Lune

Lune is a knitting pattern for a striped, crescent scarf. It’s worked in garter stitch, and has a narrow crochet border. Lune is unisex, and entirely beginner-friendly. Lune can be modded in size to work as a scarf or a shawl.

Lune is a knitting pattern for a crescent shawl

I didn’t really plan for Lune to happen. After working on The Lovelace Gloves, I wanted to knit something very simple on large needles. In a way, Lune was a comfort-knit. As rewarding it is to create something very intricate, a fast-paced project that requires very little concentration is just and only pure fun.

For me, Lune was fun to knit. The feel of the yarns was nice and fluffy, large needles made the project come together in very little time, and not having to purl or read a chart was relaxing for a change.

Lune was born on a whim. I went through my stash, and found two balls of mystery yarn in black and green. The color-combo brought Loki to my mind. I immediately knew I wanted to use the yarns on scarf, as long as possible, and easy to mix and match.

The shape of the scarf was also quickly decided. I wanted to find the easiest possible way to create a crescent scarf in order to make the pattern as beginner-friendly as possible.

I set to work, and decided Lune needed a little something-something to make it special.

Garter stitch stays flat without ribbed edges. It’s ideal for scarfs and shawls: it looks nice, has a lot of elasticity, and stays put on its own. I chose to finish Lune with a narrow crochet edge not for practical reasons, but to give it a unique look.

Working on Lune was an absolute pleasure. I enjoyed every moment of it so much I’m actually thinking about casting on another one in black and purple.

I hope you’ll love The Lune Knitting Pattern, too!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

PS. If you haven’t already, be sure to join our mailing list. I’ll be featuring one product each week, and offering a special discount on it for all VIPs!

Black and Blue Gloves

After creating The Pretty Basic Blazer pattern, I had some yarn left over. There wasn’t enough for a top or a skirt, but still too much for just a pair of short fingerless gloves. As fall was drawing near, I decided to use the yarn for a pair of black and blue gloves.

The yarn I used for The Basic Blazer was a combination of two threads. I took a ball of black, super-slippery polyester, and a ball of petrol-blue acrylic. Together, they formed a two-toned yarn thick enough to work with a larger hook. As I worked the blazer, the tones intertwined with each other, creating an interesting surface. The blazer is crocheted, but I wanted to see how the two yarns would work together in knit.

I didn’t want to cast on a huge project, and there was a limited amount of yarn, so I chose to cast on cabled gloves. This style is actually a pre-version of the upcoming sister-patterns called Lovelace and Purlace.

I chose a classic cable pattern for the back of the gloves, and worked an Indian thumb gusset to them. The yarn behaved beautifully, turning and twisting with stitches, giving me some that seemed blue, some that seemed black, and some that showed off both colors. As the cable pattern is pretty simple, it didn’t clash with the two-toned yarn.

The cuffs of the gloves are pretty long. I get cold easily, and winter coats often have sleeves that are just a little bit too short. Longer gloves keep my wrists warm even when it’s really cold outside.

Here in Finland, it’s often really cold outside, so I’m glad I chose to work a longer cuff.

The body of the gloves along with fingers are worked in basic stockinette. After finishing the gloves, I started thinking.

Gloves are meant to be tight, and stockinette leaves a rough surface on the inside. The idea of reverse stockinette gloves was born from that little inconvenience.

The cable on the inside of the wrist also gave me an idea.

The palm of a glove is often left plain. I don’t see a reason of functionality to that, so with Lovelace, I carried a cable through the thumb gusset. I kinda regret not doing that with the black and blues as well, but I’m still happy with my cabled, two-toned gloves.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Black and Blue Gloves!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Hitched Hems

Dresses are my favorite things to wear. They’re easy to mix and match, and never out of place. Styles to choose from are endless, and materials used vary from cotton to velvet to leather. Personally, I like dresses that are both versatile and classic. One of my favorite designs in our collection is The Princess and Keyhole Dress. It features puff-sleeves, a keyhole neck, and hitched hems.

princess-seamed dress, one

The Princess and Keyhole Dress is best made with non-elastic materials such as cotton. The dress has princess seams, so it’s shaped at the bodice, and a wide hem. Puff-sleeves make it comfy to wear, but the key element is the hem.

The dress is made with channels on the hem’s seams. With ribbons slid into the channels, the hem can be modified in both length and shape. The dress can be worn long, pulled up at the front, or gathered into a short version. I like to use the ribbons to shorten the hem at the front to show off a colorful peticoat.

The shape of the dress finds its origin in the Victorian era, when hems were wide, ruffled, and often gathered. I’ve used the element of hitched hems in an earlier design as well.

princess-seamed dress, four

The Victorian Skirt is made with two layers. The botton layer features a wide ruffle, and the upper layer can be hitched up with ribbons. The Victorian Skirt is made with a very simple pattern, so it’s available as a drafting tutorial only. This allows everyone to create a skirt with their own, unique measurements.
Hitched hems are an easy way to create a versatile dress. The Victorian Skirt can be worn with both layers smooth and long, pulled up evenly, gathered at the front, or even arranged into a bustle-like shape. I like to wear mine gathered evenly, and I’ve even made a version with ribbon channels on both layers of the skirt.

black satin skirt, Victorian style

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about our Hitched Hems -sewing patterns.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Black and White Gloves

Every autumn, I decide to need a new pair of basic gloves. I usually only wear black ones though I’ve made a pair in red, another in black and blue, and one in sunny yellow. The latest finished ones are black and white gloves.

I used a basic glove pattern I have memorized for these ones. The gloves have an Indian thumb gusset, which is one of my favorite techniques. The gusset is super-easy to work, and since it follows the shape of the palm, it makes gloves really comfy to wear. I’ve incorporated the Indian thumb gusset into one pattern I’ve made. The What to do With the Rest Mitts is a free pattern for fingerless gloves, and it can be found here on Ravelry, and here in our own store.

Looking around the internet, I noted that knitting pattern for basic gloves are relatively scarce. Harry Wells has written a free pattern, which can be found on Ravelry, but it features a different kind of thumb gusset. The pattern’s quite good, though, and I highly recommend it.

To spruce up my basic gloves, I decided to make them stripy. I had black and white yarns stashed, and though I know the white will turn gray pretty soon, I chose to risk it. Neutral colors won’t clash with anything, so if I’m feeling very adventurous, I might pair the gloves with an outfit splashed with red or purple.

The hand of the gloves is worked with single-row stripes. On the cuffs, I went with wider rows. This way, the gloves have a bit more going on. Thinner and wider stripes create an interesting surface even when worked with only two tones.

After finishing the gloves, I still had some yarn left. In order to get rid of some of it, I crocheted six small flowers. I sewed them onto the gloves, three on each, and found myself very happy with the choice.

Gloves are often left plain, mainly because heavy embellishments tend to get caught on sleeves and bags and passers-by. Light decorations, though, are sometimes a nice way to give a little more oomph to gloves and mittens.

I hope you enjoyed reading about my Black and White Gloves!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Pink Cthulhu

For me, Tuesday was one of those days when you’re feeling a bit under the weather. To lift my spirits, I went through my stash to find a cute yarn to crochet something quick and easy with, I came out with pink cotton, and decided I wanted to make another Cthulhu to keep company to the green one I’d made before.

I know these guys are usually green, but who knows, maybe this Elder God happened upon a mysterious mutation of Upgrade Cuteness Level to the Max.

Amigurumis are still an area not-that-well-known to me. I know the basics, naturally, but still need patterns in order to work a design with more details.

Early last year, I crocheted a green Cthulhu with the help of Rural Rebellion’s pattern. As I searched for it today, I noted that their website had been taken down. After a bit of searching, I found the pattern I’d used before. It can be found here, but I don’t know if the link will be live for long.

I really like the pattern, it’s well-written and clear, and I sincerely hope the website will be renewed soon.

For the pink Cthulhu, I used two strands of pink upcycled cotton. It’s a really light shade of pink which reminds me of cotton candy. The tone is pretty, but when I try to imagine the yarn as a garment, something hurts and says NO. For amigurumis, though, it’s pretty perfect.

I cast the Cthulhu on at around 1pm, and cast off at around 9pm. I took breaks to do a bit of work and to say bye to the better half who went off on a business trip, and to cook dinner for myself. Working on the Cthulhu took, to my reckoning, about five hours.

The finished product created using a 5mm (US8) hook is about 13 cm high. The Cthulhu has curling tentacles, which were really fun to work with, and wings attached to its back.

For the eyes, I used black plastic buttons. I sewed them on while working on the head, so I could still easily reach the inside of the work.

I really like the way the Pink Cthulhu turned out. Though the color is a bit unconventional. I think it adds to the original design’s chubby cuteness.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Pink Cthulhu!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

SneakPeaks and Mailing List News

It’s new year, and I truly hope yours got off to a better start than mine. We had a bit of a disaster with our website, had to resort to a backup which dated to last July, and lost all blog post from the past six months in the process. Things could be a lot worse, though, so I shall take this as an opportunity to grow and learn.

Learn to update backups every once and again, that is.

To kick-off the new year (a bit late), we are launching a newsletter. Starting on Feb 3rd, if the sky doesn’t fall on us, we’ll be sending out weekly notes including news on our current mishaps going-ons, and info and special offers on fresh products. Our blog will be following along the lines of our newsletter, but by joining our mailing list, you’ll have access to discount codes and other offers. In other words, by ordering our newsletter, you’ll be making yourself a VIP.

Upon joining, you’ll also receive a little present: a discount code to be used here at heatherwielding.com. The coupon will get you 20% off on one product of your choosing, and you can spend it anytime. The coupon won’t expire, so feel free to save it for later.

You can join up here, or by filling out the box on the sidebar.

During the next few weeks, I hope, we’ll be launching new products as well. A super-easy, super-cute jersey dress will probably be first. I’m thinking about creating more dress styles with viscose jersey, just because they’re so easy and comfy to wear. These will most likely become a part of our Pretty Basic styles.

We also have a knitting pattern on the way. The pattern needs proof-reading, and it will be sent out to be tested soon. Naming the pattern took a long, long time, and I only came up with the name three nights ago. These intricate gloves are called Lovelace. They will soon be followed by a sister-pattern called Purlace.

I’ve also been working on something a bit more challenging. I had a bit of red wool fabric stashed, and a bit of lace, and together, they wanted to be…

Well, I’ll tell you more about that later.

I hope you all have had a lovely beginning of the year.

Until next time!

Love,

Heather

Fishnet Top

Red, upcycled cotton wanted desperately to be a sweater, something light, airy, and darkly inclined. After a few moments of contemplation, I turned it into a mesh top. Naturally, the process resulted in the Fishnet Top Knitting Pattern.

Fishnet Top Knitting Pattern can be made with any yarn as long as the gauge matches

Following along the lines of our previously published Fishnet Gloves Knitting Pattern, this pattern is androgynous and completely beginner-friendly. In my opinion, the world lacks in basic knitting patterns suitable for those just starting with the wonderful craft. I like to offer simple patterns as well to help those still increasing their knitting skills. This pattern is worked in straight lines, in the round, and is made with easy, repetitive stitch patterns.

The Fishnet Top Knitting Pattern includes sizes XS-L along with an option for a version made with ribbed neckline, hem, and cuffs. The sweater has a low, scooped neckline which makes it both trendy and comfortable to wear. The hem can be knit to any length: it can be made long, or left at a cropped line. The sleeve length is also entirely optional. The model sweater is made with long sleeves, but a short sleeved version works as well.

The model sweater is knit with upcycled cotton. This yarn choice makes the style cool for the summer. The Fishnet Top Knitting Pattern can be worked with any yarn as long as the gauge matches. It can be made with cotton, wool blend, or even acrylic. Try self-striping or self-patterning yarns for an even funkier look!

Fishnet Top Knitting Pattern is worked without increases

Since the fishnet sweater is simple, it can be worn with many kinds of outfits which makes it quite versatile. I paired it with a pleated mini, but the sweater also works with jeans and long skirts. It can also be worn over a dress to bring extra warmth to cold nights.

I hope you’ll enjoy our Fishnet Top Knitting Pattern!

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

Fishnet Top Knitting Pattern suits both him and her

Hooded Dress

Super light jerseys can be too thin to be worn on their own. I solved the problem by creating a two-layer dress. Styled with a large hood, our Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern is designed to make everyday wonderful.

Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern comes with a large hood

Our Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern has a wide hem, a fitted bodice, and reverse puff sleeves. Made with two layers of fabric, it can be made monochrome, or with contrasting colors. Using a single tone makes the dress modest and easy to pair with different kinds of accessories. Choosing two colors turns it up a notch, bringing a bit of flare to the simple design.

This style works best when made with light cotton or viscose jerseys, but poly-blends can work as well. Try using a thicker fabric for the shell, and topping it with a see-through chiffon or even lace. Keep in mind, though, that this dress needs to be sewn with elastic fabrics in order to make it as comfy as possible!

Our Hooded Dress has a wide hem, and made with light fabrics, it can have a tendency of flying. It’s a smart idea to pair the dress with a tight petticoat to avoid showing too much. Our Garter Petticoat works wonders with this style, and helps keep overknee-socks up during the winter.

Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern allows you to create a two-layer dress

For this dress, I wanted to take advantage of my favorite sleeve shape. The reverse puff sleeve enjoyed popularity in the sixties, and pops up every now and again. In my opinion, it’s one of the most flattering sleeves. It’s easy to pair with 3/4 cardigans, and works wonderfully with shawls of all shapes. In a feminine dress, it emphasizes the female form.

Our Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern was originally designed to be hooded, but to give it more versatility, we’ve added an alternate neckline to the style so the dress can be made hoodless as well. Don’t forget, with two layers of fabric, you can play with the shape of the hem as much as you like!

I hope you’ll enjoy our Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern.

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern also has a hoodless option

Fishnet Gloves

Once upon a time, I had pretty basic black cotton stashed. I wanted to turn it into something simple, something easy to create. The yarn turned into fingerless gloves, and the process turned into a knitting pattern. Our Fishnet Gloves Knitting Pattern combines fishnet with twisted rib, and is beginner-friendly.

made with cotton, these fishnet gloves are cool to wear during the summer

Knitting and crocheting are fun, productive ways to unwind. Repetive motion allows the mind to calm down, and seeing items created feels rewarding. Personally, I believe there are far too few beginner-level knitting patterns around. Simple projects are quick to master, and the satisfaction gained from being able to make something beautiful is pretty close to the best thing in the world. That’s why I like to offer knitting patterns for beginners as well.

Our Fishnet Gloves Knitting Pattern features elements of Dark fashion. Fishnet armwarmers have been around since the birth of Punk, and still enjoy the love of those darkly inclined. Knit in black, the Fishnet Gloves make the perfect Gothic accessory. In brighter colours, the style can work for more ordinary styles as well. Try self-striping yarn for an interesting, multi-toned look. Yarns with metallic shimmer add a futuristic element to the mix, and soft pastels make gloves that even Lolis can rock.

our fishnet gloves knitting pattern is beginner-friendly

The model gloves are knit to a moderate length. Modifying the length is easy, and you can knit the rib as long or as short as you choose. These gloves are versatile in nature, and can be shaped to a knitter’s whim.

The pattern includes written instructions on how to knit the gloves, along with charts for both rib and fishnet. These gloves come in size Medium, and the pattern has tips on how to adjust the size to fit larger arms. Note, that this pattern can work for both him and her, especially for androgynous styles.

I hope you’ll enjoy our Fishnet Gloves Knitting Pattern!

Until next Wednesday.

Love,

Heather

Fishnet gloves combine elements of dark fashion

Reversible Waist Corset

Once upon a time, I had two cool fabrics that both wanted to be a corset. One was a black cotton-blend with a soft satin finish, and the other a skull-print cotton scarf. After a while of pondering, I decided to take full advantage of both fabrics. The process turned into our Reversible Waist Corset Sewing Pattern, which was published on Craftsy last week.

Reversible Waist Corset Sewing Pattern - skulls on the outside

This reverible corset features a front zipper, and a laced-up back. The zipper makes it easy to put on, which mean you can flip it in the middle of a night out if you so choose. The lacing gives the garment a bit of wiggle-room, making it easy to modify the size a bit. Made with light-weight fabrics, this corset is designed for decorational purposes only. Using thicker materials and flat steel boning makes it possible, though, to wear this style as a tighter laced corset.

Lacing

As this style is reversible, it comes without a modesty panel. Sewing one into a garment meant to be worn inside-out on occation is virtually impossible. This means our reversible corset is best worn with dresses. This way, the garment seen through the lacing is seamless and smooth. When pairing this style with skirts and tops, be sure to make certain the back looks pretty!

SkullCorset

This reversible waist corset sewing pattern comes with a zipper at the front. Attaching it in a tidy way is surprisingly easy. This style does have a bit of hand-stitching involved, though. The binding is best sewn by hand so that both sides of the garment remain pleasing to the eye.

The bone channels are sewn into the seams. They’re visible on one side only, and nearly hidden on the other side. This technique guarantees a tidy finish with quick, easy steps which are fully explained in our illustrated sewing tutorial that you will receive with the pattern.

I hope you’ll enjoy our Reversible Waist Corset Sewing Pattern!

Until next Wedneday.

Love,

Heather

Reversible Waist Corset Sewing Pattern - black satin on the inside