Faerie Dragon Shawlette

A while back, I showed you a shawlette made with wild colors. Back then, I promised to write it into a pattern. Well, I’m happy to announce, that today is the day I finally get to publish it. The beautiful vortex was renamed, and I am proud to introduce The Faerie Dragon Shawlette.

Again.

Faerie Dragon Shawlette

As I mentioned when I first shared the shawlette, I got two gorgeous skeins of merino-silk for my Birthday. They were very unusual colors for me, and the person who gave them to me was actually a bit antsy about whether or not I’d like them. Well, I didn’t. I loved them! I loved the yarns so much I really just wanted to sit down in the middle of the floor and start knitting right there and then.

I resisted the urge, but not for long. You see, the yarns screamed that they wanted to become a vortex scarf, and be together forever. My only doubt at this was whether there’d be enough for a scarf. I quickly decided that if the scarf would be too small to wear, I’d just hang it somewhere and look at it.

Turns out there was plenty for a scarf. After a bath, the scarf grew into a long shawlette.

Faerie Dragon With Black Dress

The yarns were an absolute joy to work with. The colors were vibrant and full of life, and the luxurious merino-silk was a sheer indulgence. I didn’t check to see how long it took to knit the shawlette, but it couldn’t have been more than two weeks. I worked The Faerie Dragon in garter stitch and eyelet lace, so it was a zero-concentration-required -kind of project. I actually picked simple stitches for this shawlette so that I’d get to admire the colors more closely when knitting.

Faerie Dragon Curve

The Faerie Dragon Shawlette is now available as a knitting pattern. It’s our featured product for this week and next so you’ll be seeing more of it in later posts! Since this is a winter accessory, I’m planning to create some warmer, layered outfits to go with it. And as you know, featured products are on sale, but only for VIPs. If you haven’t already, order our newsletter to gain access to these special offers.

Faerie Dragon - vortex scarf knitting pattern

I hope you’ll enjoy The Faerie Dragon as much as I enjoyed knitting it!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

WitchHunt Scarf

Every now and again, we all make something we’re not really that into. Sometimes it’s the design, sometimes the materials, often the combination of both. Not succeeding every time is the price of crafting. We invest our time and energy to a project only to realize it didn’t turn out quite as planned.

For my Birthday, I got a skein of hand-dyed yarn. I love shades of red, and this 80/20 Merino/Bamboo had the most delicious tones of red. It’s named WitchHunt, and dyed special pour moi. The yarn was really light, and I chose to work it with 3mm needles. I usually go for larger needle sizes due to impatience, but it’s actually kinda nice to sometimes work with smaller needles. 

Due to the small needles, I wanted the easiest stitch repeat ever. Garter. It makes a nice, fully reversible surface, and works really well with self-patterning yarns. After a few inches of knitting, I noted two things.

Working a shawl on small needles takes FOREVER.

And the yarn had shades of brown hidden into it.

These facts combined slowed me down quite a bit. I worked on the garter scarf whenever I was in between projects, and was pretty eager to pick up something else.

Despite my eagerness to pick up another knit, I finished the scarf. It took a whopping five months, but I finally got it done.

I got bored with garter at some point pretty early on, and worked simple lace stripes into the garter scarf. Then I noted they made knitting even slower, and counted my lucky stars for not committing to a full lace project. I knit the scarf as long as I dared, and still had a third of the skein (now of course a ball) left!

I toyed around with knitting a lace border to the scarf. The thought scared me a little, so I went with a crochet edge instead. I’m really happy with this choice. Crocheting was a lot faster than knitting, and gave the scarf a cute, frilly finish.

A this point I was actually pretty pleased with the scarf, and though it is a pretty basic scarf with nothing fancy to it, I considered turning it into a pattern.

And then I washed it.

Dying yarns is a challenging venture. There are many, many things that can go wrong with the process. I don’t feel that nice having to say this, considering they just went into business in dyeing yarns, but this skein bled like crazy. After washing this scarf, the bathroom looked like I’d killed someone in there.

The shape of the scarf is actually pretty nice. Blocking it would bring more shape to it and open the crochet lace, but I don’t really want to introduce it to water ever again. The scarf’s obvious dislike toward moisture keeps me from wanting to wear it, too. What if it rains and the scarf gets wet and starts bleeding? That’d be a “goodbye, coat” -moment.

As you see, sometimes we end up making something that doesn’t quite work. The reason why I wanted to show this garter scarf is to remind you that designers mess up, too, and more often than we’d like to admit!

This post will also set the theme for this week and next. I’m trying to get a new pattern out for Friday, so we’ll be focusing on shawls!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Grey In The Making

Cardigans aren’t only fun to wear. They’re fun to knit, too! I’m currently working on two new patterns for cardigans. Both are quite deep in the making, but I wanted to give you sneak peaks  of my works in process anyway. These designs will be fun to mix and match, and easy to knit up. Instead of funky details, these cardigans feature classic shapes.

Lately, I’ve developed a liking toward grey. It’s soft and neutral, and, well, let’s face it, easier to knit than black. Grey is subtle and elegant, and never goes out of style. The color dictated the style for the first cardigan. I wanted it to have classic lace and a V-shaped neckline. The yarn I chose for this cardigan is thick and heavy, and 100% cotton. This makes the finished (well, almost finished, I still need to weave in ends and sew in buttons) decadently heavy and delightfully warm.

I like raglan-sleeves best of all when it comes to cardigans. Knitting a top down raglan cardie is fun and relaxing, and the shape is comfortable to wear. For this style, I wanted something different. Most top down raglan cardigans have a round collar. With this design, I wanted to create a V-shaped neckline. This took so much brain work I had to turn to google for help. I found a blog post with instructions on the general process of knitting a V-neck for a raglan sweater. When I looked again, the post was nowhere to be found. I’m starting to think I might have dreamt it!

I wanted to work lace for the hem of the cardigan. Feather and Fan was the perfect choice for this design. It’s easy to knit, and the result is just lovely. The sleeves are free of lace, but they come with the option to work in purled stripes.

I’m not a big fan of after thought -buttonlists. I like to work them in while knitting, or not at all. This cardigan has seed stitch button lists. They’re worked in from cast on, so the’re will be no tasks waiting after cast off. When you’re done, you’re done. Well, there will be a few ends to weave in and buttons to sew, but no knitting buttonlists!

I really like the Feather and Fan Cardigan, and I’m hoping to get the pattern published soon.

The second WIP is also grey. This is actually a re-design of a cardigan pattern I made a long while back. It’s a short sleeved shrug-like cardigan which I’ve never learned to wear. A week or so ago I realized I had an ugly shawl worked with the same yarn as the shrug. I frogged it, ripped out the cardigan’s sleeves, and cast on long, stripy ones! I love working with this yarn, it’s a shame Novita discontinued it.

The re-vamped cardigan is going to have a light grey bodice, stripy sleeves and maybe a stripy border. I also want it embellished with a fall of crochet flowers. This project is so much fun I think I’m going to go work on it right now!

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my grey works in process.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Purple Wrap Dress

I’m going to Italy for a friend’s wedding. Actually, by the time you read this, the wedding will have happened. I needed a dress for the wedding, and naturally decided to sew one. I figured it would be quick and easy, but it took more time than I figured. I got the dress done only a day before departure! I used our Sleeveless Wrap Dress Pattern to create my purple wrap dress.

I ordered fabric online two months before the trip, and chose the style one month later. It took me an entire week to muster up enough courage to cut the dress, and once I had, sewing felt like a huge task. This dress needed to be perfect!

I didn’t want to rush sewing the purple wrap dress, so I took my time with it, over-thinking every detail. The style is simple enough, but the finishing touches took a lot of brain work.

Purple Wrap Dress with H&M heels

The dress is long, and needs to be worn with heels. For some reason, I didn’t own a single pair of basic black shoes! I put off finding a pair of heels for far too long. I finally ordered a cute pair from Zalando, and they arrived in good time. Sadly, the shoes had an exceptionally small fit, and were a pain to wear. I returned them, and was left shoeless. Charming spent an entire Saturday with me running around town looking for perfect shoes.

I’m picky, especially when it comes to footwear, so we came out empty handed. Buying a pair from Italy was of course an option, but I want to see the sights rather than shop!

There’s an H&M right next door, and it was our last stop. They had a cheap, black high heeled shoe that was OK, so I just got those. It’s better to buy a not-so-nice pair and stumble upon a nicer pair by accident than to risk it and not have anything to wear.

Purple Wrap Dress - belt detail

I used a thick satin for the purple wrap dress. The material is pretty on both sides, so going with The Wrap Dress Pattern was an easy choice. I could even make the dress without a lining, and not have to worry about the hem or belts revealing a turn-side of the fabric.

I made the belts really long so that I can change the way I tie them. I added a few pleats to where they’re attached to the dress. This helps the belt fit through a small hole on the side seam. It also adds a cute little detail.

Purple Wrap Dress - collar detail

I wanted to do something different with the pattern. The original pattern is a pretty basic sleeveless wrap dress. This version needed to be near-formal, so I made the hem long. I shaped the sleeve gaps a bit, and pretty much got rid of the shoulders. I then added a large collar to the dress.

The satin is a rich, beautiful purple. As I was starting with this project, I figured I might add a bit of black lace to the dress. After the dress began to take shape, I realized the fabric was too lovely to hide. I really like this color, and though I might only wear my purple wrap dress once, I’m so happy I made it for my BFFs big day. The dress is all wrinkled up from sewing in these photos. I hope you’ll forgive me for that!

Purple Wrap Dress

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my purple wrap dress!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Red Party Dress

This week, our theme has been The Pretty Basic Party Dress. I really like the style: it’s easy to sew, super-comfy, and perfect for informal little parties. I’ve made a few variations of the dress, including the dress I wore on my Birthday. Today, I wanted to show you another mod based on the pattern. I call this one The Red Party Dress. Unlike the previous dresses, this one is made with non-elastic materials!

I made this dress a few years back, actually. I needed something special for Mom’s and Dad’s 70th. Something that wasn’t black. Luckily, I had something red(ish) stashed. I also had a bit of lace left over from an order. Combining the two fabrics was an easy choice, and so was the style. A yoked dress with a long hem is classic and pretty, and not too fancy for a small party.

I used a lace fabric with a scallop edge. The lace has a little bit of stretch, but only enough to make it comfortable to wear. I was also running very low on it. I wanted long sleeves, but the limited quantity forced me to quilt a bit. I cut the upper and lower sleeve on the lace, and covered the seam with a strip cut on the scallop edge. This solution gave me a pretty detail, and hid the fact that I had to improvise a little.

I made the yoke with more scraps of lace. I didn’t have a zipper long enough to reach the neck, and since I was very low on time, I made the back with a slit. I used a scalloped lace strip to bind the slit and the neckline.

Lace fabrics with a scallop edge can be a bit intimidating. I’m always tempted to cut pattern pieces from the scalloped edge. Cutting the edge off, and using it to hem garments in another viable option. Playing with lace and adding it to dresses is fun, and makes garment feel special. Lace fabrics are available in almost any fabric store, including amazon. I dug around a bit, and found a lovely lace in many pretty colors. If you purchase fabrics via the links below, I might earn a little extra.
58″ Aqua Scalloped Floral Pattern Lace Fabric by the Yard – 1 Yard
58″ Peach Papaya Scalloped Floral Pattern Lace Fabric by the Yard – 1 Yard
58″ Lilac Scalloped Floral Pattern Lace Fabric by the Yard – 1 Yard
58″ Navy Scalloped Floral Pattern Lace Fabric by the Yard – 1 Yard

Attaching the yoke to the red part was an easy job, but the seam looked very strict. To make it softer, I added another strip of lace. The pretty edge made all the difference, and the seam turned out quite nice.

The bodice and hem are one piece shaped only at the side seams, and the center back seam. Sewing a zipper into a curved seam is a nightmare, but with a lot of basting, it came out fine. Mom was very happy with my choice of attire, but I’ve only worn the dress once after their party!

That one time was my first actual date with Charming. I’d been thinking about taking the dress apart and using it for something else, but now it has sentimental value. I guess I’ll just have to learn to wear red. Accessories can turn a dress around entirely. Making this one more Me shouldn’t be that difficult.

Red Party Dress - Black lace yoke with long red hem

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Red Party Dress!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Escalator Ate My Dress!

I didn’t have the best day yesterday. I slept poorly and woke up too early. I decided to have a knitting day, but I didn’t have anything interesting on the needles. Leafing through Facebook, I noted that Eurokangas was having a flash sale on select items. As I didn’t have anything urgent planned, I deemed myself worthy of retail therapy. I had my coffee while playing Hearthstone, threw on my favorite long jersey dress, and headed out.

