Lee’s Dress

Last weekend, I went to London to see Garbage play at Brixton Academy. The trip exhausted me a bit, so instead of pushing out a proper blog post for Tuesday, I updated this one in order to make it appear a bit more like a proper tutorial. Now I don’t know how well I did, but I do hope it’ll offer aid in transforming dresses. And speaking of dresses, I made a new one for London. It’s inspired by traditional Japanese fashion, made with faux silk (or real one if you so choose), and launched today! Here’s Lee’s Dress, a kimono dress that’s ridiculously easy to sew!

I found the fabric for Lee’s Dress around Christmas. It refused to tell me what it wanted to be when it grew up, so I planned to sew it into a wrap skirt, a wrap dress, a sleeveless dress with a waterfall neckline, a circle top, and even loose pants. The fabric refused all my ideas, and then, all of a sudden, it announced its desire to become a kimono dress. I said good heavens, that certainly took you long enough, and set to work.

The idea of creating a kimono-inspired dress has been bugging me for a while now. I love the shape of a kimono-collar and the loose, square sleeves but using those elements in a modern design was a bit scary. Luckily, a quick trip around the internet proved that kimono-inspired dresses have been around for quite a while without really offending anyone. Lee’s Dress was born pretty quickly after that. I wanted the dress to have a perfect fit, and spent two days measuring and re-measuring and over-thinking it. Finally, I’d gathered up enough courage to cut the dress and to sew it. And lo and behold, it turned out perfect! The only thing I altered was adding darts the back of the bodice. Other than that, everything fit exactly as planned, and I wore Lee’s Dress out to dinner on Friday night.

In London.

Lee’s Dress is designed with a kimono collar, and empire waist, an A-lined hem sewn with panels, and a short zipper in the center back seam. Long, loose sleeves can be gathered with ribbons, and worn either short or long. This dress is best made with non-elastic materials, but the more I think about it, the more I believe that a slightly stretchy fabric would work, too. An elastic satin, for example, would be a good choice for Lee’s Dress. Jerseys, on the other hand, are too floppy for this dress. Choosing a high quality non-elastic material will make Lee’s Dress look classy and smart and, let’s face it, more expensive.

Lee’s Dress will be on sale for all VIPs through next week, so if you haven’t already, now’s a good time to join our mailing list to gain access to all sorts of special offers.

I hope you’ll enjoy our brand new kimono dress sewing pattern!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Daisy’s Dress

On Tuesday, I showed you a Pretty Basic Jersey Dress I made from a printed, elastic velvet. Today, we’ll continue with the same fabric. Originally, I got it for a pattern I wanted to make. Tuesday’s dress was a by-product, and today, I’m happy to announce the launch of Daisy’s Dress, an empire-lined velvet dress fit for informal parties!

Daisy’s Dress is easy to sew. It’s actually border lining a Pretty Basic! Since it is designed for challenging materials, I decided it deserved a place among the more difficult styles. Daisy’s Dress is made with two fabrics, one of them being printed velvet. There are many things you have to take into consideration when working with prints, and velvet raises the bar even higher. Elasticity adds yet another bar to the difficulty, so though the pattern itself is quite simple, this dress can prove tricky to make.

Daisy’s Dress features a high waist line, a shaped hem, and short sleeves. These design elements make the dress feminine and flattering. I wanted to make this velvet dress as easy to wear and accessorize as possible. Making this can prove challenging, so wearing it should definitely not be that!

This dress comes with an option to sew a double-bound neckline, and a puff-ball hem. You can also use a variety of materials for this design. Try using a solid velvet, or even a thick, elastic satin. Choosing to sew the dress in two layers gives you an option to use a light satin lining and elastic lace. And if the need to install a zipper arises, pop it into the side seam.

Daisy’s Dress Sewing Pattern is our featured product for this week and next, which means that it’s on sale for all VIPs. To gain access to this offer and others like it, just order our newsletter. We send out a weekly note with a recap of past week’s blog posts, and a discount code for featured products.

I hope you’ll have fun sewing up Daisy’s Dresses! Next week, I’ll show you a few looks created with this velvet dress.

Until then.

Love,

Heather

Jane’s Dress

On Friday, I published a brand new sewing pattern called Mary’s Dress. Today, I’m happy to introduce its sister, Jane’s Dress!

These two patterns both feature an empire waist paired with fitted hem, but where Mary’s Dress is simple and elegant, Jane’s Dress is just plain fun. I made mine with crushed velvet, but any kind of elastic material is fine for this one. Jane’s Dress might even enjoy a crazy print!

Many of our patterns come with hoods. I don’t really care for wearing hoods, but I like the option. With Jane’s Dress I finally did what I’ve been wanting to do for a long time: create a detachable hood. Jane’s Dress can be eerie and mysterious with a hood…

… and fun and cute without it!

Jane’s Dress features fun, playful elements. It has short puff sleeves, an empire waist, and a ruffled hem. Where Mary’s Dress likes to be worn as is, Jane’s Dress loves accessories. This has literally become my go-to dress, and I’d like to wear it every time we go out! And even though I’m not much of a hood-girl, I might be brave enough to wear it, too, someday.

The hood, as mentioned, pops right off for the days you don’t feel like wearing it. It can be made lined or unlined, and using a contrast colored material for lining gives it a unique look. I lined the hood with red satin I had lying around from a custom order I made in a previous life. Satin is actually a really good choice for lining. It’s smooth and soft against the skin, looks beautiful, and makes your hair really static gives the hood a bit more structure. Crushed velvet on its own is soft and drapey. Paired with satin, it becomes stiffer and better behaved.

Mary’s and Jane’s (no, I have no idea who they are) Dresses are both on sale for VIPs. At first I thought I’d only do two weeks, but I have now changed my mind. These two will be featured in our blog, and on sale, until May 14th!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

PS. If you’re a VIP, you can use last Friday’s code to get both Mary’s and Jane’s Dresses at a lowered price.

Mary’s Dress

Today, I’m happy to launch a brand new sewing pattern! This is called Mary’s Dress. It’s simple, elegant, and features ruffled cuffs and a laced up bodice. What makes this dress special is that I got married in it only three weeks ago.

Mary’s Dress is best made with elastic fabrics. I used a soft, smooth poly-blend for mine, but any kind of stretchy fabric will do. Viscose and cotton jerseys are perfect for this. Crushed velvet will also work, giving the dress a lovely, lively look. Since Mary’s Dress does come with a laced up bodice, I recommend making it with fabrics without a print. Too many details can make a dress look busy, and this one is an easy target.

Mary’s Dress comes with ruffled cuffs. I wanted a dress that’s simple and easy to wear as is, but still has some level of feminine detail. Cuffs were the first thing I wanted to embellish. Hands are important to me, naturally, and I like to wear pretty things on them. Ruffles are my weakness: if I could, I’d wear them everyday. Unfortunately, ruffles do get in the way when writing and sewing. With this dress, though, I decided to go nuts. After all, I made this for my wedding day.

The ruffles are made with two separate layers. They’re attached to the sleeve with a cuff, and pleated for a feminine feel.

I love the ruffles, and I’m actually leafing through my dresses, looking for one I could add ruffled cuffs to… The sleeves on Mary’s Dress come long so that the ruffles sit over the hand, not just around the wrist.

I wanted something more to the dress, something that would take it to the next level. A long, long time ago, I made a dress with a lace up bodice, and I literally wore it to shreds. I decided the detail would be perfect for Mary’s Dress, and went ahead with the idea. Mary’s Dress features a laced up front that gives the dress another feminine detail.

The pattern is freshly launched, and on sale for all VIPs. And on Tuesday, I’m going to publish this pattern’s sister, Jane’s Dress, which will also go on sale for VIPs!

Until then.

Love,

Heather

Bishop Wrap

Wrap dresses are lovely and elegant. They flatter all body types, and can be styled up for nearly any occasion. The belts, though, can be a bit annoying at times. A cute bow is pretty to look at, and loose belts create an interesting detail, but they make styling a wrap dress all the more difficult. I wanted a wrap dress that would have an open hem, a revealing neckline, and no belts or buttons. I also wanted to incorporate my favorite sleeve style to the design. Thus was born our brand new wrap dress sewing pattern, The Bishop Wrap.

The Bishop Wrap has a long hem that’s open on both sides up to the hip. It comes with a daring neckline that can be made with or without a gathered detail. This dress is best made with elastic materials such as light viscose or cotton jersey. I made mine in black, but this style loves wild prints and bright colors. 

A viscose jersey similar to the one I used is available on amazon. I also picked out a beautiful green snake print viscose jersey. If you purchase materials through the links below, I might make a little extra.
Black Viscose Spandex Fabric, Causal Jersey Knit Fabric, Fabric by the Yard – 1 YARD
Snakeskin Print Viscose Stretch Jersey Knit Dress Fabric Green – per metre

The Bishop Wrap has long, wide sleeves that are gathered at the wrist with a tight cuff. I personally love this sleeve style. It’s feminine and comfortable, and bears a vintage feel. The bishop sleeve was hugely popular in the sixties, and I actually have a few vintage patterns that rock this style.

This wrap dress pattern comes with a full length hem. I highly recommend using a light fabric for this dress. The hem takes a lot of fabric, and a heavy material can make it stretch and pull in wear. A light material makes the dress comfortable to wear.

The Bishop Wrap loves belts and corsets. It can be paired with all kinds of waist enhancing accessories. This dress also likes the company of cardigans and shrugs. Next week, I’ll show you how to rock this wrap dress in two different Everyday With an Edge -posts!

As you may have guessed, The Bishop Wrap Dress Pattern is our featured product for the coming week. It will be on sale for all VIPs, so now’s a good time to join our mailing list to gain access to the special offer.

I hope you’ll enjoy The Bishop Wrap! I’ll see you on Tuesday!

Love,

Heather

Pretty Basic Party Dress

In the previous post, I showed you the dress I wore on my Birthday. It’s based on our sewing pattern called The Pretty Basic Party Dress. Today, I get to share the first post featuring this dress!

I originally made The Pretty Basic Party Dress during the winter. Publishing it took a bit longer than usual due to a surprising amount of technical difficulties. I’m happy to say that it seems like I won’t have to spend so much time with technical details with our site, and can start focusing on creating patterns again. There are a few coming soon, but I’ll tell you more about them later.

Today, we’re focusing on the new dress.

The Pretty Basic Party Dress continues the line of Pretty Basics. These styles are designed to be easy to sew and comfy to wear. They can also be mixed and matched. The Pretty Basic Party Dress is the latest addition. It goes with The Pretty Basic Cardigan and The Garter Petticoat. I’m currently working on a Pretty Basic Vortex Shawl, and that will also pair up nicely with this dress.

The Pretty Basic Party Dress is made with viscose jersey and mesh. The dress has a seamless yoke and flared sleeves. The yoke and lower sleeves are designed to be made with see-through material. You can naturally choose any kind of fabric for the dress: no part of it needs to be translucent if you don’t like that.

The Pretty Basic Party Dress has an A-lined hem. The dress is fitted at the waist, and widens toward the hem. The model dresses are both quite short, but you can easily lengthen the hem if you so choose.

The dress is designed to be super-easy to make. It’s best made with elastic fabrics, but the techniques used are beginner-friendly. I’d say that the most challenging part is binding the neckline.

I’ve made three versions of the dress now, and will probably make more. The style is really cute, and the dress is unbelievable comfortable. I made the second version with lighter viscose jersey and elastic lace. I made the sleeves in elbow-length simply by leaving out the lower sleeve and lengthening the pattern a bit. I bound the cuffs with strips of fabric to match the neckline.

These dresses are best made with viscose jersey and elastic lace fabric.

The Pretty Basic Party dress is our featured product until October 16th. It will be on sale, but only for VIPs. If you wish to gain access to the offer, hurry up and sign up to our mailing list. Newsletters go out on Fridays at around 7:00PM GMT+3!

I hope you’ll enjoy The Pretty Basic Party Dress.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Pretty Basic Jersey Dress

On Tuesday, I showed you some crochet projects I made just for the fun of it. Both the crochet dress and cardigan were paired with a red dress. Today, I wanted to share more info on the freshly published Pretty Basic Jersey Dress Sewing Pattern.

I like things that are easy to mix and match. Since dresses are my favourite thing to wear, I wanted to create a dress that goes with everything.

The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress is just that. It works with all kinds of cardigans and shrugs, can be paired with a belt of a corset, likes to hide under longer circle skirts and pose as a top, can even be made in mini-length and worn with leggings. With this dress, anything goes. And what’s best of all, it doesn’t really need to be accessorized. The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress is the kind of garment you can just pull on when you’re late for work, and still feel cute all day.

This style is designed to be made with viscose or cotton jersey. I chose solid colours for my two dresses. Black and red are the colours I wear most often, but this style works with other tones, too. Try a light beige to wear under lace garments. This will create a striking nude-look. Create the dress with a wild print for a fashion statement, or pick a light pastel to celebrate summer days in. Whatever your choice, this dress will love it.

The pattern is available in five sizes, from petite 32 to 40. It’s designed to be figure-hugging in a comfy way. The pattern comes with two neckline choices, and you can easily modify the hem and sleeves in length.

I hope you’ll enjoy The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress Sewing Pattern!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

PS. This dress, being freshly launched, will be the VIP special offer for two weeks in a row! If you haven’t already, be sure to join our mailing list to gain access for VIP-coupon codes.

SkaterDress

On Tuesday, I showed you a cute little dress I made in less than two hours. I based it loosely on our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern, and today, I’d like to write more about the pattern.

The skater dress and its variations are among the most popular dress styles. With a fitted bodice and a flared hem, what’s not to love! The basic skater dress pattern can be modded beyond belief. With our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern, I did just that. Along with the basic style, our skater dress sewing pattern includes a hooded, Gothic-inspired style, and a variation based on a store-bought blouse. I for one like to sew a pattern over and over again if the style pleases me. Adding details and little mods can change up a basic pattern quite a bit. This pattern is designed with the re-sewing option in mind.

The example of our basic style is made with long sleeves, and a smooth hem and bodice. I used viscose jersey for this style, and I really like that choice. A soft fabric makes the dress comfy for everyday wear.

The basic style is super-easy to accessorize. It goes with pretty much anything! Try adding a belt to the mix, wear the dress over a top, or pop a cardigan over it. You can change it up when sewing, too: make the hem longer or shorter, mix jersey with elastic lace, or pick a patterned material. The basic style really loves its variations, so don’t hesitate to go wild with it!

The basic skater dress bends to all sorts of ways. When making this pattern, I wanted to see just how much can be done with it. For the Gothic version of the pattern, I added bell sleeves, a laced up bodice, and a large hood. All of these elements together make the dress a Gothic girls dream. This style can also be taken apart for a more subdued look. Try sewing a basic dress with a hood, or adding the lacing to the basic style. Change the fabric from velvet to jersey, and the dress changes altogether!

This style is a bit more challenging to accessorize due to the amount of detail. The dress likes jewelry and petticoats, and of course cute leg-wear paired with wicked boots.

The last style is my personal favorite. It’s made taking advantage of upcycled materials. For it, you’ll need a fitted blouse, and a hem’s worth of fabric. The model dress has a three-layer hem: tulle, and two kinds of fabric. The top layer is cut into an asymmetric shape to give the voluminous hem a bit more drama.

This style can be paired with corsets and ties which give the dress an androgynous vibe.

The pattern includes a hem, two options for bodice, sleeves that can be made long or short or topped with a circular cuff, and a hood. All of these parts fit together, so you can just take your pick of the elements you’d like to use, and make your dream come true. I’m currently dreaming of a full-length skater dress…

I hope you’ll enjoy The Skater Dress Sewing Pattern!

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

Our Favorite Hooded Patterns

Hooded sewing patterns come in many shapes and styles. My favorites are big ones, the kind you can really hide under. Three of our patterns include the large hood- feature.

One of our first sewing patterns was The Hooded Shrug. It’s made with thick jersey, and trimmed with lace. It has a flattering shape that’s easy to mix and match, and long sleeves with a trumpet shape. The shrug is closed with one button at the neck, and the large hood brings a touch of fairytale to the design. The Hooded Shrug is one of my all-time favorite designs, and I’m thinking of making a new one for the summer.

lace trimmed shrug with large hood, image one

Jersey is my absolute favorite material to both work with and wear. It’s easy to handle once you master it, comfy to wear, and very forgiving when worked with. I used super-light, almost see-through viscose jersey for our Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern. The dress has a wide hem and reverse puff sleeves along with a large hood. The dress is made with two layers of light jersey, which makes it warm during the winter.

You can mod the pattern by sewing the dress with one layer only, and even make the dress hoodless. Personally, though, I think that the hood kinda makes the dress.

The latest of our hooded designs is an asymmetrical wrap top. It’s made with light jersey, and has a layer of mesh under the wrap-cut front pieces. The top has a large hood made with two layers of fabric. This gives the hood a tidy inside so you can easily wear it down.

I adore this design, and I’m happy that it’s gotten a lot of positive feedback!

 

If you haven’t yet joined our mailing list, now’s a good time to do so. You’ll receive a 20% discount code as a welcome present, plus exclusive offers on select products. This weekend, these three hooded designs are on sale for all our VIPs!

I hope you’ll enjoy our Hooded Designs.

Until next time!

Love,

Heather

Hitched Hems

Dresses are my favorite things to wear. They’re easy to mix and match, and never out of place. Styles to choose from are endless, and materials used vary from cotton to velvet to leather. Personally, I like dresses that are both versatile and classic. One of my favorite designs in our collection is The Princess and Keyhole Dress. It features puff-sleeves, a keyhole neck, and hitched hems.

princess-seamed dress, one

The Princess and Keyhole Dress is best made with non-elastic materials such as cotton. The dress has princess seams, so it’s shaped at the bodice, and a wide hem. Puff-sleeves make it comfy to wear, but the key element is the hem.

The dress is made with channels on the hem’s seams. With ribbons slid into the channels, the hem can be modified in both length and shape. The dress can be worn long, pulled up at the front, or gathered into a short version. I like to use the ribbons to shorten the hem at the front to show off a colorful peticoat.

The shape of the dress finds its origin in the Victorian era, when hems were wide, ruffled, and often gathered. I’ve used the element of hitched hems in an earlier design as well.

princess-seamed dress, four

The Victorian Skirt is made with two layers. The botton layer features a wide ruffle, and the upper layer can be hitched up with ribbons. The Victorian Skirt is made with a very simple pattern, so it’s available as a drafting tutorial only. This allows everyone to create a skirt with their own, unique measurements.
Hitched hems are an easy way to create a versatile dress. The Victorian Skirt can be worn with both layers smooth and long, pulled up evenly, gathered at the front, or even arranged into a bustle-like shape. I like to wear mine gathered evenly, and I’ve even made a version with ribbon channels on both layers of the skirt.

black satin skirt, Victorian style

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about our Hitched Hems -sewing patterns.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather