Lee’s Dress

Last weekend, I went to London to see Garbage play at Brixton Academy. The trip exhausted me a bit, so instead of pushing out a proper blog post for Tuesday, I updated this one in order to make it appear a bit more like a proper tutorial. Now I don’t know how well I did, but I do hope it’ll offer aid in transforming dresses. And speaking of dresses, I made a new one for London. It’s inspired by traditional Japanese fashion, made with faux silk (or real one if you so choose), and launched today! Here’s Lee’s Dress, a kimono dress that’s ridiculously easy to sew!

I found the fabric for Lee’s Dress around Christmas. It refused to tell me what it wanted to be when it grew up, so I planned to sew it into a wrap skirt, a wrap dress, a sleeveless dress with a waterfall neckline, a circle top, and even loose pants. The fabric refused all my ideas, and then, all of a sudden, it announced its desire to become a kimono dress. I said good heavens, that certainly took you long enough, and set to work.

The idea of creating a kimono-inspired dress has been bugging me for a while now. I love the shape of a kimono-collar and the loose, square sleeves but using those elements in a modern design was a bit scary. Luckily, a quick trip around the internet proved that kimono-inspired dresses have been around for quite a while without really offending anyone. Lee’s Dress was born pretty quickly after that. I wanted the dress to have a perfect fit, and spent two days measuring and re-measuring and over-thinking it. Finally, I’d gathered up enough courage to cut the dress and to sew it. And lo and behold, it turned out perfect! The only thing I altered was adding darts the back of the bodice. Other than that, everything fit exactly as planned, and I wore Lee’s Dress out to dinner on Friday night.

In London.

Lee’s Dress is designed with a kimono collar, and empire waist, an A-lined hem sewn with panels, and a short zipper in the center back seam. Long, loose sleeves can be gathered with ribbons, and worn either short or long. This dress is best made with non-elastic materials, but the more I think about it, the more I believe that a slightly stretchy fabric would work, too. An elastic satin, for example, would be a good choice for Lee’s Dress. Jerseys, on the other hand, are too floppy for this dress. Choosing a high quality non-elastic material will make Lee’s Dress look classy and smart and, let’s face it, more expensive.

Lee’s Dress will be on sale for all VIPs through next week, so if you haven’t already, now’s a good time to join our mailing list to gain access to all sorts of special offers.

I hope you’ll enjoy our brand new kimono dress sewing pattern!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Daisy’s Dress

On Tuesday, I showed you a Pretty Basic Jersey Dress I made from a printed, elastic velvet. Today, we’ll continue with the same fabric. Originally, I got it for a pattern I wanted to make. Tuesday’s dress was a by-product, and today, I’m happy to announce the launch of Daisy’s Dress, an empire-lined velvet dress fit for informal parties!

Daisy’s Dress is easy to sew. It’s actually border lining a Pretty Basic! Since it is designed for challenging materials, I decided it deserved a place among the more difficult styles. Daisy’s Dress is made with two fabrics, one of them being printed velvet. There are many things you have to take into consideration when working with prints, and velvet raises the bar even higher. Elasticity adds yet another bar to the difficulty, so though the pattern itself is quite simple, this dress can prove tricky to make.

Daisy’s Dress features a high waist line, a shaped hem, and short sleeves. These design elements make the dress feminine and flattering. I wanted to make this velvet dress as easy to wear and accessorize as possible. Making this can prove challenging, so wearing it should definitely not be that!

This dress comes with an option to sew a double-bound neckline, and a puff-ball hem. You can also use a variety of materials for this design. Try using a solid velvet, or even a thick, elastic satin. Choosing to sew the dress in two layers gives you an option to use a light satin lining and elastic lace. And if the need to install a zipper arises, pop it into the side seam.

Daisy’s Dress Sewing Pattern is our featured product for this week and next, which means that it’s on sale for all VIPs. To gain access to this offer and others like it, just order our newsletter. We send out a weekly note with a recap of past week’s blog posts, and a discount code for featured products.

I hope you’ll have fun sewing up Daisy’s Dresses! Next week, I’ll show you a few looks created with this velvet dress.

Until then.

Love,

Heather

Jane’s Dress

On Friday, I published a brand new sewing pattern called Mary’s Dress. Today, I’m happy to introduce its sister, Jane’s Dress!

These two patterns both feature an empire waist paired with fitted hem, but where Mary’s Dress is simple and elegant, Jane’s Dress is just plain fun. I made mine with crushed velvet, but any kind of elastic material is fine for this one. Jane’s Dress might even enjoy a crazy print!

Many of our patterns come with hoods. I don’t really care for wearing hoods, but I like the option. With Jane’s Dress I finally did what I’ve been wanting to do for a long time: create a detachable hood. Jane’s Dress can be eerie and mysterious with a hood…

… and fun and cute without it!

Jane’s Dress features fun, playful elements. It has short puff sleeves, an empire waist, and a ruffled hem. Where Mary’s Dress likes to be worn as is, Jane’s Dress loves accessories. This has literally become my go-to dress, and I’d like to wear it every time we go out! And even though I’m not much of a hood-girl, I might be brave enough to wear it, too, someday.

The hood, as mentioned, pops right off for the days you don’t feel like wearing it. It can be made lined or unlined, and using a contrast colored material for lining gives it a unique look. I lined the hood with red satin I had lying around from a custom order I made in a previous life. Satin is actually a really good choice for lining. It’s smooth and soft against the skin, looks beautiful, and makes your hair really static gives the hood a bit more structure. Crushed velvet on its own is soft and drapey. Paired with satin, it becomes stiffer and better behaved.

Mary’s and Jane’s (no, I have no idea who they are) Dresses are both on sale for VIPs. At first I thought I’d only do two weeks, but I have now changed my mind. These two will be featured in our blog, and on sale, until May 14th!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

PS. If you’re a VIP, you can use last Friday’s code to get both Mary’s and Jane’s Dresses at a lowered price.

Mary’s Dress

Today, I’m happy to launch a brand new sewing pattern! This is called Mary’s Dress. It’s simple, elegant, and features ruffled cuffs and a laced up bodice. What makes this dress special is that I got married in it only three weeks ago.

Mary’s Dress is best made with elastic fabrics. I used a soft, smooth poly-blend for mine, but any kind of stretchy fabric will do. Viscose and cotton jerseys are perfect for this. Crushed velvet will also work, giving the dress a lovely, lively look. Since Mary’s Dress does come with a laced up bodice, I recommend making it with fabrics without a print. Too many details can make a dress look busy, and this one is an easy target.

Mary’s Dress comes with ruffled cuffs. I wanted a dress that’s simple and easy to wear as is, but still has some level of feminine detail. Cuffs were the first thing I wanted to embellish. Hands are important to me, naturally, and I like to wear pretty things on them. Ruffles are my weakness: if I could, I’d wear them everyday. Unfortunately, ruffles do get in the way when writing and sewing. With this dress, though, I decided to go nuts. After all, I made this for my wedding day.

The ruffles are made with two separate layers. They’re attached to the sleeve with a cuff, and pleated for a feminine feel.

I love the ruffles, and I’m actually leafing through my dresses, looking for one I could add ruffled cuffs to… The sleeves on Mary’s Dress come long so that the ruffles sit over the hand, not just around the wrist.

I wanted something more to the dress, something that would take it to the next level. A long, long time ago, I made a dress with a lace up bodice, and I literally wore it to shreds. I decided the detail would be perfect for Mary’s Dress, and went ahead with the idea. Mary’s Dress features a laced up front that gives the dress another feminine detail.

The pattern is freshly launched, and on sale for all VIPs. And on Tuesday, I’m going to publish this pattern’s sister, Jane’s Dress, which will also go on sale for VIPs!

Until then.

Love,

Heather

Pretty Basic Ruffle Skirt

Basics are the foundation of any wardrobe. Our Pretty Basic Collection is just about complete. I will create one more knit item for it, but sewing-wise, we’re done. Today, we’re launching the last sewn item to the line! The Pretty Basic Ruffle Skirt comes in five sizes, and is so quick and easy to sew you won’t believe it. Making the model skirt took me around two hours! That includes all the breaks I took to consider how I’d like to write a tutorial for it.

Our Pretty Basic Ruffle Skirt is best made with medium-weight jersey. I used a viscose jersey in a really nice shade of purple. I was tempted to make this in black, but maybe a wild color will be fun for a change!

Pretty Basic Ruffle Skirt - I made this with medium weight viscose jersey

The Pretty Basic Ruffle Skirt is figure-hugging and short-ish. It features an elastic waist, and ruffled hem. This skirt is made with the simplest techniques, so it’s a cool project for beginners, too! Sewing this skirt is really super-easy, and you’ll only need a serger to make one.

I really like the shape of this skirt. It’s cute, feminine, and really comfortable. The Ruffle Skirt loves most kinds of tops, and works as a petticoat just as well as an outer layer. Since this skirt is made with a material that can turn translucent when worn, I do recommend petticoats or thicker leggings with this one. Layering The Ruffle Skirt up makes it warmer, and even fit for winter wear. Our Garter Petticoat will work wonderfully with this one, just like all the Pretty Basic tops! For extra-warmth, add a Crochet Blazer or a Chunky Shrug to the mix!

I hope you’ll have fun with The Ruffle Skirt. On Friday, I’m going to show you a few outfits made with it!

Until then.

Love,

Heather

Yoked Blouse

The new year has begun, and it’s high time to get back in line. Our first featured product for 2018 is The Yoked Blouse. I just realized that for some reason, I’ve been very quiet about it. It’s one of my wardrobe staples, and I wear it all the time, so I can’t understand why! I love this blouse, and would actually like another one, only with bishop sleeves.

The Yoked Blouse is best made with two kinds of fabric. A light cotton blend for the bodice and lower sleeves, and a slightly elastic chiffon for the yoke and upper sleeves. Mixing elastic and non-elastic materials is a big no-no for some sewists, but I say go nuts. Adding a bit of stretch to a garment makes it much more comfortable, and gives it more ease. Mixing stiff cotton with light jersey won’t work, of course, but lighter cotton blends paired with chiffon with a minuscule amount of elastane is a match made in heaven.

The Yoked Blouse has super-long sleeves. They’re cut flared, and finished with a satin ribbon. This tiny detail makes the sleeves both cute and unique.

The Yoked Blouse comes, obviously, with a yoke. I wanted to create a blouse that’s both conservative and revealing. I accomplished this by using a see-through material for the yoke, while keeping the overall design simple. This style has a low mandarin collar, and a lace detail outlining the yoke.

yoked blouse sewing pattern - collar detail

While this is my favorite blouse, it’s been featured in only two outfit posts. That’s going to change next week! In the mean time, I wanted to re-share the outfits already created with it.

A cute, feminine blouse can be styled in many ways. For this look, I chose a super-wide cotton skirt with a high elastic waist. Looking at these two garments next to each other I was certain they wouldn’t look good together, but lo and behold, they rock! It’s always fun to see unexpected companions turn into a kick-ass outfit, and that totally happened here. The wide, light skirt with asymmetric hem goes beautifully with the blouse, and the belt I tied into a little bow brings the cutest element to the look.

This style was a part of warmer party looks. The Faerie Dragon Shawlette adds loads of color to the look, and makes it warm for winter.

The second look belongs to the “and this is how I wear it” -category. Most of the looks I share in the Everyday With an Edge -part of the blog aren’t exactly Me. This is, for me, an eternal dress up -game that as many as possible can enjoy and draw inspiration from. All black and all Goth would leave me with a very limited audience, so I try to tone most of the looks down a bit, or add a dab of color. This is one of the rare looks I actually wear. I love the way The Yoked Blouse plays with our Victorian Skirt and Reversible Corset, and run to this outfit on days when no dress feels just right. This style is always there to save me!

This Victorian inspired outfit features our rarely seen Yoked Blouse.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about our Yoked Blouse!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Unisex Wrap Skirt

Long, A-lined skirts work for both him and her. Our unisex Wrap Skirt Sewing Pattern is a perfect example of the styles that can go both ways. And that’s not all: sewn fully lined, this skirt can be reversed for a different look.

black cotton unisex wrap skirt

This sewing pattern comes in sizes 32 – 42. The tutorial included comes with a drafting tutorial just in case you need a larger or smaller size. When making a skirt for him, make sure to double-check the length!

Our wrap skirt is best made with non-elastic fabrics, such as cotton. For an everyday look, cotton lined with anything slippery works best. For the model skirt, I chose black cotton and a beige lining silk in order to add a bit of colour to the dark style. Feel free to use patterned fabrics and delisciously colourful lining materials for a fun, unique look!

When making a reversible skirt, make sure to pick fabrics that have a smooth finish. I recommend two layers of satin or taffeta for a reversible skirt. Materials with a rough surface, such as cotton, tend to stick to tights. To make the skirt as comfortable as possible, steer clear of anything clingy when creating a reversible look!

Choosing different materials alters the appearance of this style drastically. Cotton and twill make a stiffer skirt, satin and taffeta fall softer. For a light summer skirt, you can make the skirt without lining, and use viscose jersey. You can even use leather for this style, be it real or faux. I dug up a few fabrics on Amazon which I like. All of these materials are a bit narrower than the cotton I used, so if you do go for these, remember to calculate how much you’ll need! Also, if you order through these link, I might earn a little extra.

First is the Skull and Roses fabric by Timeless Treasures. I love-love-love this print and it would look fabulous paired with red lining!
Timeless Treasures Skulls & Roses Black Fabric By The Yard

The second one I fell for is Under a Spell by Wilmington Prints. The tan tones make this witchy fabric just perfect.
Under a Spell Large Allover Tan Fabric By The Yard

The last one is a skull print cotton sold by Minerva Crafts in the UK. I’ve been eyeing this fabric on eBay for a while now, and though it would work wonderfully for our wrap skirt, I might sew it into a dress instead. if I were to order some as a Christmas prez for myself.
Gothic Skulls Print Cotton Poplin Fabric White on Black – per metre

Adding embellishments, such as pockets and D-ring details, adds attitude to this basic wrap skirt. Use your imagination, and play with the pattern to make the finished garment totally yours. Fashion is all about having fun, and this pattern offers the change for just that.

I hope you’ll enjoy our unisex Wrap Skirt Sewing Pattern!

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

black cotton wrap skirt with beige lining

Bondage-Inspired Mermaid Skirt

Mermaid skirts are easily associated to formal parties. The figure-flattering shape can work as a part of an everyday wardrobe as well. Our Mermaid Skirt Sewing Pattern is designed to be just that: a comfortable, stunning piece that works wonders on a weekday.

The Mermaid Skirt is designed for elastic materials. I made the model skirt with a pinstripe gabardine that has loads of stretch. The fabric is meant for pants, so it has a lot of elasticity which makes it comfortable to wear. With skin-tight garments this is an extremely important point. A skirt like this can feel absolutely horrible if made with the wrong material!

Mermaid Skirt

The Mermaid Skirt features bondage-inspired details. I wanted it to have a Gothic feel, but in a sophisticated way. A flattering shape gives the skirt a feminine, ladylike silhouette, while subtle details make it totally bad ass.

Our bondage-inspired Mermaid Skirt features a lacing at the back of the knees, embellished pockets, and shaped waist band. With an option to decorate the skirt with D-rings, the style is versatile and cute in the dark sense of the word. The long, widening hem is trumpet-shaped. This style can be made into a knee-length pencil skirt as well. With a figure-hugging shape, this skirt is designed to flatter an hourglass figure.

The Mermaid Skirt has sewn on pockets. The pockets are naturally entirely optional, but they add an interesting detail to the bondage-flavoured skirt. With a lacing on them, the pockets repeat the detail at the back of the knees, tying the design together. With D-rings, the skirt has a unique, Gothic-inspired look.

Bondage-inspired mermaid skirt pocket detail

For the model skirt, I used pinstripe-patterned gabardine. Aligning stripes was quite challenging: with curved seams, this skirt demands a lot from patterned fabrics. Luckily, gabardines come in a variety of delicious shades of black. And possibly brighter colors as well.

Though the pattern comes with a selection of details, feel free to add more to the skirt. With bondage-flavored garments, there can never be too many embellishments. Try a sewn-on lacing to the thigh, or add chains and belts to the hem. With things like this, only your imaginations sets limits.

Mermaid Skirt with bondage-details

I hope you’ll enjoy our bondage-inspired Mermaid Skirt Sewing Pattern! This skirt will be our featured product this week and the next along with another skirt.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Bishop Wrap

Wrap dresses are lovely and elegant. They flatter all body types, and can be styled up for nearly any occasion. The belts, though, can be a bit annoying at times. A cute bow is pretty to look at, and loose belts create an interesting detail, but they make styling a wrap dress all the more difficult. I wanted a wrap dress that would have an open hem, a revealing neckline, and no belts or buttons. I also wanted to incorporate my favorite sleeve style to the design. Thus was born our brand new wrap dress sewing pattern, The Bishop Wrap.

The Bishop Wrap has a long hem that’s open on both sides up to the hip. It comes with a daring neckline that can be made with or without a gathered detail. This dress is best made with elastic materials such as light viscose or cotton jersey. I made mine in black, but this style loves wild prints and bright colors. 

A viscose jersey similar to the one I used is available on amazon. I also picked out a beautiful green snake print viscose jersey. If you purchase materials through the links below, I might make a little extra.
Black Viscose Spandex Fabric, Causal Jersey Knit Fabric, Fabric by the Yard – 1 YARD
Snakeskin Print Viscose Stretch Jersey Knit Dress Fabric Green – per metre

The Bishop Wrap has long, wide sleeves that are gathered at the wrist with a tight cuff. I personally love this sleeve style. It’s feminine and comfortable, and bears a vintage feel. The bishop sleeve was hugely popular in the sixties, and I actually have a few vintage patterns that rock this style.

This wrap dress pattern comes with a full length hem. I highly recommend using a light fabric for this dress. The hem takes a lot of fabric, and a heavy material can make it stretch and pull in wear. A light material makes the dress comfortable to wear.

The Bishop Wrap loves belts and corsets. It can be paired with all kinds of waist enhancing accessories. This dress also likes the company of cardigans and shrugs. Next week, I’ll show you how to rock this wrap dress in two different Everyday With an Edge -posts!

As you may have guessed, The Bishop Wrap Dress Pattern is our featured product for the coming week. It will be on sale for all VIPs, so now’s a good time to join our mailing list to gain access to the special offer.

I hope you’ll enjoy The Bishop Wrap! I’ll see you on Tuesday!

Love,

Heather

Pretty Basic Party Dress

In the previous post, I showed you the dress I wore on my Birthday. It’s based on our sewing pattern called The Pretty Basic Party Dress. Today, I get to share the first post featuring this dress!

I originally made The Pretty Basic Party Dress during the winter. Publishing it took a bit longer than usual due to a surprising amount of technical difficulties. I’m happy to say that it seems like I won’t have to spend so much time with technical details with our site, and can start focusing on creating patterns again. There are a few coming soon, but I’ll tell you more about them later.

Today, we’re focusing on the new dress.

The Pretty Basic Party Dress continues the line of Pretty Basics. These styles are designed to be easy to sew and comfy to wear. They can also be mixed and matched. The Pretty Basic Party Dress is the latest addition. It goes with The Pretty Basic Cardigan and The Garter Petticoat. I’m currently working on a Pretty Basic Vortex Shawl, and that will also pair up nicely with this dress.

The Pretty Basic Party Dress is made with viscose jersey and mesh. The dress has a seamless yoke and flared sleeves. The yoke and lower sleeves are designed to be made with see-through material. You can naturally choose any kind of fabric for the dress: no part of it needs to be translucent if you don’t like that.

The Pretty Basic Party Dress has an A-lined hem. The dress is fitted at the waist, and widens toward the hem. The model dresses are both quite short, but you can easily lengthen the hem if you so choose.

The dress is designed to be super-easy to make. It’s best made with elastic fabrics, but the techniques used are beginner-friendly. I’d say that the most challenging part is binding the neckline.

I’ve made three versions of the dress now, and will probably make more. The style is really cute, and the dress is unbelievable comfortable. I made the second version with lighter viscose jersey and elastic lace. I made the sleeves in elbow-length simply by leaving out the lower sleeve and lengthening the pattern a bit. I bound the cuffs with strips of fabric to match the neckline.

These dresses are best made with viscose jersey and elastic lace fabric.

The Pretty Basic Party dress is our featured product until October 16th. It will be on sale, but only for VIPs. If you wish to gain access to the offer, hurry up and sign up to our mailing list. Newsletters go out on Fridays at around 7:00PM GMT+3!

I hope you’ll enjoy The Pretty Basic Party Dress.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather