Granny Square with Pretty Basic Jersey Dress

Sometimes, even the best laid plans fail. I planned to finish the pattern for The Pretty Basic Lace Top by today. A very sudden and quite high fever messed up my schedule, so the launch of the new pattern has been delayed. Today, I’m going to show you an outfit I wore out a while back instead. The Lace Top Pattern will come out just as soon as I can get it finished, and I’ll try to do outfit posts with it. As a part of The Pretty Basics, the top is easy to pair with almost anything.

I like simple, comfortable styles. Jersey dresses are my favorites, and I wear them almost daily. For this look, I chose the red version of our Pretty Basic Jersey Dress, and filet crochet cardigan.

Soft, flowing lines are easy to wear, and flatter almost any body type. This cardigan is my safety-blanket, and I wear it quite often. It keeps me warm, and since it is so soft and square, it can be arranged into many shapes.

This cardigan is pretty much just a big, filet crochet square with sleeves. It has a huge collar that can double as a hood, and wide front pieces that can be closed with removable buttons. I like to wear mine open, but closing the cardigan can be a smart idea especially on colder days. The day I wore this outfit was a bit on the cold side. Had I gone further than to the post office to pick up a package (of fabric, naturally) I would have regretted not adding another layer.

The outfit was super-comfortable. The cardigan’s soft, flowing lines always cheer me up, and The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress is pretty perfect for running errands. It’s long enough to be comfy, and wide enough not to ride up.

The Granny Square Cardigan Crochet Pattern is available as a free download. I do hope you’ll take advantage of the pattern, and showcase your creations!

Next week, I’m hoping to release The Pretty Basic Lace Top, and to share outfits based on it.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather 

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Over and Under – Three ways to rock a dress

Our featured pattern for this week is The Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern. The dress is made with two layers of light viscose jersey, and topped with a large hood. The pattern comes with a hoodless variation as well, and you can make the dress with only one layer of fabric if you so choose. I’ve made two mods of this pattern. I showcased both dresses last week, and the last few posts have featured different dress styles based on the black and blue twins.

I thought I’d make one Everyday With an Edge -post with these dresses before bringing our next week’s featured product. It’s going to be a flash-offer on a brand new pattern, so be prepared for next week!

In Tuesday’s post, I built two outfits with the same key elements. The first look continues along those lines, and features this summer’s hit product, the fishnet tights.

GrannySquare over Blue Dress

Being cold is one of my least favorite things. I don’t go out without a cardigan unless it’s super-warm! I created the first outfit keeping that in mind.

I used to live in a really cold house. During that time, I crocheted a huge square with sleeves. I wore it nearly daily, and after moving out, the cardigan was forgotten for a while. I dug it out again last spring, and found it to be both comfy and warm on cooler summer days. The GrannySquare Gardigan is available as a free crochet pattern.

I wear the cardigan quite often when stepping out. I love the ragged, flowing edges of it, and the way it allows colorful dresses to shine through it. The blue dress looks especially cute under it.

I completed the outfit with black fishnets and strappy sandals. I also added a lace choker. I made the choker a few days ago since they are starting to be IN again. I took a piece of elastic lace, and sewed a snap fastener to its ends. The project is super-fast and simple, and results in a cute accessory with a vintage vibe.

Party Look

I won’t deny the fact that we go out a lot. Life would be horridly dull without partying, so I wanted to turn the long-sleeved dress into something a bit more nightclub-appropriate.

Clubs are often crowded. I didn’t want to add a whole bunch of accessories that can get caught or fall off. Instead, I pushed the cuffs of the sleeves up to my elbows. This simple trick both shortens the sleeves, and enhances their shape. The over-all look of the dress changes a bit, to a more playful direction. I added a narrow belt, and tied its free end around itself. The belt sits a bit lower on the hips, and the looped end pulls it to an asymmetrical shape.

The silver pumps repeat the studs on the belt, and large silver hoops tie the details together.

I really like this easy, simple look. It’s quick to create, comfy to wear, and even cool on a sweaty dance floor. Dress styles such as this are my go to choices on Friday nights.

Flying Velvet

I have a lot of clothes with a high wardrobe malfunction risk. One of these “be very careful in this” -garments is a long wrap skirt made with velvet. I picked it up from a flea market, and though it is one of my favorite skirts, I never feel entirely comfortable in it.

I wanted to find a solution to my little dilemma, and decided to pair the skirt with the dress!

Tied over a knee-length dress, the wrap skirt will still fly open at an opportune gust of wind, but now it won’t matter. The dress beneath adds a safety feature, and serves as a cute top.

A accessorized this look only with a silver necklace and silver pumps.

The outfit is really nice, I like this look, but… thanks to a dress and a long layer of velvet, it’s warm. I’d feel uncomfortable wearing this to a club, though it does look pretty. My eyebrows would melt and I don’t even paint them on.

I hope you’ve had fun reading about these dress styles. Next week, I get to show you brand new dresses, including the one I actually wore for my Birthday party!

Until then.

Love,

Heather

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Red Crochet Skirt

Once upon a time, I decided to want a red crochet skirt. This happened before I made the black dress I showed you a while back. For this skirt, I used the same lace repeat. I really like this lace, it’s easy to hook, and lovely to look at. The repeat is only three rows high, so it’s also easy to memorize.

I crocheted the skirt with Novita’s long-gone Kotiväki. It’s a pretty basic mercerized cotton suitable for hook sizes 2,5mm to 3,5mm. I like working with larger hooks, so I liked the yarn. The consistency pleased me as well. I like natural fibers, and cotton works nice with lace. It also gives crochet projects really pretty stitch definition.

Finding a substitute for Kotiväki has proven surprisingly difficult. Fingering weight blends are numerous, but cotton is harder to come by. I guess I’ll have to settle for blends in the future.

Red Crochet Skirt Detail

I wanted my skirt to be tight, but not too tight to walk in. I wanted it long and narrow and fitted at the hip.

Achieving this was easier than I thought. I started at the waist with a 2,5mm hook and worked my way down upping hook size twice. This made the skirt widen without increases. When the skirt reached my knees, I changed to hook size 4mm, and worked the rest of the hem.

I like the way the skirt turned out. It doesn’t have a lining because I want to wear it with both short and long underskirts. Versatility is important to me, and this skirt provides it.

Crochet Skirt over Bodycon Dress

Crochet garments, especially lacey ones, are light and see-through. Petticoats are in order when wearing a lace skirt. For this outfit, I paired the red crochet skirt with The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress. Worn under the skirt, the dress provides coverage. It also doubles as a top.

To cover up the waist of the skirt, I wore The Embroidered Waist Corselet. This light-weight corselet is made with elastic material, and features buttons at the front, and light embroidery on the sides. Contrast coloured bone channels continue the red hem a bit higher, and make it blend into the top without a clear line. I like to do this when wearing colours. Combining two colours that are quite far from each other, it feels nice to bind them together with another garment. A hard break of colour in any outfit can seem a bit harsh.

Wearing a dress under a skirt comes with one more bonus feature: you won’t have a shirt tail to worry about.

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my red crochet skirt!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Tropical Breeze

Once upon a time, I decided to need a really big crochet shawl to wear over basic dresses. During the summer, I like to grab a cardigan or shawl when venturing outside just in case the weather acts up. Cotton is my favourite material for shawls. It’s heavy, it’s nice to work with, and it isn’t too warm for the summer.

I had upcycled cotton stashed, so I decided to use it for a shawl. The yarn’s a bit too thick to work as a dress, but pretty perfect for shawls. For the pattern, I went to Drops. I’ve worked this style before, and really it. The pattern repeat is easy so it’s perfect for Flix-binging, and the simple lace works with all kinds of outfits. The pattern is called Tropical Breeze, and it’s available on Drop’s site.

This shawl is worked up from the lowest point. This gives it a nice triangle shape with a wide wingspan. The shawl is finished with a border, which always gives me a headache. This time, I only messed it up a little, and chose to leave the mistakes in. Maybe I’ll remember to concentrate better when reading instructions next time!

I really like the way the shawl turned out. It’s big, it’s heavy, it goes with everything, and the shade of red is just to my liking. I’m hoping this one will get a lot of wear in the warmer months.

My Tropical Breeze Shawl goes well with The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress. The shawl is a perfect cover up for the figure-hugging dress, and gives the black version a lot of colour. I like the combo of black and red, and the feel of the heavy shawl has something very decadent about it.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my crochet shawl!

Next time, I’m hoping to show you a few outfit ideas based on the Pretty Basic Jersey Dress. Until then.

Love,

Heather

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Crochet Dress and Cardigan

A while back, I mentioned a little crochet project I was working on. Cotton and lace is a combo I really like, so one thing led to another. Instead of one lace garment, I now have two!

I found a basic pattern for a lace dress on Novita’s site many, many years ago. I loved it, but didn’t dare try it. After gathering more experience and courage in crocheting, I went back looking for the crochet dress pattern. Novita had taken it down, but I managed to dig up a chart for the lace repeat. I memorized it, tried to make a dress, and failed miserably. This spring, I tried again.

The lace repeat is relatively simple, but still lovely to look at. It’s airy and light, and reminds me of spiderwebs.

I used two hook sizes with the dress, 3mm and 3,5m. Upping the hook size at the hip gave the hem of the dress a bit more room and saved me from adding more stitches. This style is started at the empire line, and worked both up and down from there. The sleeves are worked separately, and the dress has a zipper in the back.

The dress turned out really pretty. I can’t remember how long I’ve wanted to make one, and now that I have, I want another one!

Crochet Dress worked with black cotton

After finishing the crochet dress, I sill had some yarn left. As spring was coming along, I figured I needed more lace. I didn’t have a cute, comfy cardigan to wear out, so I decided to need one.

I cast on another lace project, and before I knew it, I had my cute cardie.

Like the dress, this one is worked both up and down from the empire line. I added a triple crochet row there just in case I wanted to slip a contrast coloured satin ribbon in.

I left the cardie pretty short, and only used a 3mm hook.

I plan to wear this cardigan with dresses only, so I felt comfortable leaving the hem open. The cardigan closes only at the bust, which makes it perfect to wear even with waist corsets. Bright colours push through the lace, and make the cardigan super-cute over red and blue dresses.

The red dress will soon be published as a pattern. I’m planning to add more items to the Pretty Basics, and the figure-hugging dress will be the first in line. I’m also planning to start posting outfit photos on IG, so be sure to follow me there, too!

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my crochet dress and cardigan!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

EDIT: After a bit more searching, I found the pattern! It’s in Finnish only, but there are really clear charts.

Pattern

Charts

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Why I Love to Crochet

Lace is one of my favorite things to wear. It’s feminine and delicate, but often a bit too fancy for everyday clothes.

Crochet garments can be made with all kinds of materials. I like to play with cotton and large hooks. This combo makes lace cardigans and dresses suitable for almost any everyday occasion, from shopping to casual dinners. Using simple lace patterns also serves to enhance the wearability of crochet garments.

Most of the things I crochet are black. Two of my latest crochet projects are a dress and cardigan both made with the same lace. I found the pattern for both on Novita’s website in the year I-forget, must have been 2006ish, but sadly, they’ve since given the site a make-over. That means the patterns can’t be found anywhere. I’ve literally turned the internet upside-down in search of it, but came out empty handed. The lace repeat is lovely, though, and it’s found its place among my favorites. It’s airy, it’s easy, and it totally works for an office-cardie.

I’m hoping to show you the finished items soon!

Crochet lace can look intimidating. For me, it did seem like an impossible thing to master. I was literally afraid of trying for years, but once I did, it dawned on me that most lace is created with basic stitches. Know how to chain, single- and double crochet, and you’re good to go. Even the simplest stitches can make an intricate surface. This is clearly seen with Evan Plevinski’s Elise Shawl. The pattern doesn’t have a difficult stitch in it, and the result is just beautiful.

I’ve made two so far, a red one for Mom, and a purple one for me. Mine turned out really big, though I haven’t gotten around to properly blocking it!

Lace is a versatile texture. It ‘s beautiful and feminine, and easier to create than one imagines. It brings a touch of luxury into everyday life, and that’s the reason why I love crocheting so much.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Stripy Wrist Warmers

In the world of crafting, left-over yarn is a rule. It’s always around, and sometimes, it’s difficult to find a use for little balls and skeins. As I was given an opportunity to write a guest post for Craftic, I chose to create these cute, stripy wrist warmers to share. The wrist warmers require basic skills in both knitting and crocheting. Stitches used are very simple, so I would label this as a beginner level project. 

stripy wrist warmers worked in black and purple

Materials

  • sport weight yarn in two tones. The amount of yarn needed depends on how long you wish to make the wrist warmers. For the black and purple ones, I worked 10 contrast colored stripes and used 50 grams (142 yards) of yarn in total.

  • double-pointed needles size 3,5mm/US 4

  • crochet hook size 3,5mm/US 4 and 4mm/US 6

  • tapestry needle for weaving in ends

Notes

The wristwarmers come in three sizes, S (M), and L. Size S suits an arm of 20 cm/ 7.8 inches in diameter, size M 22 cm/ 8.6 inches, and size L 24 cm/ 9.45 inches. Gauge (taken from a wristwarmer while it’s worn) is 18 stitches and 24 rows in a 5 cm x 5 cm / 2” x 2” square.

Abbreviations

K – knit

P – purl

DC – double crochet

* * – repeat

Pattern

Cast on 40 (44) 48 stitches on DPNs with black yarn, divide them eavenly, and join to knit in the round. The wristwarmers are worked in *K2, P2* -rib up until the crochet cuff.

Counting in the foundation row, work four rows of rib with black yarn. Switch to purple, and work two rows. Alternating the stripe pattern of *four rows in black, two rows in purple*, work in the round until the wristwarmer is approx 15cm/ 6 inches long. Finish with a black stripe.

Switch to the smaller crochet hook. From the beginning of the first row, pick up two stitches onto your hook. Crochet them together with a slip stitch, and chain four. In between of the two stitches you just crocheted together, double crochet.

DC the next two stitches together, chain two, and DC in between the two stitches crocheted together. Continue like this through the row.

Switch to hook size 4mm/ US 6.

Row 1: Into each arch formed by two chain stitches, DC three times.

Row 2-5: Using slip stitches, move to the middle DC of the first group. Chain two, and DC twice. *DC three times into the middle stitch of the next group.* Slip stitch to close the round.

Row 6: Using slip stitches, move to the middle DC of the first group. Chain two, and DC four times. Single crochet in between groups. *DC five times into the middle stitch of the next group, single crochet in between groups.* Slip stitch to close the round.

Cast off, and weave in ends.

stripy wrist warmers worked in double rib and crochet lace

 I hope you’ll enjoy The Stripy Wrist Warmers Knit/Crochet Pattern!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Long Scarves

After finishing the Black and Blue Gloves I wrote about last week, I still had plenty of yarn left. I wanted to use it on an accessory that would go with the Pretty Basic Blazer. Shawls and snoods were out of the question along with wrist-warmers and gloves. Scarves, however, seemed quite interesting. They’re easy to wear with pretty much anything, and I didn’t really have a long crochet scarf. As I needed a quick and easy project, I set to creating a long, long crochet scarf.

The yarn is a combination of two strands of acrylic, one black and one petrol blue. Together, they make one yarn thick enough to be worked with a 5mm/US 8 hook. I used a super-simple stitch which creates a nice, airy surface. Both of the yarns I used are upcycled, so getting more was out of the question.

The scarf grew long, and I still had yarn. I really wanted to get rid of it all, so I worked a shell edge around the scarf. It created a nice, feminine border to a pretty basic scarf.

The long crochet scarf was a really nice accessory. So nice, in fact, that I needed another one.

I found some black cotton in my stash, and used it for a black version of the simple scarf. I embellished the black scarf with crochet flowers, attaching them to both sides of the scarf’s long ends. On a style like this, it’s nice to get both sides to look pretty. As the scarf moves, all of it will be visible.

These both styles are based on The Hooded Scarf Crochet Pattern. There are two version of the pattern out there. A free version can be found on Blogger. That one is a recipe-style, and not very detailed. A paid version can be bought here at heatherwielding.com and Ravelry. It’s priced at 1€ here, and a bit higher on Ravelry due to their fees. The paid version is more detailed, and it includes instructions on how to crochet the flowers on the scarf. It also includes recipe-style instructions on how to create the long crochet scarves featured in this post.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my crochet scarves!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Pink Cthulhu

For me, Tuesday was one of those days when you’re feeling a bit under the weather. To lift my spirits, I went through my stash to find a cute yarn to crochet something quick and easy with, I came out with pink cotton, and decided I wanted to make another Cthulhu to keep company to the green one I’d made before.

I know these guys are usually green, but who knows, maybe this Elder God happened upon a mysterious mutation of Upgrade Cuteness Level to the Max.

Amigurumis are still an area not-that-well-known to me. I know the basics, naturally, but still need patterns in order to work a design with more details.

Early last year, I crocheted a green Cthulhu with the help of Rural Rebellion’s pattern. As I searched for it today, I noted that their website had been taken down. After a bit of searching, I found the pattern I’d used before. It can be found here, but I don’t know if the link will be live for long.

I really like the pattern, it’s well-written and clear, and I sincerely hope the website will be renewed soon.

For the pink Cthulhu, I used two strands of pink upcycled cotton. It’s a really light shade of pink which reminds me of cotton candy. The tone is pretty, but when I try to imagine the yarn as a garment, something hurts and says NO. For amigurumis, though, it’s pretty perfect.

I cast the Cthulhu on at around 1pm, and cast off at around 9pm. I took breaks to do a bit of work and to say bye to the better half who went off on a business trip, and to cook dinner for myself. Working on the Cthulhu took, to my reckoning, about five hours.

The finished product created using a 5mm (US8) hook is about 13 cm high. The Cthulhu has curling tentacles, which were really fun to work with, and wings attached to its back.

For the eyes, I used black plastic buttons. I sewed them on while working on the head, so I could still easily reach the inside of the work.

I really like the way the Pink Cthulhu turned out. Though the color is a bit unconventional. I think it adds to the original design’s chubby cuteness.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Pink Cthulhu!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Heather’s Basic Blazer

Filet crochet is one of my favorite crochet techniques. It’s easy, quick to master, and lovely to look at. Its versatility never ceases to amaze me. Filet crochet can be used for curtains, table runners, accessories, and many kinds of garments. I chose it to feature in my crochet cardigan called Heather’s Basic Blazer.

I like pieces of clothing that are easy to mix and match. Especially cardigans should work with everything in your closet. This basic style works wonders with skirts and dresses, and compliments looks built around trousers. The only thing that can clash with this cardigan is its color. I’ve sorted out that problem by making two: one in basic black, and one in petrol blue. The blue version is actually made with a combination of two yarns. A light, upcycled acrylic in petrol blue, and a satin finished black yarn also upcycled. The combo of two textures and colors gave the blazer a unique finish, and made the blue cardigan decadently heavy. I’ve often heard that one shouldn’t mix different weights and finishes, but I think it’s a way to add detail to a basic garment. As long as the yarns can both be washed in the same temperature, it’s OK to go nuts. I recommend playing around with yarns. After all, crocheting should be fun and rewarding.

The black version is made with basic cotton. I chose to use upcycled materials for both black and blue crochet cardigan. You can find a short tute on how to salvage yarn here, but feel free to use freshly bought yarn or something from your stash instead. This crochet cardigan works with any kind of sport weight yarn. As long as the gauge matches, you’re good to go!

Both these cardigans have quickly become my absolute favourites. They’re easy to pair, comfy to wear, and offer the right amount of warmth to casual outfits. With a sleek shape, they’re even nice to wear under winter coats!

I hope you’ll enjoy the Heather’s Basic Blazer crochet pattern!

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

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