Escalator Ate My Dress!

I didn’t have the best day yesterday. I slept poorly and woke up too early. I decided to have a knitting day, but I didn’t have anything interesting on the needles. Leafing through Facebook, I noted that Eurokangas was having a flash sale on select items. As I didn’t have anything urgent planned, I deemed myself worthy of retail therapy. I had my coffee while playing Hearthstone, threw on my favorite long jersey dress, and headed out.

I met my spouse, whom I call Charming, in the city center and went to the fabric store while he ran an errand. I couldn’t find anything I liked, and after he came to collect me, we left empty-handed.

On the way out, the most terrifying thing happened. I wore a long dress, and stepped on an escalator like I’d done a hundred times before, without giving it a second thought. As the steps grew smaller and smaller, disappearing into a dark no-man’s-land, I realized, to my horror, that my dress followed!

I thought I screamed, but was later told that I let out the smallest sound, one little word.

help

Had I been alone, I would have just stood there on receding steps, desperately clinging on to my dress without the faintest idea of what else to do. Luckily, Charming was there to hit the emergency-button. That stopped the stairs from moving, but I was caught.

He ran back up, got scissors from a very startled clerk, and cut me loose. There was little else to do, and my dress came out horridly mutilated. I couldn’t believe that an escalator ate my dress! I thought this only happened in nightmares!

escalator ate my dress

A “normal” person would have just tossed the dress, but I’m crafty. I really like this dress, and wanted to save it.

I had a few options, but I decided to cut the hem at knee-length.

The surgery left me with some undamaged fabric which I decided to use to mod the sleeves. The original dress had short sleeves. I’m not that into the “short dress with short sleeves” -concept, so I went ahead to alter the sleeves.

I cut off the original cuffs…

and cut out two A-lined pieces to lengthen the sleeves with. This process would leave me with long trumpet sleeves with seams above the elbow.

The original dress is made with plain viscose jersey. I was working on turning the dress into a pattern, but I hadn’t taken product pictures of it before the accident. I’m thinking I might go ahead with the pattern, and wrap two styles into one, but who knows. I might even order viscose jersey, and make myself a new dress! 

I had elastic lace stashed for emergencies, and this was nothing short of one. I used the lace to bind the hem and sleeves.

The entire process to save the dress took about an hour, and I’m super-happy that I took the time to do it. The dress turned out cute and comfy, and the lace gives it a lovely detail. I’d completely forgotten how much I love trumpet sleeves!

The new and improved dress really likes the company of Lovelace and Lune, too!

I hope you’ve enjoyed this true story about the day when an escalator ate my dress.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Purlace

Purlace, our new gloves knitting pattern, was launched on Friday. Today, I wanted to share a bit more info about these intricate gloves. I love this pattern, and I hope you will, too!

Purlace and its sister-pattern Lovelace are this week’s featured products with Lune. I’m thinking about doing another outfit post on Friday, but today we’ll concentrate on Purlace.

I wear knit gloves, and knit gloves alone during the winter. Layers of wool keep my hands warm better than leather, and often hand-knit gloves are more unique than store-bought ones. I wanted Purlace to be beautiful but still comfortable. That’s why I chose to work them with reverse stockinette and lace. I wanted to make the outside lovely to look at, and the inside smooth against the hand. Reverse stockinette gave me just that: Purlace are super-pretty, and still soft to wear. They’ll be even softer if you use a yarn with a smooth finish. I worked the model gloves with Novita’s Nalle, and was rewarded with a nice and painful yarnburn on my finger. I would advice against using that! Leafing through amazon, I found an acrylic yarn that might be pretty perfect for this pattern. This Red Heart yarn is a bit lighter from Nalle, but the gauge is pretty close. If you purchase the yarn through the link below, I might earn a little extra.
Coats Yarn Red Heart Comfort Sport Yarn

Purlace have a lot of details. They’re embellished with cables and lace columns, and have a hidden thumb gusset.

