Birthday Dress

On Friday, I promised to finally show you the dress I wore on my Birthday. It wasn’t as festive as the taffeta skirt I planned to wear, but still lovely. The dress was really comfy on the warm day, and made me feel pretty. I made my Birthday dress based on our upcoming pattern called The Pretty Basic Party Dress. It’s a jersey dress with a lace yoke. The dress is cute and comfy, and a very nice choice for summer’s casual parties.

I made my Birthday dress with black viscose jersey and a bit of really light elastic lace. The combo looks cute, falls beautifully, and is super-comfortable to wear.

My Birthday Dress has a lace yoke and lace sleeves. The lace is very light, and as I was sewing it, I thought it might not be the best choice for this. Viscose jersey is heavy, and most of the hem’s weight rests on the yoke. I was afraid  the lace might tear at a very inopportune moment, and spent five whole minutes coming up with a solution to lighten the lace’s load. I fixed the issue by adding straps. I’d just ordered removable bra straps on eBay, and found them a bit too wide. For dresses, though, they’re perfect. I took a pair of straps, and attached them to the dress beneath the lace. The solution is makes the dress feel more reliable, which is super-nice!

I didn’t want a complicated collar for the dress, and decided to go with a basic O-neckline. I bound the neckline with a strip of jersey to give it a more casual feel.

I was running a bit low on fabric. I still wanted cuffs, so I needed to improvise a bit. Instead of cutting both layers of the cuff on jersey, I used left-over lace. This little detail gives the dress a polished feel, and makes it feel extra-special.

I made the dress on impulse. Sewing it took less than two hours, and I’m super-happy with the result. The dress really is cute and comfy, and takes accessories really well. I trust you’ll be seeing more of it in future posts!

I made my Birthday Dress with viscose jersey and elastic lace

As said, this is a mod of our soon-to-come pattern. The Pretty Basic Party Dress will be this week’s VIP-offer, so be sure to join our mailing list to catch the discount code!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Over and Under – Three ways to rock a dress

Our featured pattern for this week is The Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern. The dress is made with two layers of light viscose jersey, and topped with a large hood. The pattern comes with a hoodless variation as well, and you can make the dress with only one layer of fabric if you so choose. I’ve made two mods of this pattern. I showcased both dresses last week, and the last few posts have featured different dress styles based on the black and blue twins.

I thought I’d make one Everyday With an Edge -post with these dresses before bringing our next week’s featured product. It’s going to be a flash-offer on a brand new pattern, so be prepared for next week!

In Tuesday’s post, I built two outfits with the same key elements. The first look continues along those lines, and features this summer’s hit product, the fishnet tights.

GrannySquare over Blue Dress

Being cold is one of my least favorite things. I don’t go out without a cardigan unless it’s super-warm! I created the first outfit keeping that in mind.

I used to live in a really cold house. During that time, I crocheted a huge square with sleeves. I wore it nearly daily, and after moving out, the cardigan was forgotten for a while. I dug it out again last spring, and found it to be both comfy and warm on cooler summer days. The GrannySquare Gardigan is available as a free crochet pattern.

I wear the cardigan quite often when stepping out. I love the ragged, flowing edges of it, and the way it allows colorful dresses to shine through it. The blue dress looks especially cute under it.

I completed the outfit with black fishnets and strappy sandals. I also added a lace choker. I made the choker a few days ago since they are starting to be IN again. I took a piece of elastic lace, and sewed a snap fastener to its ends. The project is super-fast and simple, and results in a cute accessory with a vintage vibe.

Party Look

I won’t deny the fact that we go out a lot. Life would be horridly dull without partying, so I wanted to turn the long-sleeved dress into something a bit more nightclub-appropriate.

Clubs are often crowded. I didn’t want to add a whole bunch of accessories that can get caught or fall off. Instead, I pushed the cuffs of the sleeves up to my elbows. This simple trick both shortens the sleeves, and enhances their shape. The over-all look of the dress changes a bit, to a more playful direction. I added a narrow belt, and tied its free end around itself. The belt sits a bit lower on the hips, and the looped end pulls it to an asymmetrical shape.

The silver pumps repeat the studs on the belt, and large silver hoops tie the details together.

I really like this easy, simple look. It’s quick to create, comfy to wear, and even cool on a sweaty dance floor. Dress styles such as this are my go to choices on Friday nights.

Flying Velvet

I have a lot of clothes with a high wardrobe malfunction risk. One of these “be very careful in this” -garments is a long wrap skirt made with velvet. I picked it up from a flea market, and though it is one of my favorite skirts, I never feel entirely comfortable in it.

I wanted to find a solution to my little dilemma, and decided to pair the skirt with the dress!

Tied over a knee-length dress, the wrap skirt will still fly open at an opportune gust of wind, but now it won’t matter. The dress beneath adds a safety feature, and serves as a cute top.

A accessorized this look only with a silver necklace and silver pumps.

The outfit is really nice, I like this look, but… thanks to a dress and a long layer of velvet, it’s warm. I’d feel uncomfortable wearing this to a club, though it does look pretty. My eyebrows would melt and I don’t even paint them on.

I hope you’ve had fun reading about these dress styles. Next week, I get to show you brand new dresses, including the one I actually wore for my Birthday party!

Until then.

Love,

Heather

Petrol Blue Styles

Last Tuesd… Wednesday, I showed you two dresses I made based on our Hooded Dress Pattern. I styled them for Friday’s post, and today, I’m going to share more outfits based on them.

I made both dresses with viscose jersey. It’s one of my favorite materials since it’s so soft and comfy and relatively easy to work with. As you know, I wear black, full stop. However, one of the dresses is petrol blue.

I like this particular shade of blue, but wearing it feels intimidating. To get over my fear, I decided to to add blue to both of today’s styles, and create outfits with blue details. I picked three other key elements and used them for both styles. These accessories are strappy sandals, fishnet tights, and a long chiffon belt.

Fishnets are really in right now, but instead of wearing them under ripped jeans, I wore them with dresses. This creates classy styles with a rebel vibe.

A Touch of Petrol

Wearing a top under or over a dress is an easy way to add color. I chose a petrol blue mesh top I got from H&Ms sale. It’s cute, and a perfect fit, but… well, it’s blue, and I really do have issues with colors!

I wore the blue mesh top under my black dress. This solution brought a touch of color to the outfit, but not too much. To add more detail, I took a long chiffon belt, and tied it around my waist. I wanted to bring in a girly detail, so I tied the belt into a soft bow.

The fishnets repeat the mesh in a grander scale. I picked the strappy sandals for both styles because it is summer. Warm weather is perfect for lighter footwear, and I for one need to keep reminding myself of it.

The outfit turned out really nice. It’s perfect for going shopping on a not-that-hot day.

Portable Shade

Last summer, I bought one of those wide rimmed sunhats. I got to wear it twice before sunny days drew to an end, and then I kinda forgot about it. Today, rummaging around in the wardrobe, I found it again, and decided to create an outfit around it.

Though the black dress would have been the obvious choice, I went with the blue one. Fishnets and sandals work wonders with this dress as well, and the chiffon belt brings in more black. I wore black pearls for an added detail, and popped on the sunhat.

I didn’t expect anything from this style, but it turned out so cute I actually squeed. I felt super-pretty in this outfit, and I can’t wait to wear it out!

I feel as though there’s a pin up -vibe in this outfit. Maybe it’s the hat or the fishnets, or just the combination of elements.

The hat is the most practical summer accessory I own. Despite the fact that it has a tendency of catching wind and going adventuring, it protects me from the sun. I burn easily, and a wide rimmed hat prevents that from happening. And it’s really cute.

I hope you had fun reading about my outfits with blue details!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Three Dress Styles

In this week’s I Made This! -post, I showed you two dresses I made based on our Hooded Dress Pattern. Both of the dresses are hoodless, and feature a narrower hem. In my personal style, I like to steer clear of hoods: I have loads of hair and forcing it under a hood always ends badly. I do love the shape of The Hooded Dress, though, and both of these dress-mods are my favorites. Today, I’m going to show you three styles based on these dresses.

Black and White Corselet

I’ve made quite a few light, plastic-boned corselets. I don’t wear them often, since plastic bones bend and feel uncomfortable. These little waist-enhancers are cool for taking pictures, but not much more. For the first outfit, I wanted to add one of them. I chose a black and white corselet I made a long, long time ago. It’s a basic style based on our Reversible Waist Corset. It has a button closure in the front, and lacing in the back. I like the way it looks, but being light and flimsy, it’s best left for photos alone.

I paired the corselet with the black version of the dress. I also added a light petticoat made with a bit of lace. As the petticoat is longer than the dress, the lace shows from under the hem, adding an ultra-feminine detail to the dress style.

I combed my hair over one shoulder for this style. I love the way it looks, but in reality, it only stayed put for a grand total of three minutes.

Red Lace Belt

I continued with the lace petticoat in the second outfit. I wanted to create an innocent style, and chose to go with a high empire waist. I took the long lace belt that comes with our Lace Skirt Pattern, and tied it twice around my waist. I secured the belt with a brooch to keep it from opening. Another option would have been to tie it into a little bow, but I felt it was a bit too much. A brooch turns this style a bit more grown-up.

As I really liked the hair over the shoulder -thing, I tied it into a braid for this style. The braid does behave better, but an up-do would look nice with this dress style, too.

I added red pumps to this outfit to bring in another red detail.

Going through the photos, I found that this outfit kinda reminded me of Claudia in Interview With The Vampire. There’s something childlike in this look, and I really like it.

Black Shrug

The last outfit is a re-creation of something I actually wore out. I went to a weekly pub quiz all winter on Mondays, and the pub was really cold. On one of the last quiz-nights, I was running late. It was cold outside, so I threw on two layers made up of the first garments I found in my closet. I came up with this dress style, and totally loved it!

I wore the blue version of The Hooded Dress. Under it, I wore our Garter Petticoat (which I left out for these photos since it’s now pretty warm), our Reversible Waist Corset, and a black shrug. I felt really pretty in this, and the outfit was both warm and comfortable.

I like the way the black lace of the dress looks with added black details. Without it, the dress would be all too blue.

The Hooded Dress Pattern will be our VIP-offer through next week, so now’s a good time to become a VIP by joining our mailing list.

Next week, I’ll feature some more outfits based on these dresses!

Until then.

Love,

Heather

Black and Blue Dresses

My spouse travels a lot due to his work. Whenever he goes abroad for a longer while, I make myself a new jersey dress. This habit started at the very beginning of our relationship, and, well, I have lots of dresses now. The latest addition is a petrol blue number. It’s a mod of our Hooded Dress Sewing Pattern.

Colors are scarce in my wardrobe. I like black, and wear it most of the time. A while back I was, once again, turning the internet upside down in search of a cute fabric. Instead of a skull printed cotton I was actually looking for, my eye caught petrol blue viscose jersey. The concept of wearing a blue jersey dress seemed both foreign and intriguing, so I ordered the fabric along with a bit of black lace.

… and some other little things such as a whole heap of black jersey.

The fabric arrived, and it was soft and nice and Very Blue. Though wearing it seemed daunting, I stuck to my decision, and turned it into a dress.

The Hooded Dress Pattern is a pretty straight-forward style. The original version is made with two layers of light jersey and a hood. I made the blue dress with just one layer, and without a hood. I cut the neckline a bit lower, and double-bound it. A touch of black lace was just what the bright petrol needed!

The original dress has a knee-length, super wide hem. I made the hem a little shorter, and a lot narrower. I also trimmed the hem with black lace. I knew that I’d wear this with black accessories, and wanted to add as much black as possible.

I love the way the dress turned out, but I’ve only worn it out once. It’s so blue I feel like an exclamation point in it! The shape and style, especially the sleeves, please me quite well, so I…

… maybe made another one in black…

The black version of the jersey dress has quickly become my go to -dress. I wear this on almost every “I cannot find the right dress!” -night, and always feel super-comfortable in it. And the best part is that this style takes accessories really well! On Friday’s Everyday With an Edge -post, I’ll show you three styles based on these dresses.

Until then!

