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Black Skater Dress

This week has been about skater dresses, and the various forms they come in. Our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern is this week’s VIP-offer, and today, I wanted to show you guys a dress I made with the help of the pattern.

Our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern comes with three choices. You can choose from a basic skater dress, a Gothic version of the classic, or a heavily modded version that’s based on a store bought blouse. I made my dress along the last option.

I had a short peasant skirt. I liked the look of it, but it felt uncomfortable. I liked to wear it with blouses, and the waist of the skirt never really co-operated with me. It was always either riding up or sagging even though it was the right size. I was quite upset with the skirt. This week, I decided to Do Something to it.

I had a basic black blouse I kinda didn’t like either. It was a bit on the baggy side, and a bit plain. I took the two, and paired them up.

The Skater Dress Pattern offers more detailed instructions on how to do this.

I cut the top to length, joined the two at the waist, and added a zipper on the side. The result is quite nice. The top lost its bagginess, and the skirt its desire to venture out of place.

Black skater dress mod

A dress like this can work as is. All it really needs are tights and shoes. I wanted to add a little something to it, though.

Skater Dress with Silver Accessories

Two weeks or so ago, I happened upon H&Ms sale online. I’ve kinda been on the lookout for new shoes, so when I found a pair of silver pumps at H&M, I ordered them. I picked them up yesterday, and wanted to incorporate them into an outfit right away. I paired the shoes with my new black skater dress mod, my heart buckle belt, and a lace petticoat. This dress has a wide hem, and though the petticoat is a bit flimsy, it offers coverage during the inevitable Marilyn-moments.

Skater Dress and accessories

I added black pearls to the outfit along with large silver hoops.

This is another outfit that works well for casual dinners or going out for a pint. It’s comfy, cute, and easy to wear. Adding a cropped cardigan on top will offer extra warmth, and a silver purse would give the outfit more bling.

Black skater dress with silver accessories

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Skater Dress mod!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Black and White Dress

On Friday, I showed you a skater dress mod I made a while back. The Black and White Dress is made with an elastic bodice and a non-elastic hem. This goes against many sewing laws, but the result is both cute and comfy. The dress is loosely based on our Skater Dress Sewing Pattern.

I had a top that was too short, and a circle skirt that was too long. The top was a basic jersey top made by, as you can see, Link. I kinda liked it, but pairing a crop top with anything is really difficult for me. So I decided to add a hem to the top.

I took the circle skirt, and cut off the excess length at the waist. This made the skirt’s waist large enough for me to easily pass through. Then I ruched the waist, and serged to the hem of the top. The process so far took less than 45 minutes.

After I’d completed the merger, I found that the newly born dress needed something. I had a bit of fabric left from shortening the skirt. I decided to use it for cuffs. My original plan was to just combine the top and the skirt. Adding cuffs was a spontaneous idea I just ran with.

I sewed rectangle pieces to the tops sleeves, and top stitched them to give them a finished look. The waist of the dress is elastic because I used the elastic stitch and gathered the fabric. The cuffs however do not give one bit, so if you do this, keep in mind that pairing elastic and non-elastic materials will eat away the stretch! Measuring is also important: a cuff too tight will make the entire dress feel uncomfortable.

The cuffs looked really nice, and I made another snap-decision to give the dress a bit more colour. I cut a collar out of the remaining bits of fabric, and sewed it to the neckline. To keep the ends of the collar from flapping about, I hand-stitched them down.

The cuffs and collar tie the hem and bodice together, and give the dress a polished look. The waist is a bit loose because the skirt has quite a lot of fabric, but accessories fix that problem. An elastic belt or a corset hide the seam, and give the dress another detail.

For the photos, I paired the black and white dress with our Reversible Waist Corset and black pearls. To give the hem a bit more volume, I wore two petticoats under it. These are needed for other reasons, too, because…

… the dress flies.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Black and White Dress!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Two SkaterDress Looks

On Wednesday, I featured my velvet print corselet. Today, I’m shifting from corsets to next week’s theme which is… skater dresses!

I for one really like the basic idea behind the skater dress. A fitted bodice paired with a short, wide hem is super-easy to mix and match, and pretty perfect for all sorts of casual occasions. I wouldn’t wear these dresses to a wedding, but definitely for a dinner with friends or family, or a to a fun day of shopping.

These two outfits are based on a skater dress mod I will be featuring more closely in next week’s I Made This! -post.

Are The Eighties Back Again!

Well, for a Goth, the eighties never left. I thoroughly love the frill and femininity of that era, and like to incorporate it to outfits whenever I can. Long necklaces and hats were a big thing back then, and I enjoy both.

For this look, I paired my velvet print corselet with a skater dress made in two colours, and a poofy petticoat. I accessorized the outfit with black pearls and a bowler hat.

Black and Red Skater Dress with an eighties-vibe

The black and red dress is made to resemble a skater dress. It has a fitted bodice made with cotton jersey, and a wide, two layer hem. Both elements are trimmed with lace. The hem of the dress is non-elastic, which breaks most rules of sewing. This is why I will be returning to the dress in next week’s posts.

I like the way the corselet ties the colours of the dress together, again offering a soft fade-out in between. The outfit is also really comfy, too, thanks to the elasticity of the materials.

Black and Red Skater Dress paired with velvet print corselet

 Black and White

The second dress is made with the same principle, an elastic bodice paired with a non-elastic hem. The hem of this dress is a full circle. The hem has a wide ruffle, and it flies like crazy. This is why I always wear a tight, knee-length skirt with this dress! Marilyn-moments are lovely, but I don’t want the whole town seeing my knickers.

I made this dress with a collar and cuffs to match the hem. This solution ties the colours together in a subtle way. The waist does appear a bit harsh, though, since it has a seam. I like to hide it with a belt. An elastic belt adds a cute detail to the dress, and feels comfortable.

Black and White Skater Dress

I paired this black and white skater dress with my bloodstone rings and pendant. This particular stone dyes the water red while it’s ground into shape. It seems to be crying tears of blood then, which is why it’s called the bloodstone.

I can’t remember where I got these, but both the pendant and the rings are fully made of stone. If you drop them, they break. They’re pretty, though, and look nice with black and white outfits.

The style of this dress kinda reminds me of the fifties. I’m pretty much as far from a rockabella as a girl can be, but I do love the way ladies dressed in the fifties. Hems were wide, hair was high, and every detail was oh so pretty.

I kinda wish fashion was still like that, pretty and controlled. I may be getting old because the yoga pants -style of today sort of gives me a headache. It’s a good thing we all can dress the way we want, and just look the other way if something doesn’t please us.

Black and White Skater Dress with collar and cuffs

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my skater dresses!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

PS: don’t forget to join our mailing list to gain access to VIP-offers! Next week, The Skater Dress Pattern is going on sale!

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Velvet Print Corselet

Last time, I promised to show you the corselet featured in Friday’s post on Tuesday. Well, as we all know, life sometimes gets in the way of things. I was running all sorts of errands yesterday, and had to push this week’s first post forward a bit. But as promised, I’m still featuring the velvet print corselet!

This corselet is made with our Embroidered Corselet Pattern. The shape of the pieces is exactly the same, but I did make some modifications to the original pattern. Instead of embroidering the garment, I used a velvet printed fabric for this corselet. The material is elastic, and the print both looks and feels cool. I used the same fabric for binding and bone channels. A contrast colour might have made the end result too busy.

I also added a lace up back to the original style. This is a simple mod: instead of cutting the back piece on fold, cut it in two pieces. Use fusible interfacing to stabilize the edges, sew facings on them, and add eyelets. This makes the corselet look and feel a bit different, and allows it to be altered in size. Elastic garments rarely need to be let out, but it’s still a nice option.

I like to wear these kinds of corsets and corselets with dresses. This style doesn’t have a modesty panel, so it leaves the back partly exposed. It’s difficult to get a skirt waist to remain neatly in place. Dresses are easier in that sense. They offer full coverage, and don’t require tugging or adjusting.

For the photos, I paired my velvet print corselet with our Hooded Dress. The style is made with two layers of light jersey, and can be made with or without a hood. I prefer the hoodless style myself. I have a lot of hair, and it never co-operates with hoods. The basic style of the dress pleases me quite well, though. So much actually that I’ve made another one. I’ll feature that version in an upcoming Everyday With an Edge -post, so do stay tuned!

The Hooded Dress works really well with corset and corselets. It has flowing lines, and the waist sits a bit higher. To give the dress more shape, I wear it with belts and corsets. The reverse puff-sleeve, or bishop’s sleeve, gives the dress a soft, feminine feel. Made with a full length hem, this dress would bear a very Victorian vibe.

A two layer hem paired with a corselet offers a chance to drape the hem. For the photos, I tucked the top layer of the front hem under the corselet’s waist. This creates a draped detail to the hem, and alters the look of the dress in a subtle way. In a fully black dress this trick isn’t too noticeable. Making the dress in two colours and draping the hem creates a more striking effect.

Don’t forget that The Embroidered Corselet is this week’s VIP-offer! Join our mailing list to gain access to special offers.

Next time, we’ll continue with the velvet print corselet. In Friday’s post I’ll also be revealing our theme for the next two weeks!

Until then.

Love,

Heather

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Elastic Corselet

On Tuesday, I showed you a crochet skirt I made while back. The skirt, being quite red, needed another garment to soften the break to black, so I paired it with my Embroidered Corselet. I’ve blogged about it before, but today I wanted to write a fresh post on the soft, elastic corselet.

elastic waist corselet, image one

The Embroidered Corselet is one of our first products. It was published back in 2014, I think. When the product was first launched, I managed to anger a few hardcore corset fans with it. I failed to emphasize enough that this product is not meant to be a real corset. It’s elastic, it’s comfy, and it’s the only similarity it bears to corsets is the shape of the pattern. Made with elastic fabrics and without a lacing, this corselets serves its purpose as a wide belt.

The incident is long gone and forgotten, but it still bugs me sometimes. Steel boned, unyielding corsets are lovely to look at, but often uncomfortable to wear. Choosing what to wear under a corset is serious business: a button or a zipper in the wrong place can leave a painful mark on the skin. I for one love corsets, but sometimes it’s nice to wear something softer.

The Embroidered Corselet was born out of that desire. Made with a corset pattern but with stretchy fabric, it’s comfortable and easy to wear.

Since the original version is quite red, I’ve made another one with the same pattern. I made a minor modification to it, though. To bring in a bit more of the corsetry-feel, I added a lacing to the back of it, and changed to my trade-mark criss-cross buttoning.

The fabric is a thick poly-blend with elastane knit into it. Back in the year I-forget, I got to make my friend a dress from the fabric. She let me have what was left over, and I used the scraps to create an elastic corselet. I thoroughly love the red and orange splatters on the fabric! Since the corselet has many shades of red, it goes with most of my red accessories. I especially like the way it matches with my Tropical Breeze Shawl. For this outfit, I paired the corselet and the shawl with an upcoming dress pattern. I’m hoping to get it published soon so stay tuned! I’m also planning to feature the corselet in Tuesday’s I Made This! -post along with a few outfit ideas based on it. 

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about The Embroidered Corselet.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Red Crochet Skirt

Once upon a time, I decided to want a red crochet skirt. This happened before I made the black dress I showed you a while back. For this skirt, I used the same lace repeat. I really like this lace, it’s easy to hook, and lovely to look at. The repeat is only three rows high, so it’s also easy to memorize.

I crocheted the skirt with Novita’s long-gone Kotiväki. It’s a pretty basic mercerized cotton suitable for hook sizes 2,5mm to 3,5mm. I like working with larger hooks, so I liked the yarn. The consistency pleased me as well. I like natural fibers, and cotton works nice with lace. It also gives crochet projects really pretty stitch definition.

Finding a substitute for Kotiväki has proven surprisingly difficult. Fingering weight blends are numerous, but cotton is harder to come by. I guess I’ll have to settle for blends in the future.

Red Crochet Skirt Detail

I wanted my skirt to be tight, but not too tight to walk in. I wanted it long and narrow and fitted at the hip.

Achieving this was easier than I thought. I started at the waist with a 2,5mm hook and worked my way down upping hook size twice. This made the skirt widen without increases. When the skirt reached my knees, I changed to hook size 4mm, and worked the rest of the hem.

I like the way the skirt turned out. It doesn’t have a lining because I want to wear it with both short and long underskirts. Versatility is important to me, and this skirt provides it.

Crochet Skirt over Bodycon Dress

Crochet garments, especially lacey ones, are light and see-through. Petticoats are in order when wearing a lace skirt. For this outfit, I paired the red crochet skirt with The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress. Worn under the skirt, the dress provides coverage. It also doubles as a top.

To cover up the waist of the skirt, I wore The Embroidered Waist Corselet. This light-weight corselet is made with elastic material, and features buttons at the front, and light embroidery on the sides. Contrast coloured bone channels continue the red hem a bit higher, and make it blend into the top without a clear line. I like to do this when wearing colours. Combining two colours that are quite far from each other, it feels nice to bind them together with another garment. A hard break of colour in any outfit can seem a bit harsh.

Wearing a dress under a skirt comes with one more bonus feature: you won’t have a shirt tail to worry about.

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my red crochet skirt!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Two Styles for Pretty Basic Jersey Dress

On Tuesday, I promised to share outfit ideas based on The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress. I’ve decided one post isn’t enough, so more will come next week!  Playing models is loads of fun so I’ve ended up with too much ideas for just one post.

As you may have noticed, this post is the first in a new category called Everyday With an Edge. Posts under this label will focus on outfits and styling while featuring one or four of our designs. I hope you’ll like them!

LBD with Heart-Buckle Belt

The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress is my favourite thing to mix and match. It’s a clean slate, which makes it super-easy to style. The best part about this little black dress is that it doesn’t really need much.

I chose to pair the dress with basic black tights and a belt. The belt’s made with elastic lace and a heart-shaped buckle. The belt’s really cute, and adds a feminine touch to any outfit. Paired with a basic dress it accentuates the waist, and gives a bit more structure to the style.

The belt would have looked nice on its own, but I wanted to add more silver to the outfit. I wore a heavy wrist-band, lots of narrow rings, and my scissor-necklace.

Every time I wear the scissors, someone cracks the “oh, it’s because you sew” -joke. Old as it is, I always laugh politely.

When wearing necklaces, I like to pull my hair up. This way, it doesn’t cover the necklace.

Draped Red Dress

When I was little, I used to love trying on Mom’s jewellery. She had one ring that was overwhelmingly beautiful to an eight-year-old me.

Mom noticed, naturally, how much I loved the ring, and ten years later, she gave it to me. The ring still is as lovely to me as it was so many years ago. I wanted to build this outfit around the ring.

The ring is from the sixties, and goes pretty well with a brooch I have. As dresses were super-short in the sixties, I chose to use the brooch to shorten the hem of the red dress with.

Doing this is really simple: gather the hem up in folds, and secure to place with a brooch. This creates an asymmetrical shape, and can be used as an effect on both short and long hems.

To avoid showing too much leg, I wore a black skirt under the dress.

The outfit needed a bit more black, so I popped on my Reversible Waist Corset‘s black side. I topped the style with red pumps that match the dress.

Both of these outfits are ideal for shopping or casual dinners. They’re cute, comfy, and bear a bit of unique edge.

I hope you’ve enjoyed the first Everyday With an Edge -post!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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