Velvet Print Corselet

Last time, I promised to show you the corselet featured in Friday’s post on Tuesday. Well, as we all know, life sometimes gets in the way of things. I was running all sorts of errands yesterday, and had to push this week’s first post forward a bit. But as promised, I’m still featuring the velvet print corselet!

This corselet is made with our Embroidered Corselet Pattern. The shape of the pieces is exactly the same, but I did make some modifications to the original pattern. Instead of embroidering the garment, I used a velvet printed fabric for this corselet. The material is elastic, and the print both looks and feels cool. I used the same fabric for binding and bone channels. A contrast colour might have made the end result too busy.

I also added a lace up back to the original style. This is a simple mod: instead of cutting the back piece on fold, cut it in two pieces. Use fusible interfacing to stabilize the edges, sew facings on them, and add eyelets. This makes the corselet look and feel a bit different, and allows it to be altered in size. Elastic garments rarely need to be let out, but it’s still a nice option.

I like to wear these kinds of corsets and corselets with dresses. This style doesn’t have a modesty panel, so it leaves the back partly exposed. It’s difficult to get a skirt waist to remain neatly in place. Dresses are easier in that sense. They offer full coverage, and don’t require tugging or adjusting.

For the photos, I paired my velvet print corselet with our Hooded Dress. The style is made with two layers of light jersey, and can be made with or without a hood. I prefer the hoodless style myself. I have a lot of hair, and it never co-operates with hoods. The basic style of the dress pleases me quite well, though. So much actually that I’ve made another one. I’ll feature that version in an upcoming Everyday With an Edge -post, so do stay tuned!

The Hooded Dress works really well with corset and corselets. It has flowing lines, and the waist sits a bit higher. To give the dress more shape, I wear it with belts and corsets. The reverse puff-sleeve, or bishop’s sleeve, gives the dress a soft, feminine feel. Made with a full length hem, this dress would bear a very Victorian vibe.

A two layer hem paired with a corselet offers a chance to drape the hem. For the photos, I tucked the top layer of the front hem under the corselet’s waist. This creates a draped detail to the hem, and alters the look of the dress in a subtle way. In a fully black dress this trick isn’t too noticeable. Making the dress in two colours and draping the hem creates a more striking effect.

Don’t forget that The Embroidered Corselet is this week’s VIP-offer! Join our mailing list to gain access to special offers.

Next time, we’ll continue with the velvet print corselet. In Friday’s post I’ll also be revealing our theme for the next two weeks!

Until then.

Love,

Heather

Elastic Corselet

On Tuesday, I showed you a crochet skirt I made while back. The skirt, being quite red, needed another garment to soften the break to black, so I paired it with my Embroidered Corselet. I’ve blogged about it before, but today I wanted to write a fresh post on the soft, elastic corselet.

elastic waist corselet, image one

The Embroidered Corselet is one of our first products. It was published back in 2014, I think. When the product was first launched, I managed to anger a few hardcore corset fans with it. I failed to emphasize enough that this product is not meant to be a real corset. It’s elastic, it’s comfy, and it’s the only similarity it bears to corsets is the shape of the pattern. Made with elastic fabrics and without a lacing, this corselets serves its purpose as a wide belt.

The incident is long gone and forgotten, but it still bugs me sometimes. Steel boned, unyielding corsets are lovely to look at, but often uncomfortable to wear. Choosing what to wear under a corset is serious business: a button or a zipper in the wrong place can leave a painful mark on the skin. I for one love corsets, but sometimes it’s nice to wear something softer.

The Embroidered Corselet was born out of that desire. Made with a corset pattern but with stretchy fabric, it’s comfortable and easy to wear.

Since the original version is quite red, I’ve made another one with the same pattern. I made a minor modification to it, though. To bring in a bit more of the corsetry-feel, I added a lacing to the back of it, and changed to my trade-mark criss-cross buttoning.

The fabric is a thick poly-blend with elastane knit into it. Back in the year I-forget, I got to make my friend a dress from the fabric. She let me have what was left over, and I used the scraps to create an elastic corselet. I thoroughly love the red and orange splatters on the fabric! Since the corselet has many shades of red, it goes with most of my red accessories. I especially like the way it matches with my Tropical Breeze Shawl. For this outfit, I paired the corselet and the shawl with an upcoming dress pattern. I’m hoping to get it published soon so stay tuned! I’m also planning to feature the corselet in Tuesday’s I Made This! -post along with a few outfit ideas based on it. 

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about The Embroidered Corselet.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

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Red Crochet Skirt

Once upon a time, I decided to want a red crochet skirt. This happened before I made the black dress I showed you a while back. For this skirt, I used the same lace repeat. I really like this lace, it’s easy to hook, and lovely to look at. The repeat is only three rows high, so it’s also easy to memorize.