Love,

Heather

Victorian Inspired Outfit – two styles

This week we’ve been talking about Victorian skirts. I for one love long, ruffled hems, and wear them pretty often. Styling them is so much fun, and whenever I log on Polyvore, I end up with a Victorian inspired outfit. Today I’m going to show you guys two Victorian inspired looks based on our patterns. One of them is still in the making, but will soon become a part of our Pretty Basics -line.

Victorian with a Splash of Red

The black taffeta skirt I made for my Birthday doesn’t have a versatile hem. Sometimes it’s nice to alter long hems a bit, and that’s when brooches come in handy. For this look, I added a touch of red. I wore a long, red satin skirt with the black taffeta skirt. I then folded the hem, and secured the fold with a brooch. This creates an asymmetric detail to the hem. The red petticoat peeks out from under the shorter spot, and adds color to the style.

This trick works for both long and short hems. I’ve used it once before with Pretty Basic Jersey Dress styles, and plan to show you more ways to take advantage of it. Gathered details are a great way to alter the look of garments, and brooches add even more unique detail.

The outfit needed a bit more color, so I added my favorite corselet. This elastic waist enhancer is super-comfortable, and I wear a lot. I’m planning to make another one in black, so that I can pair a comfy waist corselet with blue tones, too.

The top in this Victorian inspired outfit is the soon-coming addition to our Pretty Basics. It’s a jersey Tee with a U-neckline and puff-sleeves made with chiffon.

I really like the way the outfit looks and feels. It’s perfect for clubbing, and I can’t wait to wear this out!

Black is my favorite color, but sometimes it's nice to add a touch of red. This Victorian inspired outfit features a red petticoat.

All Black

Our Victorian Skirt is, as mentioned quite a few times before, one of my favorites. I love its versatility and shape, and it is a staple piece in my wardrobe. For this look, I gathered the upper hem evenly all around. I love the way soft satin drapes and falls. This skirt looks quite narrow though the hem is quite wide, and I really like that. Often Victorian skirts are really very large, and large hems can be difficult to wear. This is light and soft, and doesn’t come in the way when walking through narrow alleys and doorways.

I paired the skirt with our Yoked Blouse. The blouse is best made with slightly elastic cotton and thick, also elastic chiffon. The combo of see-through and non-see-through materials gives the blouse a classy look. A touch of lace adds femininity, and the super-long sleeves shelter you from the sun. I also added a waist corset to give this Victorian inspired outfit a more refined look.

This outfit is something I wear regularly whenever I feel like. It’s surprisingly comfortable, and makes me feel pretty.

This Victorian inspired outfit features our rarely seen Yoked Blouse.

I hope you’ve enjoyed today’s Everyday With an Edge -post.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Birthday Outfit

Last week’s theme was quite Victorian. We’ll continue in the same direction today as I’ll finally show you my finished taffeta skirt. I made the skirt for my Birthday, and intended to wear it for my party. Weather, as it turned out, had a different opinion about my plans. The day was hot and humid, and after getting dressed and gotten photos taken, I changed into something else. A long jersey dress with lace inserts was a much more comfortable choice, but I still felt super-warm all day.

I made the taffeta skirt with the help of our Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial. I altered the original style a bit. My skirt only has one layer, and no ribbon channels for hitching up the hem. The skirt is still pretty, and likes many kinds of tops.

For my Birthday, I paired it up with a lace blouse and a waist corset.

The lace blouse is store-bought. I got it from a flea market with its tags cut off, so I can’t tell you who made it. It’s lovely, though, with wide ruffles at the cuffs and a very high collar. It’s made with elastic lace, so it’s comfy, too.

The corset is hand-made. It’s a prototype of our Reversible Waist Corset, actually. I made the black satin corset with purple lining and bone channels, and a criss-cross button closure at the front. The back has a lacing and a modesty panel, so this one works wonderfully with skirt-blouse -combos. The chains on the corset can be removed: they have clasps, and attach to little loops sewn into the seams.

For some reason, I don’t own a lot of jewelry. I guess I’ve always concentrated more on clothing. These pieces are my favorites, though, and I wear them often. I got the ankh when I was 14 or so, and it bears a lot of sentimental value. The pearls I bought a few years back, and they quickly became my trusted companions.

I like the way they go with this particular blouse. The ankh obscures the button list a bit (when it’s not hiding inside it, next time I’ll remember to check photos more closely!) and the pearls give the blouse a bit more femininity.

I really liked this outfit, and it would have been perfect for the party. I’ve probably mentioned that summer isn’t a very good time to dress Victorian! Let’s hope I’ll get to wear this some other time.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Two Victorian Skirt Styles

On Tuesday, I showed you sneak peaks of a skirt I made for my Birthday. My black taffeta skirt is all done, but I’ll share it fully next week. Today, I wanted to share two outfits based on another skirt.

My taffeta skirt was made with the help of our Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial. I made mine with only one layer, and without the option to wear it hitched up. I have, however, made a full version of the Victorian Skirt, and it’s one of my favorite styles. The skirt is pretty and versatile, and I feel comfortable in it. It’s one of my go-to -garments that both look and feel like Me.

The Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial isn’t a pattern, and does not come with one. Instead, it will help you to draft your own pattern for your own measurements. It also comes with a fully illustrated sewing tutorial.

The skirt looks complicated, and can feel intimidating to make, but trust me,  it’s really super-easy!

Wearing this skirt is also easy. Despite the Victorian vibe that practically cries for a corset, the skirt actually likes casual tops, too.

Wrap-Cut Top with Victorian Vibe

Summer calls for lighter outfits, but it’s difficult to lighten a Gothic style. RomantiGoths have a pretty hard time during the warm season: layers of long hems and blouses and corsets can make us very uncomfortable. Popping on a black sundress and just saying F**k This to image is a perfectly acceptable option (I do it all the time) but sometimes it’s nice to go for a more distinct look. I wanted to create a summer style based on The Victorian Skirt.

I made this skirt with polyester satin, so it’s pretty hot during the summer. Using light cotton will make this skirt cooler to wear on warm days. It will look lovely made with cotton, but comfort-level will increase big time. To show you that the skirt doesn’t need to be worn with a corset, I paired it with the orange version of our Wrap-Cut Top. The asymmetric hem and lace create an interesting opposite to the romantic hems. The sleeveless top makes the outfit cool and comfy.

I added black pearls and bangles to this style. I wanted to concentrate on just two colors, and hesitated introducing a third one as jewelry. A two-toned style is elegant in an easy way.

Summer days are often sunny, and going out like this terrifies me. Getting a tan is not an option! When venturing out, I would add a sun hat (black, of course) or a parasol. And of course loads of sunblock!

The Secretary

Introducing masculine elements to feminine outfits is both popular and fun. I like to call this style the Secretary-look. This look works even better with a pencil skirt. Personally, I don’t feel comfortable in them, but they do look super-cute on everyone else.

The Secretary-look is easily achieved by pairing up a fitted blouse, a black tie, and a waist corset. A neat bun increases the effect of this style even further.

I chose to wear this with The Victorian Skirt because this is one of my signature styles. I love this outfit, and would wear it to a party any day.

But with socks and different shoes! Today was suffocatingly warm, and I could not face wearing socks with this skirt.

The Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial will be our VIP-offer for the next two weeks. On Tuesday, I’ll show you what I decided to pair my new skirt with for my B-Day party!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Black Taffeta Skirt

It’s my Birthday next Monday and to celebrate, I’ll be hosting a small party on Saturday. These two things combined meant that I needed a new skirt. I had some taffeta stashed, and since this is a pretty big Even Number -thing, it felt OK to sew a skirt with a nicer fabric. I decided to show you only sneak peaks of my black taffeta skirt today. It’s all wrinkly and needs a wash before  it can be worn. I want to wear in on Saturday, so I’ll showcase an outfit based on it next Tuesday.

Taffeta sounds super-fancy, and it can be that. When you think of taffeta, you probably see a starched evening gown that rustles softly on a red carpet. Taffeta is a twisted-woven fabric type which can be made with fibers varying from silk to polyester. A high-quality taffeta is made with natural fibers, and suitable for wedding dresses. My skirt is made with a “yeah, just going to a Goth-gig” -grade polyester. It has a lovely shine to it, but at 4€/meter, I wouldn’t be caught dead going to a proper party in this.

For my “Friends Only and To The Pub Later” -B-Day it’s perfect, though. I’m very likely to get champagne spilled on me, and this won’t mind.

On my Birthdays, I tend to make a point of wearing something that both looks and feels like me. This one doesn’t make an exception to the rule. I chose black taffeta because it is one of my favorite materials due to its shine and toughness. The style is also one of my favs.

The skirt is snug at the waist, and wide at the hem. I made it with a visible zipper in the center back seam, and a narrow waist band. One of the reasons I like poly taffeta so much, is how it gives seams a very crisp finish. If you concentrate just a little bit, achieving a professional result is really quite easy.

I worked the skirt using French seams. This technique gives the inside of a garment a tidy finish. I use it often with light fabrics and/or wide hems.

You’ve probably already guessed which pattern I used.

This black taffeta skirt is a mod based on our Victorian Skirt Drafting Tutorial. The skirt is exactly the same as in the pattern, only I made with just one layer and without the option to wear it hitched up.

The hem of the skirt has a wide ruffle. I used a strip of fabric to hide the seam, and sewed a narrow rolled hem to the skirt. This is the first garment in a long time I made using only my sewing machine!

I don’t yet know what I’m going to pair my black taffeta skirt with on Saturday, but I promise an outfit post for next week so stay tuned!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Two Velvet Skirt Looks

On Tuesday, I showed you a long velvet skirt I made based on our Lace Skirt Pattern. In today’s Everyday With an Edge -post, I wanted to share two more outfit ideas with the skirt.

Long skirts aren’t the right choice for a walk through a forest, but they’re wonderfully comfortable in the city. A long hem offers coverage from both the sun and curious eyes, and is an easy way to achieve a polished look. My velvet skirt is the kind of skirt that goes with pretty much anything. Paired with a jersey top, it makes a cute everyday-look. With a bit of lace, it turns into a comfy style for an evening out.

I planned these outfits to be as comfy as possible. They’re both best for a day of shopping, or dinner at home with the family

Velvet Skirt with Lace Cardigan

Crochet lace is one of all-time favourite things. It’s beautiful, bears a vintage vibe, and can make any outfit decadently pretty. For this outfit, I paired the velvet skirt with a basic spaghetti-strap top, an elastic belt, and a crochet cardigan I made just this spring.

 I’ve been binging on Downton Abbey lately, and wanted to create an elegant outfit to incorporate a little bit of the 1920s decadence. During the early 1920s, hems started creeping upward, and waist lines dropped drastically. Materials used in clothing were rich and detailed, especially in evening wear.

This style is very much inspired by Downton Abbey’s wealth. I like the way the cardigan and long skirt create a narrow silhouette, and the way black pearls subtly hint toward the era.

Gypsy Look

Everything off-shoulder was a big thing last summer, and the trend is still going strong. Though off-shoulder styles look lovely, they do come with one or two little issues. They tend to fall off, and when one leans over, they offer a good look at everything.

I planned this outfit to be free of both issues.

I made the off-shoulder top with chiffon sleeves last spring, and am still in the process of turning it into a pattern. For the photos, I wore the top over a basic spaghetti-strap top. I also wore a waist corselet over it. Now if the off-shoulder top slides out of place, I have the spaghetti-strapped one to trust. The corselet serves not only as a pretty detail, but to keep the top securely in place when leaning. With added safety-features, the off-shoulder top can actually be worn outside!

I paired the tops and corselet with my velvet skirt to achieve a modern gypsy-look. The large sleeves remind me of fortune tellers, so I wanted to incorporate some of their style. Instead of the romantic style with flowing hems and scarves, I chose a sleeker style. With less to look at, the outfit draws more attention to subtle details.

I felt really comfortable in this outfit, and almost wore it to my aunt’s birthday party. I decided against this only because the day was sunny and hot, and velvet would have been too warm.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about the velvet skirt looks!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather