Tag Archives: cardigan

Two Velvet Skirt Looks

On Tuesday, I showed you a long velvet skirt I made based on our Lace Skirt Pattern. In today’s Everyday With an Edge -post, I wanted to share two more outfit ideas with the skirt.

Long skirts aren’t the right choice for a walk through a forest, but they’re wonderfully comfortable in the city. A long hem offers coverage from both the sun and curious eyes, and is an easy way to achieve a polished look. My velvet skirt is the kind of skirt that goes with pretty much anything. Paired with a jersey top, it makes a cute everyday-look. With a bit of lace, it turns into a comfy style for an evening out.

I planned these outfits to be as comfy as possible. They’re both best for a day of shopping, or dinner at home with the family

Velvet Skirt with Lace Cardigan

Crochet lace is one of all-time favourite things. It’s beautiful, bears a vintage vibe, and can make any outfit decadently pretty. For this outfit, I paired the velvet skirt with a basic spaghetti-strap top, an elastic belt, and a crochet cardigan I made just this spring.

 I’ve been binging on Downton Abbey lately, and wanted to create an elegant outfit to incorporate a little bit of the 1920s decadence. During the early 1920s, hems started creeping upward, and waist lines dropped drastically. Materials used in clothing were rich and detailed, especially in evening wear.

This style is very much inspired by Downton Abbey’s wealth. I like the way the cardigan and long skirt create a narrow silhouette, and the way black pearls subtly hint toward the era.

Gypsy Look

Everything off-shoulder was a big thing last summer, and the trend is still going strong. Though off-shoulder styles look lovely, they do come with one or two little issues. They tend to fall off, and when one leans over, they offer a good look at everything.

I planned this outfit to be free of both issues.

I made the off-shoulder top with chiffon sleeves last spring, and am still in the process of turning it into a pattern. For the photos, I wore the top over a basic spaghetti-strap top. I also wore a waist corselet over it. Now if the off-shoulder top slides out of place, I have the spaghetti-strapped one to trust. The corselet serves not only as a pretty detail, but to keep the top securely in place when leaning. With added safety-features, the off-shoulder top can actually be worn outside!

I paired the tops and corselet with my velvet skirt to achieve a modern gypsy-look. The large sleeves remind me of fortune tellers, so I wanted to incorporate some of their style. Instead of the romantic style with flowing hems and scarves, I chose a sleeker style. With less to look at, the outfit draws more attention to subtle details.

I felt really comfortable in this outfit, and almost wore it to my aunt’s birthday party. I decided against this only because the day was sunny and hot, and velvet would have been too warm.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about the velvet skirt looks!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Crochet Dress and Cardigan

A while back, I mentioned a little crochet project I was working on. Cotton and lace is a combo I really like, so one thing led to another. Instead of one lace garment, I now have two!

I found a basic pattern for a lace dress on Novita’s site many, many years ago. I loved it, but didn’t dare try it. After gathering more experience and courage in crocheting, I went back looking for the crochet dress pattern. Novita had taken it down, but I managed to dig up a chart for the lace repeat. I memorized it, tried to make a dress, and failed miserably. This spring, I tried again.

The lace repeat is relatively simple, but still lovely to look at. It’s airy and light, and reminds me of spiderwebs.

I used two hook sizes with the dress, 3mm and 3,5m. Upping the hook size at the hip gave the hem of the dress a bit more room and saved me from adding more stitches. This style is started at the empire line, and worked both up and down from there. The sleeves are worked separately, and the dress has a zipper in the back.

The dress turned out really pretty. I can’t remember how long I’ve wanted to make one, and now that I have, I want another one!

Crochet Dress worked with black cotton

After finishing the crochet dress, I sill had some yarn left. As spring was coming along, I figured I needed more lace. I didn’t have a cute, comfy cardigan to wear out, so I decided to need one.

I cast on another lace project, and before I knew it, I had my cute cardie.

Like the dress, this one is worked both up and down from the empire line. I added a triple crochet row there just in case I wanted to slip a contrast coloured satin ribbon in.

I left the cardie pretty short, and only used a 3mm hook.

I plan to wear this cardigan with dresses only, so I felt comfortable leaving the hem open. The cardigan closes only at the bust, which makes it perfect to wear even with waist corsets. Bright colours push through the lace, and make the cardigan super-cute over red and blue dresses.

The red dress will soon be published as a pattern. I’m planning to add more items to the Pretty Basics, and the figure-hugging dress will be the first in line. I’m also planning to start posting outfit photos on IG, so be sure to follow me there, too!

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my crochet dress and cardigan!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

EDIT: After a bit more searching, I found the pattern! It’s in Finnish only, but there are really clear charts.

Pattern

Charts

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Why I Love to Crochet

Lace is one of my favorite things to wear. It’s feminine and delicate, but often a bit too fancy for everyday clothes.

Crochet garments can be made with all kinds of materials. I like to play with cotton and large hooks. This combo makes lace cardigans and dresses suitable for almost any everyday occasion, from shopping to casual dinners. Using simple lace patterns also serves to enhance the wearability of crochet garments.

Most of the things I crochet are black. Two of my latest crochet projects are a dress and cardigan both made with the same lace. I found the pattern for both on Novita’s website in the year I-forget, must have been 2006ish, but sadly, they’ve since given the site a make-over. That means the patterns can’t be found anywhere. I’ve literally turned the internet upside-down in search of it, but came out empty handed. The lace repeat is lovely, though, and it’s found its place among my favorites. It’s airy, it’s easy, and it totally works for an office-cardie.

I’m hoping to show you the finished items soon!

Crochet lace can look intimidating. For me, it did seem like an impossible thing to master. I was literally afraid of trying for years, but once I did, it dawned on me that most lace is created with basic stitches. Know how to chain, single- and double crochet, and you’re good to go. Even the simplest stitches can make an intricate surface. This is clearly seen with Evan Plevinski’s Elise Shawl. The pattern doesn’t have a difficult stitch in it, and the result is just beautiful.

I’ve made two so far, a red one for Mom, and a purple one for me. Mine turned out really big, though I haven’t gotten around to properly blocking it!

Lace is a versatile texture. It ‘s beautiful and feminine, and easier to create than one imagines. It brings a touch of luxury into everyday life, and that’s the reason why I love crocheting so much.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Wide Sleeved Cardigan

Soft, red yarn turned to rib and simple lace, and the combination made way for a unique cardigan. Our Wide Sleeved Cardigan Knitting Pattern is easy to work, and a relatively quick knit. With interesting details, it’s a delight to work and wear.

wide sleeved cardigan knitting pattern, image four

The model cardigan is made with a self-patterning yarn. This gave the cardigan a unique colorization. The style works with single-toned yarns as well as with self-striping products. With so many yarn options, you’re sure to be able to find your favourite. The cardigan calls for sport weight yarn, which comes in many colours and textures. The model cardigan is made with a wool-polyamide -yarn, but feel free to use cotton or alpaca instead. Whichever yarn you pick, this style will love it. Just make certain the gauge matches!

The wide sleeved cardigan knitting pattern features a low-cut neckline and a large collar. This gives the knit a decadent feel. With flared sleeves and a dropped shoulder line, this cardigan is delightfully different. A cropped hem makes it easy to pair the cardigan with various outfits. It works well with short dresses, and looks fabulous paired with skinny jeans and knee-high boots. Though the cardigan in itself doesn’t bear options for alteration, you can spruce it up by pairing it with a number of versatile outfits and your favourite accessories.

The wide sleeved cardigan is worked in the flat. It combines 2×2 rib and simple lace. The alteration of two basic knit surfaces makes the pattern quick and easy to work with, and creates an interesting look. As an added detail, the sleeves have a narrow picot edge. This means you’re going to need a bit of crochet skills as well! The pattern is easy to work with, and it suits both beginners and those of us who love to knit while binging on our fav TV-shows.

I hope you’ll enjoy our Wide Sleeved Cardigan Knitting Pattern.

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

red cardigan with large collar and bell sleeves, image two

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Heather’s Basic Blazer

Filet crochet is one of my favorite crochet techniques. It’s easy, quick to master, and lovely to look at. Its versatility never ceases to amaze me. Filet crochet can be used for curtains, table runners, accessories, and many kinds of garments. I chose it to feature in my crochet cardigan called Heather’s Basic Blazer.

I like pieces of clothing that are easy to mix and match. Especially cardigans should work with everything in your closet. This basic style works wonders with skirts and dresses, and compliments looks built around trousers. The only thing that can clash with this cardigan is its color. I’ve sorted out that problem by making two: one in basic black, and one in petrol blue. The blue version is actually made with a combination of two yarns. A light, upcycled acrylic in petrol blue, and a satin finished black yarn also upcycled. The combo of two textures and colors gave the blazer a unique finish, and made the blue cardigan decadently heavy. I’ve often heard that one shouldn’t mix different weights and finishes, but I think it’s a way to add detail to a basic garment. As long as the yarns can both be washed in the same temperature, it’s OK to go nuts. I recommend playing around with yarns. After all, crocheting should be fun and rewarding.

The black version is made with basic cotton. I chose to use upcycled materials for both black and blue crochet cardigan. You can find a short tute on how to salvage yarn here, but feel free to use freshly bought yarn or something from your stash instead. This crochet cardigan works with any kind of sport weight yarn. As long as the gauge matches, you’re good to go!

Both these cardigans have quickly become my absolute favourites. They’re easy to pair, comfy to wear, and offer the right amount of warmth to casual outfits. With a sleek shape, they’re even nice to wear under winter coats!

I hope you’ll enjoy the Heather’s Basic Blazer crochet pattern!

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

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