I crocheted the skirt with Novita’s long-gone Kotiväki. It’s a pretty basic mercerized cotton suitable for hook sizes 2,5mm to 3,5mm. I like working with larger hooks, so I liked the yarn. The consistency pleased me as well. I like natural fibers, and cotton works nice with lace. It also gives crochet projects really pretty stitch definition.

Finding a substitute for Kotiväki has proven surprisingly difficult. Fingering weight blends are numerous, but cotton is harder to come by. I guess I’ll have to settle for blends in the future.

Red Crochet Skirt Detail

I wanted my skirt to be tight, but not too tight to walk in. I wanted it long and narrow and fitted at the hip.

Achieving this was easier than I thought. I started at the waist with a 2,5mm hook and worked my way down upping hook size twice. This made the skirt widen without increases. When the skirt reached my knees, I changed to hook size 4mm, and worked the rest of the hem.

I like the way the skirt turned out. It doesn’t have a lining because I want to wear it with both short and long underskirts. Versatility is important to me, and this skirt provides it.

Crochet Skirt over Bodycon Dress

Crochet garments, especially lacey ones, are light and see-through. Petticoats are in order when wearing a lace skirt. For this outfit, I paired the red crochet skirt with The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress. Worn under the skirt, the dress provides coverage. It also doubles as a top.

To cover up the waist of the skirt, I wore The Embroidered Waist Corselet. This light-weight corselet is made with elastic material, and features buttons at the front, and light embroidery on the sides. Contrast coloured bone channels continue the red hem a bit higher, and make it blend into the top without a clear line. I like to do this when wearing colours. Combining two colours that are quite far from each other, it feels nice to bind them together with another garment. A hard break of colour in any outfit can seem a bit harsh.

Wearing a dress under a skirt comes with one more bonus feature: you won’t have a shirt tail to worry about.

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my red crochet skirt!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Two Styles for Pretty Basic Jersey Dress

On Tuesday, I promised to share outfit ideas based on The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress. I’ve decided one post isn’t enough, so more will come next week!  Playing models is loads of fun so I’ve ended up with too much ideas for just one post.

As you may have noticed, this post is the first in a new category called Everyday With an Edge. Posts under this label will focus on outfits and styling while featuring one or four of our designs. I hope you’ll like them!

LBD with Heart-Buckle Belt

The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress is my favourite thing to mix and match. It’s a clean slate, which makes it super-easy to style. The best part about this little black dress is that it doesn’t really need much.

I chose to pair the dress with basic black tights and a belt. The belt’s made with elastic lace and a heart-shaped buckle. The belt’s really cute, and adds a feminine touch to any outfit. Paired with a basic dress it accentuates the waist, and gives a bit more structure to the style.

The belt would have looked nice on its own, but I wanted to add more silver to the outfit. I wore a heavy wrist-band, lots of narrow rings, and my scissor-necklace.

Every time I wear the scissors, someone cracks the “oh, it’s because you sew” -joke. Old as it is, I always laugh politely.

When wearing necklaces, I like to pull my hair up. This way, it doesn’t cover the necklace.

Draped Red Dress

When I was little, I used to love trying on Mom’s jewellery. She had one ring that was overwhelmingly beautiful to an eight-year-old me.

Mom noticed, naturally, how much I loved the ring, and ten years later, she gave it to me. The ring still is as lovely to me as it was so many years ago. I wanted to build this outfit around the ring.

The ring is from the sixties, and goes pretty well with a brooch I have. As dresses were super-short in the sixties, I chose to use the brooch to shorten the hem of the red dress with.

Doing this is really simple: gather the hem up in folds, and secure to place with a brooch. This creates an asymmetrical shape, and can be used as an effect on both short and long hems.

To avoid showing too much leg, I wore a black skirt under the dress.

The outfit needed a bit more black, so I popped on my Reversible Waist Corset‘s black side. I topped the style with red pumps that match the dress.

Both of these outfits are ideal for shopping or casual dinners. They’re cute, comfy, and bear a bit of unique edge.

I hope you’ve enjoyed the first Everyday With an Edge -post!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Tropical Breeze

Once upon a time, I decided to need a really big crochet shawl to wear over basic dresses. During the summer, I like to grab a cardigan or shawl when venturing outside just in case the weather acts up. Cotton is my favourite material for shawls. It’s heavy, it’s nice to work with, and it isn’t too warm for the summer.

I had upcycled cotton stashed, so I decided to use it for a shawl. The yarn’s a bit too thick to work as a dress, but pretty perfect for shawls. For the pattern, I went to Drops. I’ve worked this style before, and really it. The pattern repeat is easy so it’s perfect for Flix-binging, and the simple lace works with all kinds of outfits. The pattern is called Tropical Breeze, and it’s available on Drop’s site.

This shawl is worked up from the lowest point. This gives it a nice triangle shape with a wide wingspan. The shawl is finished with a border, which always gives me a headache. This time, I only messed it up a little, and chose to leave the mistakes in. Maybe I’ll remember to concentrate better when reading instructions next time!

I really like the way the shawl turned out. It’s big, it’s heavy, it goes with everything, and the shade of red is just to my liking. I’m hoping this one will get a lot of wear in the warmer months.

My Tropical Breeze Shawl goes well with The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress. The shawl is a perfect cover up for the figure-hugging dress, and gives the black version a lot of colour. I like the combo of black and red, and the feel of the heavy shawl has something very decadent about it.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my crochet shawl!

Next time, I’m hoping to show you a few outfit ideas based on the Pretty Basic Jersey Dress. Until then.

Love,

Heather

Pretty Basic Jersey Dress

On Tuesday, I showed you some crochet projects I made just for the fun of it. Both the crochet dress and cardigan were paired with a red dress. Today, I wanted to share more info on the freshly published Pretty Basic Jersey Dress Sewing Pattern.

I like things that are easy to mix and match. Since dresses are my favourite thing to wear, I wanted to create a dress that goes with everything.

The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress is just that. It works with all kinds of cardigans and shrugs, can be paired with a belt of a corset, likes to hide under longer circle skirts and pose as a top, can even be made in mini-length and worn with leggings. With this dress, anything goes. And what’s best of all, it doesn’t really need to be accessorized. The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress is the kind of garment you can just pull on when you’re late for work, and still feel cute all day.

This style is designed to be made with viscose or cotton jersey. I chose solid colours for my two dresses. Black and red are the colours I wear most often, but this style works with other tones, too. Try a light beige to wear under lace garments. This will create a striking nude-look. Create the dress with a wild print for a fashion statement, or pick a light pastel to celebrate summer days in. Whatever your choice, this dress will love it.

The pattern is available in five sizes, from petite 32 to 40. It’s designed to be figure-hugging in a comfy way. The pattern comes with two neckline choices, and you can easily modify the hem and sleeves in length.

I hope you’ll enjoy The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress Sewing Pattern!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

PS. This dress, being freshly launched, will be the VIP special offer for two weeks in a row! If you haven’t already, be sure to join our mailing list to gain access for VIP-coupon codes.

Crochet Dress and Cardigan

A while back, I mentioned a little crochet project I was working on. Cotton and lace is a combo I really like, so one thing led to another. Instead of one lace garment, I now have two!

I found a basic pattern for a lace dress on Novita’s site many, many years ago. I loved it, but didn’t dare try it. After gathering more experience and courage in crocheting, I went back looking for the crochet dress pattern. Novita had taken it down, but I managed to dig up a chart for the lace repeat. I memorized it, tried to make a dress, and failed miserably. This spring, I tried again.

The lace repeat is relatively simple, but still lovely to look at. It’s airy and light, and reminds me of spiderwebs.

I used two hook sizes with the dress, 3mm and 3,5m. Upping the hook size at the hip gave the hem of the dress a bit more room and saved me from adding more stitches. This style is started at the empire line, and worked both up and down from there. The sleeves are worked separately, and the dress has a zipper in the back.

The dress turned out really pretty. I can’t remember how long I’ve wanted to make one, and now that I have, I want another one!

Crochet Dress worked with black cotton

After finishing the crochet dress, I sill had some yarn left. As spring was coming along, I figured I needed more lace. I didn’t have a cute, comfy cardigan to wear out, so I decided to need one.

I cast on another lace project, and before I knew it, I had my cute cardie.

Like the dress, this one is worked both up and down from the empire line. I added a triple crochet row there just in case I wanted to slip a contrast coloured satin ribbon in.

I left the cardie pretty short, and only used a 3mm hook.

I plan to wear this cardigan with dresses only, so I felt comfortable leaving the hem open. The cardigan closes only at the bust, which makes it perfect to wear even with waist corsets. Bright colours push through the lace, and make the cardigan super-cute over red and blue dresses.

The red dress will soon be published as a pattern. I’m planning to add more items to the Pretty Basics, and the figure-hugging dress will be the first in line. I’m also planning to start posting outfit photos on IG, so be sure to follow me there, too!

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my crochet dress and cardigan!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

EDIT: After a bit more searching, I found the pattern! It’s in Finnish only, but there are really clear charts.

Pattern

Charts

Reversible Corset

A while back, I mentioned a project I was working on. Finishing it took a bit longer than expected, but now I get to show you my Reversible Corset. It’s based on both The DeathRock Bustier, and The Reversible Waist Corset. I used the bustier pattern, and techniques from the waist corset.

I like to make clothes that can be paired with everything in my closet, and worn in many ways. This corset is a perfect example of both. It goes with all of my skirts and most of my dresses, and can actually be worn inside-out. It’s made with satin finished cotton and jacquard-print poly-blend. It has a zipper at the front, and lacing on the back which makes it easy to put on.

Since the corset is designed to be fully reversible, it doesn’t have a modesty panel. The lacing leaves my back partially exposed, so this style is best worn over a top or a dress. The DeathRock Bustier Pattern comes complete with a modesty flap, but working one into this mod of the original pattern was just too much for my spatial awareness.

This corset, along with The Reversible Waist Corset, is boned with spiral steel. I use it for most my corsets. It’s light and flexible, and makes corsets comfy to wear. I don’t go for tight-lacing, so light boning works well.

Getting the bone channels to look nice on both sides is surprisingly easy. All one needs is a bit of patience and accuracy.

I chose to create this corset with two black materials. Though the fabrics are close to each other in colour, they do bear a subtle difference in pattern. With two black options rolled into one, I get the most wear out of this corset.

For the photos, I paired the corset with a Victorian-inspired satin skirt made with two layers. The top layer of the skirt can be hitched up, which gives the style the versatility I love so much. The Victorian Skirt is available as a drafting tutorial.

I hope you enjoyed reading about my Reversible Corset!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Cabled Wristlets and Gloves

When a coat’s sleeves aren’t quite long enough, there’s only one solution.

No, it’s not called “buy a new coat”. It’s “wear long gloves”

The green coat I showed you on Tuesday sports just that issue. Me arms are pretty long, and patterns always have too short sleeves. The coat’s cute and pretty perfect for spring and fall, but it leaves my wrists feeling a bit left out. I’ve solved the problem by wearing with gloves that are a bit longer than usual, namely my Cabled Gloves.

To me, long gloves have always felt like they came straight out of a fairy-tale. Disney’s princesses wear opera gloves on their perfect night, and I associate the accessory to glamour and magic. When I first started designing knits, my initial thoughts were “yay, now I get to create all sorts of long gloves!”

The Cabled Wristlets and Gloves are, to date, my only long glove style. To tell you the truth, they’re not the most practical thing to wear with ordinary coats… With loose cape-like coats long gloves work wonderfully, though!

The Cabled Wristlets and Gloves Knitting Pattern was originally designed as a longer style. The pattern is versatile, though, and can easily be modded for a shorter version. My shortest Cabled Wristlets are made with a gray mohair-blend. Though they clash with my green coat, they go beautifully with dark outfits. As a shorter style, they’re nice to wear indoors as well. I’ve made two long pairs for myself, fingerless ones in lioness-yellow and full gloves in black, and a short version in subtle gray. I’ve also made a few pairs as presents.

Though this pattern features cables, it’s still a pretty easy pattern. Working this style requires basic skills in glove construction and basic knowledge of cabling, but I’d label it as not-too-challenging-intermediate.

I hope you’ll enjoy The Cabled Wristlets and Gloves Pattern!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

yellow cabled mitts, image two

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Modding a Green Coat

A long time ago, I made a coat with green wool fabric. I used a Burda pattern for the first time, and found it a really nice fit. The finished coat was a bit green for my taste. After I found it neglected in my closet, I decided to add a bit of black to it. 

Deciding how to start the embellished coat took some time. I pondered between lace, ribbons, and applique, I wanted the details to be thick and to really stand out. After rummaging around in my stash, I found black yarn left over from my black Elise shawl. The shawl is thick and warm, a perfect winter accessory, and I wanted to bring some of its warmth to my green coat.

I also found a really big crochet flower, which pretty much determined what I wanted to do with the yarn.

I took the flower, and sewed it onto the coat’s right pocket. Then, I took the yarn and crocheted smaller flowers into a string of chain stitches.

I ended up with a yard and a half of flowers…

I arranged the chain of flowers onto the coat, deciding to do the decorations on one side only. I then sewed them on by hand.

Had I known it would take forever, I might have chosen a different approach!

The result is lovely, though, and I’m happy with my choice. The flowers take away some of the coat’s greenness, and since the details are quite thick, they give the coat a bit of play with light and shadow.

The coat’s sleeves were a bit on the short side. I have long arms, and patterns often let me down in sleeve length. To give the sleeves a bit more length, I added a filet crochet cuff inside them. Though it’s not that long, it gives the coat more warmth, and serves as a pretty eye-catcher. Worn with long gloves, the coat is now nice to wear before the coldest winter days and as they start to pass.

Though I like the coat now with the black embellishments, I might add a bit more to it. The left sleeve is still quite green, and I’m thinking another string of flowers would look nice around it. The front hem of the coat might like some singular flowers, and maybe there could be a little detail on the neck…

Some projects are difficult to finish only because working on them is so much fun, and this coat is one of them.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Green Coat Mod!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather