Lee’s Dress

Last weekend, I went to London to see Garbage play at Brixton Academy. The trip exhausted me a bit, so instead of pushing out a proper blog post for Tuesday, I updated this one in order to make it appear a bit more like a proper tutorial. Now I don’t know how well I did, but I do hope it’ll offer aid in transforming dresses. And speaking of dresses, I made a new one for London. It’s inspired by traditional Japanese fashion, made with faux silk (or real one if you so choose), and launched today! Here’s Lee’s Dress, a kimono dress that’s ridiculously easy to sew!

I found the fabric for Lee’s Dress around Christmas. It refused to tell me what it wanted to be when it grew up, so I planned to sew it into a wrap skirt, a wrap dress, a sleeveless dress with a waterfall neckline, a circle top, and even loose pants. The fabric refused all my ideas, and then, all of a sudden, it announced its desire to become a kimono dress. I said good heavens, that certainly took you long enough, and set to work.

The idea of creating a kimono-inspired dress has been bugging me for a while now. I love the shape of a kimono-collar and the loose, square sleeves but using those elements in a modern design was a bit scary. Luckily, a quick trip around the internet proved that kimono-inspired dresses have been around for quite a while without really offending anyone. Lee’s Dress was born pretty quickly after that. I wanted the dress to have a perfect fit, and spent two days measuring and re-measuring and over-thinking it. Finally, I’d gathered up enough courage to cut the dress and to sew it. And lo and behold, it turned out perfect! The only thing I altered was adding darts the back of the bodice. Other than that, everything fit exactly as planned, and I wore Lee’s Dress out to dinner on Friday night.

In London.

Lee’s Dress is designed with a kimono collar, and empire waist, an A-lined hem sewn with panels, and a short zipper in the center back seam. Long, loose sleeves can be gathered with ribbons, and worn either short or long. This dress is best made with non-elastic materials, but the more I think about it, the more I believe that a slightly stretchy fabric would work, too. An elastic satin, for example, would be a good choice for Lee’s Dress. Jerseys, on the other hand, are too floppy for this dress. Choosing a high quality non-elastic material will make Lee’s Dress look classy and smart and, let’s face it, more expensive.

Lee’s Dress will be on sale for all VIPs through next week, so if you haven’t already, now’s a good time to join our mailing list to gain access to all sorts of special offers.

I hope you’ll enjoy our brand new kimono dress sewing pattern!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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