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Stripy Wrist Warmers

In the world of crafting, left-over yarn is a rule. It’s always around, and sometimes, it’s difficult to find a use for little balls and skeins. As I was given an opportunity to write a guest post for Craftic, I chose to create these cute, stripy wrist warmers to share. The wrist warmers require basic skills in both knitting and crocheting. Stitches used are very simple, so I would label this as a beginner level project. 

stripy wrist warmers worked in black and purple

Materials

  • sport weight yarn in two tones. The amount of yarn needed depends on how long you wish to make the wrist warmers. For the black and purple ones, I worked 10 contrast colored stripes and used 50 grams (142 yards) of yarn in total.

  • double-pointed needles size 3,5mm/US 4

  • crochet hook size 3,5mm/US 4 and 4mm/US 6

  • tapestry needle for weaving in ends

Notes

The wristwarmers come in three sizes, S (M), and L. Size S suits an arm of 20 cm/ 7.8 inches in diameter, size M 22 cm/ 8.6 inches, and size L 24 cm/ 9.45 inches. Gauge (taken from a wristwarmer while it’s worn) is 8 stitches and 24 rows in a 5 cm x 5 cm / 2” x 2” square.

Abbreviations

K – knit

P – purl

DC – double crochet

* * – repeat

Pattern

Cast on 40 (44) 48 stitches on DPNs with black yarn, divide them eavenly, and join to knit in the round. The wristwarmers are worked in *K2, P2* -rib up until the crochet cuff.

Counting in the foundation row, work four rows of rib with black yarn. Switch to purple, and work two rows. Alternating the stripe pattern of *four rows in black, two rows in purple*, work in the round until the wristwarmer is approx 15cm/ 6 inches long. Finish with a black stripe.

Switch to the smaller crochet hook. From the beginning of the first row, pick up two stitches onto your hook. Crochet them together with a slip stitch, and chain four. In between of the two stitches you just crocheted together, double crochet.

DC the next two stitches together, chain two, and DC in between the two stitches crocheted together. Continue like this through the row.

Switch to hook size 4mm/ US 6.

Row 1: Into each arch formed by two chain stitches, DC three times.

Row 2-5: Using slip stitches, move to the middle DC of the first group. Chain two, and DC twice. *DC three times into the middle stitch of the next group.* Slip stitch to close the round.

Row 6: Using slip stitches, move to the middle DC of the first group. Chain two, and DC four times. Single crochet in between groups. *DC five times into the middle stitch of the next group, single crochet in between groups.* Slip stitch to close the round.

Cast off, and weave in ends.

stripy wrist warmers worked in double rib and crochet lace

 I hope you’ll enjoy The Stripy Wrist Warmers Knit/Crochet Pattern!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Black and Blue Gloves

After creating The Pretty Basic Blazer pattern, I had some yarn left over. There wasn’t enough for a top or a skirt, but still too much for just a pair of short fingerless gloves. As fall was drawing near, I decided to use the yarn for a pair of black and blue gloves.

The yarn I used for The Basic Blazer was a combination of two threads. I took a ball of black, super-slippery polyester, and a ball of petrol-blue acrylic. Together, they formed a two-toned yarn thick enough to work with a larger hook. As I worked the blazer, the tones intertwined with each other, creating an interesting surface. The blazer is crocheted, but I wanted to see how the two yarns would work together in knit.

I didn’t want to cast on a huge project, and there was a limited amount of yarn, so I chose to cast on cabled gloves. This style is actually a pre-version of the upcoming sister-patterns called Lovelace and Purlace.

I chose a classic cable pattern for the back of the gloves, and worked an Indian thumb gusset to them. The yarn behaved beautifully, turning and twisting with stitches, giving me some that seemed blue, some that seemed black, and some that showed off both colors. As the cable pattern is pretty simple, it didn’t clash with the two-toned yarn.

The cuffs of the gloves are pretty long. I get cold easily, and winter coats often have sleeves that are just a little bit too short. Longer gloves keep my wrists warm even when it’s really cold outside.

Here in Finland, it’s often really cold outside, so I’m glad I chose to work a longer cuff.

The body of the gloves along with fingers are worked in basic stockinette. After finishing the gloves, I started thinking.

Gloves are meant to be tight, and stockinette leaves a rough surface on the inside. The idea of reverse stockinette gloves was born from that little inconvenience.

The cable on the inside of the wrist also gave me an idea.

The palm of a glove is often left plain. I don’t see a reason of functionality to that, so with Lovelace, I carried a cable through the thumb gusset. I kinda regret not doing that with the black and blues as well, but I’m still happy with my cabled, two-toned gloves.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Black and Blue Gloves!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Black and White Gloves

Every autumn, I decide to need a new pair of basic gloves. I usually only wear black ones though I’ve made a pair in red, another in black and blue, and one in sunny yellow. The latest finished ones are black and white gloves.

I used a basic glove pattern I have memorized for these ones. The gloves have an Indian thumb gusset, which is one of my favorite techniques. The gusset is super-easy to work, and since it follows the shape of the palm, it makes gloves really comfy to wear. I’ve incorporated the Indian thumb gusset into one pattern I’ve made. The What to do With the Rest Mitts is a free pattern for fingerless gloves, and it can be found here on Ravelry, and here in our own store.

Looking around the internet, I noted that knitting pattern for basic gloves are relatively scarce. Harry Wells has written a free pattern, which can be found on Ravelry, but it features a different kind of thumb gusset. The pattern’s quite good, though, and I highly recommend it.

To spruce up my basic gloves, I decided to make them stripy. I had black and white yarns stashed, and though I know the white will turn gray pretty soon, I chose to risk it. Neutral colors won’t clash with anything, so if I’m feeling very adventurous, I might pair the gloves with an outfit splashed with red or purple.

The hand of the gloves is worked with single-row stripes. On the cuffs, I went with wider rows. This way, the gloves have a bit more going on. Thinner and wider stripes create an interesting surface even when worked with only two tones.

After finishing the gloves, I still had some yarn left. In order to get rid of some of it, I crocheted six small flowers. I sewed them onto the gloves, three on each, and found myself very happy with the choice.

Gloves are often left plain, mainly because heavy embellishments tend to get caught on sleeves and bags and passers-by. Light decorations, though, are sometimes a nice way to give a little more oomph to gloves and mittens.

I hope you enjoyed reading about my Black and White Gloves!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather