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Crochet Dress and Cardigan

A while back, I mentioned a little crochet project I was working on. Cotton and lace is a combo I really like, so one thing led to another. Instead of one lace garment, I now have two!

I found a basic pattern for a lace dress on Novita’s site many, many years ago. I loved it, but didn’t dare try it. After gathering more experience and courage in crocheting, I went back looking for the crochet dress pattern. Novita had taken it down, but I managed to dig up a chart for the lace repeat. I memorized it, tried to make a dress, and failed miserably.

This spring, I tried again.

The lace repeat is relatively simple, but still lovely to look at. It’s airy and light, and reminds me of spiderwebs.

I used two hook sizes with the dress, 3mm and 3,5m. Upping the hook size at the hip gave the hem of the dress a bit more room and saved me from adding more stitches. This style is started at the empire line, and worked both up and down from there. The sleeves are worked separately, and the dress has a zipper in the back.

The dress turned out really pretty. I can’t remember how long I’ve wanted to make one, and now that I have, I want another one!

Crochet Dress worked with black cotton

After finishing the crochet dress, I sill had some yarn left. As spring was coming along, I figured I needed more lace. I didn’t have a cute, comfy cardigan to wear out, so I decided to need one.

I cast on another lace project, and before I knew it, I had my cute cardie.

Like the dress, this one is worked both up and down from the empire line. I added a triple crochet row there just in case I wanted to slip a contrast coloured satin ribbon in.

I left the cardie pretty short, and only used a 3mm hook.

I plan to wear this cardigan with dresses only, so I felt comfortable leaving the hem open. The cardigan closes only at the bust, which makes it perfect to wear even with waist corsets. Bright colours push through the lace, and make the cardigan super-cute over red and blue dresses.

The red dress will soon be published as a pattern. I’m planning to add more items to the Pretty Basics, and the figure-hugging dress will be the first in line. I’m also planning to start posting outfit photos on IG, so be sure to follow me there, too!

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my crochet dress and cardigan!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Modding a Green Coat

A long time ago, I made a coat with green wool fabric. I used a Burda pattern for the first time, and found it a really nice fit. The finished coat was a bit green for my taste. After I found it neglected in my closet, I decided to add a bit of black to it. 

Deciding how to start the embellished coat took some time. I pondered between lace, ribbons, and applique, I wanted the details to be thick and to really stand out. After rummaging around in my stash, I found black yarn left over from my black Elise shawl. The shawl is thick and warm, a perfect winter accessory, and I wanted to bring some of its warmth to my green coat.

I also found a really big crochet flower, which pretty much determined what I wanted to do with the yarn.

I took the flower, and sewed it onto the coat’s right pocket. Then, I took the yarn and crocheted smaller flowers into a string of chain stitches.

I ended up with a yard and a half of flowers…

I arranged the chain of flowers onto the coat, deciding to do the decorations on one side only. I then sewed them on by hand.

Had I known it would take forever, I might have chosen a different approach!

The result is lovely, though, and I’m happy with my choice. The flowers take away some of the coat’s greenness, and since the details are quite thick, they give the coat a bit of play with light and shadow.

The coat’s sleeves were a bit on the short side. I have long arms, and patterns often let me down in sleeve length. To give the sleeves a bit more length, I added a filet crochet cuff inside them. Though it’s not that long, it gives the coat more warmth, and serves as a pretty eye-catcher. Worn with long gloves, the coat is now nice to wear before the coldest winter days and as they start to pass.

Though I like the coat now with the black embellishments, I might add a bit more to it. The left sleeve is still quite green, and I’m thinking another string of flowers would look nice around it. The front hem of the coat might like some singular flowers, and maybe there could be a little detail on the neck…

Some projects are difficult to finish only because working on them is so much fun, and this coat is one of them.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Green Coat Mod!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Why I Love to Crochet

Lace is one of my favorite things to wear. It’s feminine and delicate, but often a bit too fancy for everyday clothes.

Crochet garments can be made with all kinds of materials. I like to play with cotton and large hooks. This combo makes lace cardigans and dresses suitable for almost any everyday occasion, from shopping to casual dinners. Using simple lace patterns also serves to enhance the wearability of crochet garments.

Most of the things I crochet are black. Two of my latest crochet projects are a dress and cardigan both made with the same lace. I found the pattern for both on Novita’s website in the year I-forget, must have been 2006ish, but sadly, they’ve since given the site a make-over. That means the patterns can’t be found anywhere. I’ve literally turned the internet upside-down in search of it, but came out empty handed. The lace repeat is lovely, though, and it’s found its place among my favorites. It’s airy, it’s easy, and it totally works for an office-cardie.

I’m hoping to show you the finished items soon!

Crochet lace can look intimidating. For me, it did seem like an impossible thing to master. I was literally afraid of trying for years, but once I did, it dawned on me that most lace is created with basic stitches. Know how to chain, single- and double crochet, and you’re good to go. Even the simplest stitches can make an intricate surface. This is clearly seen with Evan Plevinski’s Elise Shawl. The pattern doesn’t have a difficult stitch in it, and the result is just beautiful.

I’ve made two so far, a red one for Mom, and a purple one for me. Mine turned out really big, though I haven’t gotten around to properly blocking it!

Lace is a versatile texture. It ‘s beautiful and feminine, and easier to create than one imagines. It brings a touch of luxury into everyday life, and that’s the reason why I love crocheting so much.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Long Scarves

After finishing the Black and Blue Gloves I wrote about last week, I still had plenty of yarn left. I wanted to use it on an accessory that would go with the Pretty Basic Blazer. Shawls and snoods were out of the question along with wrist-warmers and gloves. Scarves, however, seemed quite interesting. They’re easy to wear with pretty much anything, and I didn’t really have a long crochet scarf. As I needed a quick and easy project, I set to creating a long, long crochet scarf.

The yarn is a combination of two strands of acrylic, one black and one petrol blue. Together, they make one yarn thick enough to be worked with a 5mm/US 8 hook. I used a super-simple stitch which creates a nice, airy surface. Both of the yarns I used are upcycled, so getting more was out of the question.

The scarf grew long, and I still had yarn. I really wanted to get rid of it all, so I worked a shell edge around the scarf. It created a nice, feminine border to a pretty basic scarf.

The long crochet scarf was a really nice accessory. So nice, in fact, that I needed another one.

I found some black cotton in my stash, and used it for a black version of the simple scarf. I embellished the black scarf with crochet flowers, attaching them to both sides of the scarf’s long ends. On a style like this, it’s nice to get both sides to look pretty. As the scarf moves, all of it will be visible.

These both styles are based on The Hooded Scarf Crochet Pattern. There are two version of the pattern out there. A free version can be found on Blogger. That one is a recipe-style, and not very detailed. A paid version can be bought here at heatherwielding.com and Ravelry. It’s priced at 1€ here, and a bit higher on Ravelry due to their fees. The paid version is more detailed, and it includes instructions on how to crochet the flowers on the scarf. It also includes recipe-style instructions on how to create the long crochet scarves featured in this post.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my crochet scarves!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Pink Cthulhu

For me, Tuesday was one of those days when you’re feeling a bit under the weather. To lift my spirits, I went through my stash to find a cute yarn to crochet something quick and easy with, I came out with pink cotton, and decided I wanted to make another Cthulhu to keep company to the green one I’d made before.

I know these guys are usually green, but who knows, maybe this Elder God happened upon a mysterious mutation of Upgrade Cuteness Level to the Max.

Amigurumis are still an area not-that-well-known to me. I know the basics, naturally, but still need patterns in order to work a design with more details.

Early last year, I crocheted a green Cthulhu with the help of Rural Rebellion’s pattern. As I searched for it today, I noted that their website had been taken down. After a bit of searching, I found the pattern I’d used before. It can be found here, but I don’t know if the link will be live for long.

I really like the pattern, it’s well-written and clear, and I sincerely hope the website will be renewed soon.

For the pink Cthulhu, I used two strands of pink upcycled cotton. It’s a really light shade of pink which reminds me of cotton candy. The tone is pretty, but when I try to imagine the yarn as a garment, something hurts and says NO. For amigurumis, though, it’s pretty perfect.

I cast the Cthulhu on at around 1pm, and cast off at around 9pm. I took breaks to do a bit of work and to say bye to the better half who went off on a business trip, and to cook dinner for myself. Working on the Cthulhu took, to my reckoning, about five hours.

The finished product created using a 5mm (US8) hook is about 13 cm high. The Cthulhu has curling tentacles, which were really fun to work with, and wings attached to its back.

For the eyes, I used black plastic buttons. I sewed them on while working on the head, so I could still easily reach the inside of the work.

I really like the way the Pink Cthulhu turned out. Though the color is a bit unconventional. I think it adds to the original design’s chubby cuteness.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Pink Cthulhu!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather