Purlace

Purlace, our new gloves knitting pattern, was launched on Friday. Today, I wanted to share a bit more info about these intricate gloves. I love this pattern, and I hope you will, too!

Purlace and its sister-pattern Lovelace are this week’s featured products with Lune. I’m thinking about doing another outfit post on Friday, but today we’ll concentrate on Purlace.

I wear knit gloves, and knit gloves alone during the winter. Layers of wool keep my hands warm better than leather, and often hand-knit gloves are more unique than store-bought ones. I wanted Purlace to be beautiful but still comfortable. That’s why I chose to work them with reverse stockinette and lace. I wanted to make the outside lovely to look at, and the inside smooth against the hand. Reverse stockinette gave me just that: Purlace are super-pretty, and still soft to wear. They’ll be even softer if you use a yarn with a smooth finish. I worked the model gloves with Novita’s Nalle, and was rewarded with a nice and painful yarnburn on my finger. I would advice against using that! Leafing through amazon, I found an acrylic yarn that might be pretty perfect for this pattern. This Red Heart yarn is a bit lighter from Nalle, but the gauge is pretty close. If you purchase the yarn through the link below, I might earn a little extra.
Coats Yarn Red Heart Comfort Sport Yarn

Purlace have a lot of details. They’re embellished with cables and lace columns, and have a hidden thumb gusset.

I chose coin cables for these gloves. Both the wrist and the back of the glove bear a similar pattern. The cables on the wrist end to leave the palm smooth, but the ones on the back of the hand continue to reach the fingers.

Lace columns climb all the way to the tops of the forefinger and pinkie on both sides.

These gloves have a lot going on. That’s why I recommend using solid colors for Purlace. Self-striping yarns are beautiful, but they tend to make intricate styles a bit busy. With cables and lace, one color is better than many.

Purlace look challenging to work, and they do require a bit of knitting skills. I wouldn’t call this an overwhelming project, though. Purlace is an intermediate pattern, tops! Lace and cables aren’t that difficult if you know the basics, but the pattern requires you to know how to read charts.

I hope you’ll love our Purlace Gloves Knitting Pattern as much as I do!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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