Heather’s Basic Blazer

Filet crochet is one of my favorite crochet techniques. It’s easy, quick to master, and lovely to look at. Its versatility never ceases to amaze me. Filet crochet can be used for curtains, table runners, accessories, and many kinds of garments. I chose it to feature in my crochet cardigan called Heather’s Basic Blazer.

I like pieces of clothing that are easy to mix and match. Especially cardigans should work with everything in your closet. This basic style works wonders with skirts and dresses, and compliments looks built around trousers. The only thing that can clash with this cardigan is its color. I’ve sorted out that problem by making two: one in basic black, and one in petrol blue. The blue version is actually made with a combination of two yarns. A light, upcycled acrylic in petrol blue, and a satin finished black yarn also upcycled. The combo of two textures and colors gave the blazer a unique finish, and made the blue cardigan decadently heavy. I’ve often heard that one shouldn’t mix different weights and finishes, but I think it’s a way to add detail to a basic garment. As long as the yarns can both be washed in the same temperature, it’s OK to go nuts. I recommend playing around with yarns. After all, crocheting should be fun and rewarding.

The black version is made with basic cotton. I chose to use upcycled materials for both black and blue crochet cardigan. You can find a short tute on how to salvage yarn here, but feel free to use freshly bought yarn or something from your stash instead. This crochet cardigan works with any kind of sport weight yarn. As long as the gauge matches, you’re good to go!

Both these cardigans have quickly become my absolute favourites. They’re easy to pair, comfy to wear, and offer the right amount of warmth to casual outfits. With a sleek shape, they’re even nice to wear under winter coats!

I hope you’ll enjoy the Heather’s Basic Blazer crochet pattern!

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

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Sneak Peaks

I’ve been working on quite a few new designs during the fall. Now, some of them are ready for sneak peaks!

A you may know, I like to create knit and crochet items along with sewn garments. Knitting and crocheting takes a longer time than sewing, so a lot of patience is needed when making patterns. Even a fast knitter takes more than a week to knit up a set of hat and wristlets, and a knit cardigan may take even longer to finish. Rewards are wonderful, though, and I’ve found that knitting and crocheting is a great way to unwind and relax.

A year ago, I finished a cardigan made with two light yarns, both upcycled. The cardigan quickly grew to be my favourite one, and as the nights grew dark again, I decided to turn it into a pattern. The blue cardigan was crocheted using a 5mm hook.

filet crochet cardigan made with two light yarns

The shape and feel of the cardigan appealed to me. As I’d chosen two yarns, it turned out decadently heavy.

For a fresh version to be written out as a pattern, I chose an upcycled cotton yarn, and a size 4mm hook. The cardigan is quick to make, but I lost interest in it five times in the process. As photoshoot-day crept closer, I decided to push the cardigan out. I finished it just three hours before it was time to take pictures! Trying it on for the first time after fully finishing it was nerve-wrecking, but the black cardigan proved pretty much perfect.

black filet crochet cardigan made with upcycled cotton yarn

Last for today, is a versatile set of hat and fingerless gloves. The hat and mitts are both knit with a glittery yarn, and feature seed stitch and cables. They both can be worn in two ways. Though I finished the set more than a year ago, it’s taken long to finish the process. I’m happy to let you know that the NightSky Set will be published just as soon as I put some finishing touches into the pattern.

I hope you’ll enjoy these upcoming designs!

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

Set of hat and fingerless gloves featuring seed stitch and cables

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Elise Shawl

Once upon a time, I found a violet cotton cardigan from a flea market. I liked the colour, and I liked the feel of the knit, so I bought it and took it home.
I do this a lot, buy a knit from wherever, give it a good wash, and unravel it for yarn. It’s a cheap way to get loads of yarn, but it does take a bit of effort. I’m going to write a tutorial on how to upcycle sweaters for yarn, but today, I’m just going to flaunt something I made.
Two years ago I got a bit of a Christmas-panic. I had five nights to go, and no present for Mom. So I got some red wool blend, and rummaged through Ravelry for something quick and lovely.
What I happened upon was Evan Plevinski’s Elise Shawl. It’s a beautiful, airy shawl which can be made in any size. Mom’s shawl ate 200 grams of yarn, and took three nights to make.
Later, I decided to want one for myself. So I took my violet cotton, and set to work.
The lace pattern is easy and consists of just two rows. It’s quick to memorize, so this shawl is a pretty perfect watching TV -project.
I had an entire cardigan’s worth of yarn, and I used it all for my Elise. It turned out pretty big, and a good blocking would increase it size even further. It’s just that I tend to wear this a lot, and can’t be bothered to block it after each wash…
Shawls are lovely, but they tend to be a bit tricky to wear. To force mine stay put, I crocheted a flower from the little yarn I had left over.
Behind the flower, I sewed a button. I use this to close my Elise so it won’t fall off when I see something shiny and get all exited.
 Made from cotton, this is a perfect summer shawl. It’s light, it breathes, and it still provides warmth when I need it.
 And it’s big! Of course, I’m tiny, but still that’s a lot of shawl.
 I’m very happy about the way the finished shawl came out, and I really like the Elise pattern.
A shawl can be worn in many ways, but we often forget that it can work as a skirt. It complements gypsy-inspired outfits, and doubles as a hip scarf for belly dancing. Scarves and shawls are very versatile, so don’t forget to take advantage of their full potential.
Until next Wednesday.
Love,
Heather
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Let’s Make… Granny Square to Cardigan

Once upon a time I found a black cotton sweater from a flea market. I made sure it wasn’t serged together, bought it, and asked it what it wanted to be.
It proudly claimed to want to be a granny square.
I hardly ever say no to fabrics and yarn, so I started a granny square.
 By the time I’d reached row six, the former sweater said it actually really wanted to be a cardigan.
Fine, I said, and added armholes on row nine.
The yarn was happy, and I crocheted along for seven evenings.
The process turned into a free pattern, and…
 … a humongous cardigan.
 This is pretty much a square with sleeves you can wrap around yourself any way you like.
 I added a shell edge to my black version a while back to give it a more decadent look.
 With a tall enough collar, the edge doubles as a hood. Which is really nice during the winter when it’s cold-cold-cold.
Naturally, I wanted another one. This time, I found a red sweater that wanted to be something else. The yarn was a bit thicker, and the finished cardigan is stiffer and less flowing than the black one. Also, it came out a bit small.
 It works well with the collar down, and it nice and warm.
But if I flip it upside down…
 … I get a shorter hem and a large hood!
These cardigans are versatile, comfortable, and warm. They’re like a portable safety blanket with a purpose.
 The pattern is available for free on Ravelry, Craftsy, and heatherwielding.com. I hope you enjoy it!
Until next Wednesday.
Love,
Heather

 

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