I chose coin cables for these gloves. Both the wrist and the back of the glove bear a similar pattern. The cables on the wrist end to leave the palm smooth, but the ones on the back of the hand continue to reach the fingers.

Lace columns climb all the way to the tops of the forefinger and pinkie on both sides.

These gloves have a lot going on. That’s why I recommend using solid colors for Purlace. Self-striping yarns are beautiful, but they tend to make intricate styles a bit busy. With cables and lace, one color is better than many.

Purlace look challenging to work, and they do require a bit of knitting skills. I wouldn’t call this an overwhelming project, though. Purlace is an intermediate pattern, tops! Lace and cables aren’t that difficult if you know the basics, but the pattern requires you to know how to read charts.

I hope you’ll love our Purlace Gloves Knitting Pattern as much as I do!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Fall Looks

On Tuesday, I promised to launch The Purlace today. Here they are! I love these gloves, and can’t wait to wear them out again. Purlace along with their sister-pattern Lovelace are this week’s featured product. I also added Lune to the bunch, since it’s pretty difficult to create outfits based on gloves alone! Today, I wanted to show you a few outfits I really like to wear during the autumn. All of them feature Lune which is my second favorite scarf. It’s perfect for creating fall looks!

Out? But It’s Cold!

It’s too early for winter coats, but too cold for cardigans. I like to sort out the coat-problem with light layers and blazers. This one is my favorite one. It’s a basic H&M corduroy blazer. I got it from a flea market at least ten years ago for one €. I expected it to fall apart the next day, but it held on.

It held on long enough to “shrink in the wash a bit” so to make it more comfortable, I added a lacing in the back. I’ll feature the blazer at a later time, I promise!

For this look, I paired it with a pencil skirt, a few tops beneath, and my black and green Lune. The Purlace Gloves look fab with this style, adding a super-feminine detail to the androgynous lines. This outfit is pretty perfect for shopping and running errands in, and I really love this kinds of looks in the fall.

You can’t see the gloves that well in the outfit photo, so here’s a close-up on them!

… Chilly Indoors, Too

Wearing light layers is an easy way to stay warm. This is what I wore under the blazer!

For some reason, I have an H&M lace top in green. I’m not that nuts about the color, but it goes perfectly with my Lune. Pairing these two up was a natural choice. I wore a mesh tee under the top because it’s far too cold for spaghetti straps alone. The top combo is pretty girly. I wore them with a pencil skirt to make the outfit look more grown-up.

Lune is designed to worn around the neck. It loves to be thrown over the shoulder, and stays put really well. It can be worn as a shawl, too, though it is a bit on the narrow side.

Mmm Purple

The Pretty Basic Jersey Dress has quickly become The Dress I Love The Most. After taking photos of this look I thought “oh I’ll just leave this on to go out in later” only to realize I wore it last weekend, too… That just goes to show you how often I wear this one!

For this look, I paired The Jersey Dress with my black and purple Lune and fingerless Lovelace. I used the same yarn for both, so the scarf and gloves go perfectly together. I used to live in a really cold house, and my hands hurt all the time. To keep them warm, I wore fingerless gloves. They really did the trick. Nowadays I only “have to” be cold outside, and fingerless gloves are reserved for fall outings. The Lovelace Gloves are so pretty I often choose them.

This look is my favorite of the bunch just because it’s so comfy and features that pretty shade of purple.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about our fall looks! Don’t forget, Lovelace, Purlace, and Lune are our featured products until October 2nd. They’re on sale for all VIPs, so if you want 15% off on them, go ahead and subscribe for our newsletter!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Lovelace and Purlace

Temperatures have dropped drastically here in Finland. Leaves are starting to turn yellow, and it smells like frost outside. It’s not yet cold enough to switch to winter clothes, but chilly enough to dig out scarves and gloves. This time of year I go for blazers, warm scarves, and fingerless gloves. Today, I wanted to show you some of my favorites, and an upcoming pattern for super-pretty gloves!

I like accessories with little detail. Lace shawls aren’t really my thing, though they are beautiful to look at. Simple things with interesting texture are more to my personal taste. I created Lune last winter, and it quickly became my second favorite scarf. Lune’s easy to wear, stripy, and so basic it goes with almost any outfit. I love the pattern so much I made two!

Lune is a knitting pattern for a crescent shawl

The original Lune is black and green. My second one is made with black and purple stripes with Novita’s Nalle. It’s a Finnish wool blend that is available in any store and in any color and at an affordable price. It would be a really good deal, if the yarn didn’t love my forefinger so much. Two hours of knitting, and it’s dug its way inside no matter how much tape I hide it under. The yarn is warm, though, and somehow makes its way into Christmas presents. Right now I only have one ball stashed, and I’m hoping Nalle hasn’t found out where I live now.

Anyway, I used black and purple Nalle for a Lune last winter. I really like this scarf, and a long soak in fabric softener took away some of the hardness. I’d really like to know how Novita has managed to make it so rough and painful to work…

My black and purple Lune has a crochet shell edge to give it a more feminine vibe. The original version is unisex, but this one fits a lady’s wardrobe better. After casting off, I still had some purple yarn left. I divided to ball in two, and used to work fingerless Lovelace gloves.

The Lovelace pattern came out last spring. I had horrible timing in launching the pattern: Lovelace came out just when everyone wanted to start working on light cotton garments for the summer! The Lovelace pattern will be our featured product through next week along with its sister-pattern, Purlace, and Lune.

I worked the original Lovelace Gloves in an unusual color. I found a ball of yellow mystery yarn (it loved to burrow its way into my finger, so it must have been Nalle), and it wanted really badly to become a pair of intricate lace gloves. The Lovelace pattern took its sweet time to come out, but the gloves are beautiful.

After casting off Lovelace, I cast on another pair of lace gloves with the same general idea of lace columns continuing from wrist to hand to fingers. I worked these in black Nalle, and decided to wait until fall to launch the pattern. Now’s the time, and Purlace will come out on Friday!

I hope you’ll enjoy our Lovelace and Purlace patterns!

Until Friday!

Love,

Heather

Bishop Wrap Styles

Our Bishop Wrap Sewing Pattern was launched last week. and it’s been this week’s featured product. On Tuesday, I paired it up with a Spaghetti Strap Top and a seed stitch shawl I knit a while back. Today, I’ll show you a few more wrap dress styles.

As you know, wrap dresses can be challenging to wear. Belts and buttons are kinda restricting outfit-wise, and set limitations to wrap dress styles. The Bishop Wrap is shaped like a wrap dress, but free of belts. That makes it a bit easier to wear.

The Bishop Wrap loves corsets and shawls. I wanted to keep all of these looks clean and simple to show off the elegant lines of the dress itself.

Embroidered

The first outfit features our Embroidered Corselet, an elastic waist enhancer decorated with rows of flowers. The corselet is super-comfy. It’s meant to be a decoration only, and to add a cute detail to almost any outfit. The Embroidered Corselet works especially well with this dress. It enhances the waist, and helps support the weight of the hem.

I really like the way red details pop out in an all-black outfit. The embroidered flowers are tiny, but they still bring color to this style. Red bone channels and buttons also help in making the outfit brighter. A red crochet shawl with a floral pattern would look gorgeous with this style!

This outfit has a romantic feel. I left my hair (which I have decided not to cut short) loose to keep the look soft and feminine. Light make-up keeps the look simple and fit for everyday wear.

Cabled

I really like shrugs, and wear them often to keep warm. Draft makes my shoulders hurt a bit, and a shrug is an easy way to keep cold air at bay. For the second look, I paired The Bishop Wrap with our Faux Cable Shrug and Reversible Waist Corset. The combo turns the dress in a more elegant way. To make the look sleek and chic, I tied my hair into a low bun.

I really like this look. The shrug is soft and comfy, and I thoroughly love the way the collar rises up to warm the neck. Soft faux cables along the sleeves and the edging give it a soft, feminine feel. Despite the details, the shrug is actually quite easy to knit up.

The corset is still one of my favorites, though I really should make a new one to replace it. I’ve worn it so much it’s starting to come apart!

Draped

You might remember my fascination toward draped details, and the brooch I use to create them. The Bishop Wrap is made with viscose jersey, which means it drapes beautifully. The material is light and soft, and falls in a delicate manner. For this look, I wanted to add a daring detail to match the neckline. I pulled one side of the front to the side, gathered it into soft folds, and secured it with a brooch. This created a long slit into the dress, and left one leg revealed. To keep the dress from showing too much, I’d use a safety pin to secure the lower front pieces together.

This look might seem a bit scandalous, but, well, I’ve seen much, much more revealing skirts in broad daylight. Compared to bare bottoms this is chic.

The brooch looks like antique-silver, so I chose to wear vintage earrings Mom gave me. I topped off the look with silver pumps from H&M.

The shoes look fab, but they’re just a little bit too high to be comfortable. For parties, though, they’re cool!

Skulls

As usual, the last outfit is the one I love best, and the one I wear the most. I love The Bishop Wrap with its cute sleeves and daring neckline and long wrap-cut hem, and for my taste, it works best with my favorite corset. This is the “right” side of The Reversible Corset. It bears a skull print, and black bone channels. The “wrong” side is completely black, and top stitched on both sides of the seams. I usually go with the black side, but the skull print is fun for a change. I picked it for this look to bring a playful element to The Bishop Wrap. The dress itself is elegant and grown-up, but it doesn’t mean it can’t be made fun!

I hope you’ve enjoyed our wrap dress styles!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Seed Stitch Shawl

On Friday, I promised you two outfit posts for this week. Still, I wanted to show you guys something I made!

Fall is almost here, and it’s time to dig out shawls and gloves. I took a quick peek around my winter wardrobe, and remembered I haven’t showed you my favorite shawl. I think it may be because the shawl is a very basic triangle, black, and worked in seed stitch. As lovely as it is to wear, it’s not very photogenic.

See?

I made the shawl with Novita’s Rose. It’s worked from side to side, entirely in seed stitch. Knitting this was the most boring task ever, and I watched loads of movies during the process. I’ve grown a liking toward seed stitch, but knitting it is just plain old boring. The surface seed stitch creates is lovely, and seed stitch garments are super elastic. The stitch is versatile, too. I’ve used it in so many things I can’t even count that far.

After casting off, I decided to add a little crochet border to my seed stitch shawl. I like lace, and the shawl seemed to need a little something to make it special. I just did a basic picot edge, but it did add a cute detail to the shawl.

I usually wear this around my neck during the coldest winter, but it is big enough to wear as a shawl. For outfit photos, I wore the shawl with The Bishop Wrap. That dress sure loves its shawls!

This look is cute and comfy, and the shawl adds an extra layer of warmth. I’m quite certain this outfit will get loads of wear in the winter. It’s pretty perfect to wear for our weekly quiz. The pub it’s held at is super-cold, so the seed stitch shawl will sure come in handy.

You might remember that The Bishop Wrap is quite revealing. It has a generous neckline that might not be suitable for every occasion. To tone it down and make it a bit more modest, I wore a Spaghetti Strap Top under it. Blue lace peeks out beautifully from under the dress, and gives it not only a cute detail, but also more coverage.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my seed stitch shawl! Be sure to join us on Friday for another outfit post.

Until then!

Love,

Heather

Bishop Wrap

Wrap dresses are lovely and elegant. They flatter all body types, and can be styled up for nearly any occasion. The belts, though, can be a bit annoying at times. A cute bow is pretty to look at, and loose belts create an interesting detail, but they make styling a wrap dress all the more difficult. I wanted a wrap dress that would have an open hem, a revealing neckline, and no belts or buttons. I also wanted to incorporate my favorite sleeve style to the design. Thus was born our brand new wrap dress sewing pattern, The Bishop Wrap.

The Bishop Wrap has a long hem that’s open on both sides up to the hip. It comes with a daring neckline that can be made with or without a gathered detail. This dress is best made with elastic materials such as light viscose or cotton jersey. I made mine in black, but this style loves wild prints and bright colors. 

A viscose jersey similar to the one I used is available on amazon. I also picked out a beautiful green snake print viscose jersey. If you purchase materials through the links below, I might make a little extra.
Black Viscose Spandex Fabric, Causal Jersey Knit Fabric, Fabric by the Yard – 1 YARD
Snakeskin Print Viscose Stretch Jersey Knit Dress Fabric Green – per metre

The Bishop Wrap has long, wide sleeves that are gathered at the wrist with a tight cuff. I personally love this sleeve style. It’s feminine and comfortable, and bears a vintage feel. The bishop sleeve was hugely popular in the sixties, and I actually have a few vintage patterns that rock this style.

This wrap dress pattern comes with a full length hem. I highly recommend using a light fabric for this dress. The hem takes a lot of fabric, and a heavy material can make it stretch and pull in wear. A light material makes the dress comfortable to wear.

The Bishop Wrap loves belts and corsets. It can be paired with all kinds of waist enhancing accessories. This dress also likes the company of cardigans and shrugs. Next week, I’ll show you how to rock this wrap dress in two different Everyday With an Edge -posts!

As you may have guessed, The Bishop Wrap Dress Pattern is our featured product for the coming week. It will be on sale for all VIPs, so now’s a good time to join our mailing list to gain access to the special offer.

I hope you’ll enjoy The Bishop Wrap! I’ll see you on Tuesday!

Love,

Heather

Dress Make-Over

Once upon a time, I had a dress that had never felt quite right, and a top that just didn’t work. I made the dress a while back, felt displeased, and modded it a bit. It still didn’t feel right, so it got buried in my wardrobe.

The top I got as a souvenir from Mom a long, long time ago. That was back when she still tried to understand what I like. Sadly, she forgot that I’m horrified of spiders.

A few weeks ago, I found both the top and the dress, and asked them whether they’d like to get tossed, or play nice together.

The answer was obvious. Dress make-over!

I liked the shape of the top along with its mesh sleeves. The dress had a nice hem, so I decided to combine them. This way, I’d get to make the best of both item’s good qualities.

I started by taking out my scissors. I got these from my ex-mother-in-law (she didn’t die or anything, I just got divorced) a few years ago. I’m not really into the Moomin-thing, but Fiskars makes the kind of scissors I love. They’re durable, easy to sharpen, and comfortable to use.

The scissors are available on amazon in case you’re into Moomin characters. If you get them through the link below, I might earn a little extra.
Moomin Stainless Steel Moominmamma Scissors

I cut the dress at the waist so that I could use all of the hem. I ended up shortening it a bit, though. I like hems to fall mid-thigh, knee, or all the way to the floor, and this one ended up in the gray area of “below the knee”, commonly known as eww in my world.

I also cut the top at the waist. I like waistlines to sit at the narrowest part of the waist. Through this procedure, I gained a bit of cobweb-print material. I used it cut out basic cuffs to replace the ragged ruffles at the sleeves.

I like those, basically, in this top they were just too small and a bit sad.

I serged the pieces together at the waist, installed cuffs, and voila! Two not-so-happy garments turned into a cute dress!

I really like giving sad clothes make-overs, and this trick is among my favorites. Combining a top with a hem to gain a dress is quick, easy, and rewarding. This dress make-over resulted in a comfy and cute dress with just a bit of edge. I might show this to Mom someday to see whether she remembers the top she gave me, or just serve me the good old “dear lord, what on earth are you wearing”-shriek.

With a seam at the waist, this dress needs a belt to ease out the contrast created by two different kinds of fabric. I like to wear this with an elastic belt, a tight petticoat (the hem flies a bit and it makes me uncomfortable), and small, sparkly bits of jewelry. This dress is basic enough to wear for running errands, and still cute enough to style up for a Friday-night outing.

I hope you’ve enjoyed my dress make-over!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Crinkle Skirt Styles

On Tuesday, I shared a tutorial on how to sew a basic skirt with crinkle fabric. The tutorial is available here. Today we’re going to look at outfits based on the skirt. I really like this skirt, but it turns out that crinkle skirt styles are surprisingly difficult. There’s not that much you can do with a skirt: pairing it up with a top is pretty much it. What affects the outfit most of all is the style of the top. Let’s take a look at how a basic skirt can change.

Office Appropriate

Clean, basic looks are perfect for the office. A cute blouse paired with basic pumps make the crinkle skirt fit for a working environment. Elastic material ensures a comfy fit for the blouse, and puff sleeves add a feminine element to the look.

This outfit is really comfy. The skirt’s wide and long enough to office friendly, and the elasticity of the blouse adds another level to comfort. A fitted blouse stays put, and hides co-cooperatively under a skirt’s waist. Matching pumps and a tidy hairdo make the outfit look polished.

The blouse is made with our Loli Outfit Pattern.

Tight Waist

Basic skirts love corsets. For the second crinkle skirt style, I paired wide hems with a tight corset. Our Reversible Waist Corset has been my favorite for a long time, and it’s starting to show. As I was putting it on, I noted a small tear on the black side. I guess it’s time to make a new one! The corset still has some wear in it, and I decided to go ahead and use it for this look. I wore a green spaghetti strap top under it to give the outfit a bit of color. I got the lace top from H&M a few years back. It’s really comfy and super-cute, I just can’t understand why I didn’t buy a black one, too.

This look is perfect for going out. It’s comfy despite the tight corset, and cool enough to wear at crowded bars. To make it warmer, just wear a mesh top under it, or pop a shrug over it.

Party!

Fall isn’t really the time for parties, but Christmas will be here sooner than you think. This outfit is pretty perfect for a dinner with the family around Yule-time. I paired the crinkle skirt with our Pretty Basic Lace Top, and wore a lace petticoat under the skirt to give it a bit of volume. This skirt would love a poofy petticoat, and I’m thinking about making one with grey organza!

Basic looks can change a great deal though material. Made with jerseys, this would be a “just hanging around the house” -outfit. Crinkle fabric and lace make the style suitable for casual parties and get-togethers.

Winter Is Coming

Days are getting colder, there’s no denying it. I hate being cold, and am most likely the first one to reach for a cardigan. I wanted to incorporate a sweater for the last look to show you that skirts can work during the winter as well. Light layers can surprisingly warm: one winter I went out wearing two long skirts, two long-sleeved Tees, a shrug, two layers of socks and a coat, and I was hot though it was -30 degrees celsius!

For this look, I paired the crinkle skirt with a spaghetti strap top, my blood stain corselet, and our Cropped Pullover.

This sweater is my favorite one ever. I love this particular shade of orange, the raglan shape is cute and comfy, and the collar turned out just right. The shape of the hem, though, is the thing that’s most unusual about this design. The front hem curves up, and the back hem falls lower to reach the waist. This cropped sweater it worked top down, and despite the non-traditional shape, it’s really easy to knit. This sweater is available in three variations: ribbed and smooth in one pattern, and cabled in another.

This outfit is again something I am very likely to wear during the coming winter. The sweater is really cute and works well with the skirt and corset. The crinkle skirt looks nice, is comfy, and worn over a Garter Petticoat, will be warm enough for winter.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about our crinkle skirt styles.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather