Archive / Sewing

RSS feed for this section

Cute SkaterDress

As you may have noticed, I really like dresses. I have literally dozens of dresses, and I hardly ever wear anything but dresses. They’re so easy to pull on and accessorize. And the best part is, despite the fact that dresses are ridiculously comfy, wearing one makes you look chic no matter what. Though I have plenty of dresses, I keep making more. Last week, I made a cute skaterdress by just combining a spaghetti-strap top to a hem I quickly sewed up.

The story of the dress goes like this.

I had a top dug up from who-knows-where. It was a bit too short to be worn with a skirt, but I really liked the color and the velvet print. My website was down last week, and to make myself feel better, I decided to treat myself to a new dress. The top would serve as its foundation.

top on its way to becoming a cute skaterdress

I had black viscose jersey stashed up. I used some of it to sew an A-lined, wide hem for the top. Patterning and cutting were done using the proven method of “it’s just jersey, what could possibly go wrong!”

… nothing major, just had to take the waist in a little.

hem waiting to be attached

After sewing up the hem, I attached the pieces at the waist. When doing this, you’ll want to make certain the seam will sit at the narrowest part of the waist, and that it’s a snug fit. Otherwise the seam will bulge.

almost there!

I did a basic rolled hem on the dress. It’s a quick, easy finish for a casual dress. It works really well on jersey, since it won’t eat at the elasticity of the fabric, but lives along with the material. For everyday dresses meant for nothing fancier than a dinner at the local pub it’s the perfect choice. If you’re making something more special, try trimming hems with lace.

I really like the way my dress turned out. I wore it last week, and paired it with a mesh top and a tulle petticoat beneath, and a basic elastic belt over the seam.

cute skater dress all done!

I hope you enjoyed reading about my new cute skaterdress!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Loki Corset

Once upon a time three years ago, I got a bit carried away right before Halloween. I got a grand idea to go as Loki, and made a corset out of black fake leather and green cotton. I got sidetracked half-way through, and the corset was forgotten. I found my Loki Corset again a month or so ago, and decided to feature it in the I Made This! -section today.

I actually meant to do this yesterday, but I had the misfortune of coming down with a flu. I was literally too sick form a comprehensible sentence, but today I’m feeling much better. Not very pretty, though.

The Loki Corset is loosely based on the DeathRock Bustier Sewing Pattern. I used the pattern as a basic shape, and modified it with a heavy hand. I added a lot of details, steel boning, and front closure.

The criss-cross button closure is a thing I like to use when making light corsets that aren’t meant for tight-lacing. It has a unique look, and makes the garment comfy to wear. I most often use spiral steel boning which is flexible and forgiving, so this style of closure only works when you don’t want a very tight corset.

All the details of my Loki Corset are sewn on. I embellished each pair of pieces separately without a plan. I used a lot of piping for this too add as much green as I could. I wanted to avoid vertical lines, though, and decided to use black twill for bone channels. This solution gives more space to the diagonal embellishments.

The back of the corset has a very basic lacing. I like to use long satin ribbons with this one. They add a feminine detail to the style. The corset is complete with a modesty panel, naturally with my initials sewn into it.

I meant to wear my Loki Corset out on Friday, but a late dinner made me change my mind. This little mistake paired with the flu I got means you’ll have to settle for a headless shot of the corset being worn…

Though this piece hasn’t gotten much actual wear, I love it to bits. It’s comfy, unique, and pretty. I hope you enjoyed reading about it!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Pink Tote Bag

Fabric totes are available to buy in almost any store. They also come free with ads on them. Last summer, I found myself carrying a black one that advertised a group of magazines, and got to thinking.

I’m a Goth, so why shouldn’t my tote compliment that?

Going through my stash, I found some pink mystery fabric. Though I had my heart set on a black tote, I chose to use the pink fabric.

Mainly because I didn’t have anything black stashed… For some strange reason, everything black gets used up pretty quick and all that remains, are the pink and red materials.

An entirely pink tote would have been a bit much. To make it less so, I added black details.

The handles are embellished with a black rolled hem. They’re attached to the tote with black buttons. I top-stitched them using a black zigzag, and did the same with almost every seam of the tote.

To secure the tulle in place, I embroidered the tote by hand. I used a very basic stitch, sewing curving lines to the fabric. I also attached smaller black buttons to the tote. They serve no purpose other than pleasing the eye.

Sewing the tote took me about 45 minutes, minus the embroidery, and the end result is really quite nice. It’s so nice to go out for groceries or whatever when I can carry them home in a tote that looks like Me!

Sewing a tote is quite easy. The internet is full of tutorials, but I like one better than the rest. Bane from GIY made a super-cool tute for a tote that’s easy to store in a purse, and has an amazing carrying capacity. The fun thing about sewing totes is that you can take a basic pattern, and mod it to look like You by using a fabric with a fun print, or by adding embellishments like I did.

I hope you’ll have fun making your own totes!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

HandBag with Pink Lining

Every now and again, I get bored with all of my purses. A normal person would just go to a shop and buy a new one, but I venture in sewing handbags myself. Or at least trying to.

Sometimes, I get to say “oh my that went sooo horribly wrong” and quietly get rid of the evidence, but once and again, I come up with something that’s actually quite cool.

I found some black leather in my stash, and decided to want a bowler purse. I’ve always kinda wanted one, but never gotten around to finding one. As the leather just screamed to be a bag, I thought I’d give sewing handbags a go.

Going through my stash, I found a pink skirt with a black comic print on it. Someone had given it to me a long time ago, and since I didn’t want to wear it, I chose to sacrifice it for a higher purpose.

I cut out the pieces using the good old “I’m just eyeballing it” -method. I’m a true follower of this school of patterning, and use it often when sewing for myself.

I cut out two pockets for the outside of the bag, and two for the inside. I sewed a zipper to one of the inside pockets using the easiest method available. Take a short zip, cut a rectangular piece of fabric for the pocket and a narrow strip to hem the pocket with, sew the zip in between, and just sew the piece on the lining. It’s super-easy, and saves you the headache of doing a welted pocket.

I aligned the pockets with the bottom of the purse, so that they would endure more strain.

I’m always worried about losing my keys. When making this purse, I came up with the cleverest idea I’ve had in, well, all my life.

I took a D-ring, and attached it to the side seam of the lining.

I then took a parrot clasp, and attached it to my key ring.

After finishing the purse, I can just attach the parrot clasp to the D-ring, and never have to worry about accidentally pulling out my keys again!

I’m quite happy about the way the purse turned out. It’s large enough to house all the things I need when stepping out (including various notebooks), and cute enough to take along to a casual party. The zipper closure is practical, and the lining makes it extra-special.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my cool new purse!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather