seen with Evan Plevinski’s Elise Shawl. The pattern doesn’t have a difficult stitch in it, and the result is just beautiful.

I’ve made two so far, a red one for Mom, and a purple one for me. Mine turned out really big, though I haven’t gotten around to properly blocking it!

Lace is a versatile texture. It ‘s beautiful and feminine, and easier to create than one imagines. It brings a touch of luxury into everyday life, and that’s the reason why I love crocheting so much.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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SkaterDress

On Tuesday, I showed you a cute little dress I made in less than two hours. I based it loosely on our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern, and today, I’d like to write more about the pattern.

The skater dress and its variations are among the most popular dress styles. With a fitted bodice and a flared hem, what’s not to love! The basic skater dress pattern can be modded beyond belief. With our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern, I did just that. Along with the basic style, our skater dress sewing pattern includes a hooded, Gothic-inspired style, and a variation based on a store-bought blouse. I for one like to sew a pattern over and over again if the style pleases me. Adding details and little mods can change up a basic pattern quite a bit. This pattern is designed with the re-sewing option in mind.

The example of our basic style is made with long sleeves, and a smooth hem and bodice. I used viscose jersey for this style, and I really like that choice. A soft fabric makes the dress comfy for everyday wear.

The basic style is super-easy to accessorize. It goes with pretty much anything! Try adding a belt to the mix, wear the dress over a top, or pop a cardigan over it. You can change it up when sewing, too: make the hem longer or shorter, mix jersey with elastic lace, or pick a patterned material. The basic style really loves its variations, so don’t hesitate to go wild with it!

The basic skater dress bends to all sorts of ways. When making this pattern, I wanted to see just how much can be done with it. For the Gothic version of the pattern, I added bell sleeves, a laced up bodice, and a large hood. All of these elements together make the dress a Gothic girls dream. This style can also be taken apart for a more subdued look. Try sewing a basic dress with a hood, or adding the lacing to the basic style. Change the fabric from velvet to jersey, and the dress changes altogether!

This style is a bit more challenging to accessorize due to the amount of detail. The dress likes jewelry and petticoats, and of course cute leg-wear paired with wicked boots.

The last style is my personal favorite. It’s made taking advantage of upcycled materials. For it, you’ll need a fitted blouse, and a hem’s worth of fabric. The model dress has a three-layer hem: tulle, and two kinds of fabric. The top layer is cut into an asymmetric shape to give the voluminous hem a bit more drama.

This style can be paired with corsets and ties which give the dress an androgynous vibe.

The pattern includes a hem, two options for bodice, sleeves that can be made long or short or topped with a circular cuff, and a hood. All of these parts fit together, so you can just take your pick of the elements you’d like to use, and make your dream come true. I’m currently dreaming of a full-length skater dress…

I hope you’ll enjoy The Skater Dress Sewing Pattern!

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

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Cute SkaterDress

As you may have noticed, I really like dresses. I have literally dozens of dresses, and I hardly ever wear anything but dresses. They’re so easy to pull on and accessorize. And the best part is, despite the fact that dresses are ridiculously comfy, wearing one makes you look chic no matter what. Though I have plenty of dresses, I keep making more. Last week, I made a cute skaterdress by just combining a spaghetti-strap top to a hem I quickly sewed up.

The story of the dress goes like this.

I had a top dug up from who-knows-where. It was a bit too short to be worn with a skirt, but I really liked the color and the velvet print. My website was down last week, and to make myself feel better, I decided to treat myself to a new dress. The top would serve as its foundation.

top on its way to becoming a cute skaterdress

I had black viscose jersey stashed up. I used some of it to sew an A-lined, wide hem for the top. Patterning and cutting were done using the proven method of “it’s just jersey, what could possibly go wrong!”

… nothing major, just had to take the waist in a little.

hem waiting to be attached

After sewing up the hem, I attached the pieces at the waist. When doing this, you’ll want to make certain the seam will sit at the narrowest part of the waist, and that it’s a snug fit. Otherwise the seam will bulge.

almost there!

I did a basic rolled hem on the dress. It’s a quick, easy finish for a casual dress. It works really well on jersey, since it won’t eat at the elasticity of the fabric, but lives along with the material. For everyday dresses meant for nothing fancier than a dinner at the local pub it’s the perfect choice. If you’re making something more special, try trimming hems with lace.

I really like the way my dress turned out. I wore it last week, and paired it with a mesh top and a tulle petticoat beneath, and a basic elastic belt over the seam.

cute skater dress all done!

I hope you enjoyed reading about my new cute skaterdress!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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