I met my spouse, whom I call Charming, in the city center and went to the fabric store while he ran an errand. I couldn’t find anything I liked, and after he came to collect me, we left empty-handed.

On the way out, the most terrifying thing happened. I wore a long dress, and stepped on an escalator like I’d done a hundred times before, without giving it a second thought. As the steps grew smaller and smaller, disappearing into a dark no-man’s-land, I realized, to my horror, that my dress followed!

I thought I screamed, but was later told that I let out the smallest sound, one little word.

help

Had I been alone, I would have just stood there on receding steps, desperately clinging on to my dress without the faintest idea of what else to do. Luckily, Charming was there to hit the emergency-button. That stopped the stairs from moving, but I was caught.

He ran back up, got scissors from a very startled clerk, and cut me loose. There was little else to do, and my dress came out horridly mutilated. I couldn’t believe that an escalator ate my dress! I thought this only happened in nightmares!

escalator ate my dress

A “normal” person would have just tossed the dress, but I’m crafty. I really like this dress, and wanted to save it.

I had a few options, but I decided to cut the hem at knee-length.

The surgery left me with some undamaged fabric which I decided to use to mod the sleeves. The original dress had short sleeves. I’m not that into the “short dress with short sleeves” -concept, so I went ahead to alter the sleeves.

I cut off the original cuffs…

and cut out two A-lined pieces to lengthen the sleeves with. This process would leave me with long trumpet sleeves with seams above the elbow.

The original dress is made with plain viscose jersey. I was working on turning the dress into a pattern, but I hadn’t taken product pictures of it before the accident. I’m thinking I might go ahead with the pattern, and wrap two styles into one, but who knows. I might even order viscose jersey on amazon, and make myself a new dress! I was looking through their selection, and found a lovely medium weight viscose jersey in various colors. This would be perfect for practically all of our Pretty Basics. If you purchase fabric through the links below, I might earn a little extra.
Black Viscose Spandex Fabric, Casual Jersey Knit Fabric
Eggplant Viscose Spandex Fabric, Casual Jersey Knit Fabric
Magenta DK Viscose Spandex Fabric, Casual Jersey Knit Fabric

I had elastic lace stashed for emergencies, and this was nothing short of one. I used the lace to bind the hem and sleeves.

The entire process to save the dress took about an hour, and I’m super-happy that I took the time to do it. The dress turned out cute and comfy, and the lace gives it a lovely detail. I’d completely forgotten how much I love trumpet sleeves!

The new and improved dress really likes the company of Lovelace and Lune, too!

I hope you’ve enjoyed this true story about the day when an escalator ate my dress.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Lovelace and Purlace

Temperatures have dropped drastically here in Finland. Leaves are starting to turn yellow, and it smells like frost outside. It’s not yet cold enough to switch to winter clothes, but chilly enough to dig out scarves and gloves. This time of year I go for blazers, warm scarves, and fingerless gloves. Today, I wanted to show you some of my favorites, and an upcoming pattern for super-pretty gloves!

I like accessories with little detail. Lace shawls aren’t really my thing, though they are beautiful to look at. Simple things with interesting texture are more to my personal taste. I created Lune last winter, and it quickly became my second favorite scarf. Lune’s easy to wear, stripy, and so basic it goes with almost any outfit. I love the pattern so much I made two!

Lune is a knitting pattern for a crescent shawl

The original Lune is black and green. My second one is made with black and purple stripes with Novita’s Nalle. It’s a Finnish wool blend that is available in any store and in any color and at an affordable price. It would be a really good deal, if the yarn didn’t love my forefinger so much. Two hours of knitting, and it’s dug its way inside no matter how much tape I hide it under. The yarn is warm, though, and somehow makes its way into Christmas presents. Right now I only have one ball stashed, and I’m hoping Nalle hasn’t found out where I live now.

Anyway, I used black and purple Nalle for a Lune last winter. I really like this scarf, and a long soak in fabric softener took away some of the hardness. I’d really like to know how Novita has managed to make it so rough and painful to work…

My black and purple Lune has a crochet shell edge to give it a more feminine vibe. The original version is unisex, but this one fits a lady’s wardrobe better. After casting off, I still had some purple yarn left. I divided to ball in two, and used to work fingerless Lovelace gloves.

The Lovelace pattern came out last spring. I had horrible timing in launching the pattern: Lovelace came out just when everyone wanted to start working on light cotton garments for the summer! The Lovelace pattern will be our featured product through next week along with its sister-pattern, Purlace, and Lune.

I worked the original Lovelace Gloves in an unusual color. I found a ball of yellow mystery yarn (it loved to burrow its way into my finger, so it must have been Nalle), and it wanted really badly to become a pair of intricate lace gloves. The Lovelace pattern took its sweet time to come out, but the gloves are beautiful.

After casting off Lovelace, I cast on another pair of lace gloves with the same general idea of lace columns continuing from wrist to hand to fingers. I worked these in black Nalle, and decided to wait until fall to launch the pattern. Now’s the time, and Purlace will come out on Friday!

I hope you’ll enjoy our Lovelace and Purlace patterns!

Until Friday!

Love,

Heather

Seed Stitch Shawl

On Friday, I promised you two outfit posts for this week. Still, I wanted to show you guys something I made!

Fall is almost here, and it’s time to dig out shawls and gloves. I took a quick peek around my winter wardrobe, and remembered I haven’t showed you my favorite shawl. I think it may be because the shawl is a very basic triangle, black, and worked in seed stitch. As lovely as it is to wear, it’s not very photogenic.

See?

I made the shawl with Novita’s Rose. It’s worked from side to side, entirely in seed stitch. Knitting this was the most boring task ever, and I watched loads of movies during the process. I’ve grown a liking toward seed stitch, but knitting it is just plain old boring. The surface seed stitch creates is lovely, and seed stitch garments are super elastic. The stitch is versatile, too. I’ve used it in so many things I can’t even count that far.

After casting off, I decided to add a little crochet border to my seed stitch shawl. I like lace, and the shawl seemed to need a little something to make it special. I just did a basic picot edge, but it did add a cute detail to the shawl.

I usually wear this around my neck during the coldest winter, but it is big enough to wear as a shawl. For outfit photos, I wore the shawl with The Bishop Wrap. That dress sure loves its shawls!

This look is cute and comfy, and the shawl adds an extra layer of warmth. I’m quite certain this outfit will get loads of wear in the winter. It’s pretty perfect to wear for our weekly quiz. The pub it’s held at is super-cold, so the seed stitch shawl will sure come in handy.

You might remember that The Bishop Wrap is quite revealing. It has a generous neckline that might not be suitable for every occasion. To tone it down and make it a bit more modest, I wore a Spaghetti Strap Top under it. Blue lace peeks out beautifully from under the dress, and gives it not only a cute detail, but also more coverage.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my seed stitch shawl! Be sure to join us on Friday for another outfit post.

Until then!

Love,

Heather

Dress Make-Over

Once upon a time, I had a dress that had never felt quite right, and a top that just didn’t work. I made the dress a while back, felt displeased, and modded it a bit. It still didn’t feel right, so it got buried in my wardrobe.

The top I got as a souvenir from Mom a long, long time ago. That was back when she still tried to understand what I like. Sadly, she forgot that I’m horrified of spiders.

A few weeks ago, I found both the top and the dress, and asked them whether they’d like to get tossed, or play nice together.

The answer was obvious. Dress make-over!

I liked the shape of the top along with its mesh sleeves. The dress had a nice hem, so I decided to combine them. This way, I’d get to make the best of both item’s good qualities.

I started by taking out my scissors. I got these from my ex-mother-in-law (she didn’t die or anything, I just got divorced) a few years ago. I’m not really into the Moomin-thing, but Fiskars makes the kind of scissors I love. They’re durable, easy to sharpen, and comfortable to use.

The scissors are available on amazon in case you’re into Moomin characters. If you get them through the link below, I might earn a little extra.
Moomin Stainless Steel Moominmamma Scissors

I cut the dress at the waist so that I could use all of the hem. I ended up shortening it a bit, though. I like hems to fall mid-thigh, knee, or all the way to the floor, and this one ended up in the gray area of “below the knee”, commonly known as eww in my world.

I also cut the top at the waist. I like waistlines to sit at the narrowest part of the waist. Through this procedure, I gained a bit of cobweb-print material. I used it cut out basic cuffs to replace the ragged ruffles at the sleeves.

I like those, basically, in this top they were just too small and a bit sad.

I serged the pieces together at the waist, installed cuffs, and voila! Two not-so-happy garments turned into a cute dress!

I really like giving sad clothes make-overs, and this trick is among my favorites. Combining a top with a hem to gain a dress is quick, easy, and rewarding. This dress make-over resulted in a comfy and cute dress with just a bit of edge. I might show this to Mom someday to see whether she remembers the top she gave me, or just serve me the good old “dear lord, what on earth are you wearing”-shriek.

With a seam at the waist, this dress needs a belt to ease out the contrast created by two different kinds of fabric. I like to wear this with an elastic belt, a tight petticoat (the hem flies a bit and it makes me uncomfortable), and small, sparkly bits of jewelry. This dress is basic enough to wear for running errands, and still cute enough to style up for a Friday-night outing.

I hope you’ve enjoyed my dress make-over!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

How To Make a Crinkle Skirt

A few weeks ago, Mom brought me a pile of fabrics. She needed a new top or two, and naturally turned to me. In addition to the materials she wanted me to use for the tops, she brought me a present. Crinckle fabric. The material wanted to be a skirt, and so I decided to show you how to make a crinkle skirt.

Now I haven’t seen this material since the crinckle skirt was a big hit back in the year I-forget. I didn’t expect to run into it again, but there it was, demanding attention. This fabric is making a comeback, so I wanted to make a tutorial on how to turn it into a skirt. You can make blouses and jackets and all sorts of thing with this material, but I would stick to simple designs. This stuff is difficult to cut, and the pleats can throw off a fitted garment’s shape. We’re going to keep it simple, and make a skirt with two straight pieces.

How To Make a Crinkle Skirt

A skirt made with just two rectangular pieces is the simplest skirt design known to man. It requires a certain kind of material to look its best. Pleated and crinckled fabrics work best for this style.

You will need

 -Two lengths + 6″ of 50″ wide crinkle fabric if the crinkle is vertical.

I dug around, and found a fabric very similar to the one I used. It’s available in glittery black and a lovely dusky pink. Both of these fabrics are sold by Tia Knight’s fabric store in UK. I’ve ordered fabrics from them both on their actual site and eBay on several occasions, and totally recommend them.

– 2″ wide elastic band

– 8″ long zipper

– sewing machine (serger optional)

– notions you like to use when sewing

how to make a crinkle skirt - material

Start by measuring the desired length of your skirt. I chose to make a knee-length skirt that sits on my waist, so I measured the distance between waist and knee. That came to 55 cm, allowance included.

We’ll want the crinkle pattern to be vertical.

Cut two straight pieces to the desired length.

how to make a crinkle skirt - cutting

With right sides facing, sew one side seam. Serge through raw edges.

I used my serger for sewing, but a sewing machine will be just as good.

how to make a crinkle skirt - sewing

Install a zipper to the other side seam. This tutorial will help you along!

how to make a crinkle skirt - installing zipper

We’ll want the waist to be both tight and elastic. The finished skirt will be heavy, and it needs to sit securely at the waist.

Cut a strip of fabric a bit longer than your waist and wide enough to house your elastic band. Don’t forget to add allowance!

Pin the waistband to the inside of the skirt with right side facing the wrong side of the skirt’s waist. Gather all of the fabric to the waist band. The crinkle of the material will come to aid with this step. Though there seems to be an abundance of material, it will all fit onto the waistband.

Sew the waistband to place.

how to make a crinkle skirt - installing waistband

Take your elastic band, and place it in between the waistband and the seam. Secure both ends to the waistband, fold the waistband over the elastic, and tuck in the raw edge. Top stitch to place while carefully stretching the elastic to length. Top stitch the upper edge of the waist band to keep the elastic from turning inside.

how to make a crinkle skirt - finished waistband

Hem the crinkle skirt, and you’re all done!

how to make a crinkle skirt - hemming

I really love the way the skirt turned out. It’s cute, it’s wide, and despite the huge amount of fabric piled onto the waist, it has quite a narrow silhouette. The material is nice and lively, and the simple style goes with almost anything.

How To Make A Crinkle Skirt - All Done!

I hope you’ve enjoyed this little tutorial on how to make a crinkle skirt! On Friday, I’ll show you a few ways to style this cute crinkle skirt.

Until then.

Love,

Heather