Hitched Hems

Dresses are my favorite things to wear. They’re easy to mix and match, and never out of place. Styles to choose from are endless, and materials used vary from cotton to velvet to leather. Personally, I like dresses that are both versatile and classic. One of my favorite designs in our collection is The Princess and Keyhole Dress. It features puff-sleeves, a keyhole neck, and hitched hems.

princess-seamed dress, one

The Princess and Keyhole Dress is best made with non-elastic materials such as cotton. The dress has princess seams, so it’s shaped at the bodice, and a wide hem. Puff-sleeves make it comfy to wear, but the key element is the hem.

The dress is made with channels on the hem’s seams. With ribbons slid into the channels, the hem can be modified in both length and shape. The dress can be worn long, pulled up at the front, or gathered into a short version. I like to use the ribbons to shorten the hem at the front to show off a colorful peticoat.

The shape of the dress finds its origin in the Victorian era, when hems were wide, ruffled, and often gathered. I’ve used the element of hitched hems in an earlier design as well.

princess-seamed dress, four

The Victorian Skirt is made with two layers. The botton layer features a wide ruffle, and the upper layer can be hitched up with ribbons. The Victorian Skirt is made with a very simple pattern, so it’s available as a drafting tutorial only. This allows everyone to create a skirt with their own, unique measurements.
Hitched hems are an easy way to create a versatile dress. The Victorian Skirt can be worn with both layers smooth and long, pulled up evenly, gathered at the front, or even arranged into a bustle-like shape. I like to wear mine gathered evenly, and I’ve even made a version with ribbon channels on both layers of the skirt.

black satin skirt, Victorian style

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about our Hitched Hems -sewing patterns.

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Black and White Gloves

Every autumn, I decide to need a new pair of basic gloves. I usually only wear black ones though I’ve made a pair in red, another in black and blue, and one in sunny yellow. The latest finished ones are black and white gloves.

I used a basic glove pattern I have memorized for these ones. The gloves have an Indian thumb gusset, which is one of my favorite techniques. The gusset is super-easy to work, and since it follows the shape of the palm, it makes gloves really comfy to wear. I’ve incorporated the Indian thumb gusset into one pattern I’ve made. The What to do With the Rest Mitts is a free pattern for fingerless gloves, and it can be found here on Ravelry, and here in our own store.

Looking around the internet, I noted that knitting pattern for basic gloves are relatively scarce. Harry Wells has written a free pattern, which can be found on Ravelry, but it features a different kind of thumb gusset. The pattern’s quite good, though, and I highly recommend it.

To spruce up my basic gloves, I decided to make them stripy. I had black and white yarns stashed, and though I know the white will turn gray pretty soon, I chose to risk it. Neutral colors won’t clash with anything, so if I’m feeling very adventurous, I might pair the gloves with an outfit splashed with red or purple.

The hand of the gloves is worked with single-row stripes. On the cuffs, I went with wider rows. This way, the gloves have a bit more going on. Thinner and wider stripes create an interesting surface even when worked with only two tones.

After finishing the gloves, I still had some yarn left. In order to get rid of some of it, I crocheted six small flowers. I sewed them onto the gloves, three on each, and found myself very happy with the choice.

Gloves are often left plain, mainly because heavy embellishments tend to get caught on sleeves and bags and passers-by. Light decorations, though, are sometimes a nice way to give a little more oomph to gloves and mittens.

I hope you enjoyed reading about my Black and White Gloves!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

Pink Cthulhu

For me, Tuesday was one of those days when you’re feeling a bit under the weather. To lift my spirits, I went through my stash to find a cute yarn to crochet something quick and easy with, I came out with pink cotton, and decided I wanted to make another Cthulhu to keep company to the green one I’d made before.

I know these guys are usually green, but who knows, maybe this Elder God happened upon a mysterious mutation of Upgrade Cuteness Level to the Max.

Amigurumis are still an area not-that-well-known to me. I know the basics, naturally, but still need patterns in order to work a design with more details.

Early last year, I crocheted a green Cthulhu with the help of Rural Rebellion’s pattern. As I searched for it today, I noted that their website had been taken down. After a bit of searching, I found the pattern I’d used before. It can be found here, but I don’t know if the link will be live for long.

I really like the pattern, it’s well-written and clear, and I sincerely hope the website will be renewed soon.

For the pink Cthulhu, I used two strands of pink upcycled cotton. It’s a really light shade of pink which reminds me of cotton candy. The tone is pretty, but when I try to imagine the yarn as a garment, something hurts and says NO. For amigurumis, though, it’s pretty perfect.

I cast the Cthulhu on at around 1pm, and cast off at around 9pm. I took breaks to do a bit of work and to say bye to the better half who went off on a business trip, and to cook dinner for myself. Working on the Cthulhu took, to my reckoning, about five hours.

The finished product created using a 5mm (US8) hook is about 13 cm high. The Cthulhu has curling tentacles, which were really fun to work with, and wings attached to its back.

For the eyes, I used black plastic buttons. I sewed them on while working on the head, so I could still easily reach the inside of the work.

I really like the way the Pink Cthulhu turned out. Though the color is a bit unconventional. I think it adds to the original design’s chubby cuteness.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about my Pink Cthulhu!

Until next time.

Love,

Heather

SneakPeaks and Mailing List News

It’s new year, and I truly hope yours got off to a better start than mine. We had a bit of a disaster with our website, had to resort to a backup which dated to last July, and lost all blog post from the past six months in the process. Things could be a lot worse, though, so I shall take this as an opportunity to grow and learn.

Learn to update backups every once and again, that is.

To kick-off the new year (a bit late), we are launching a newsletter. Starting on Feb 3rd, if the sky doesn’t fall on us, we’ll be sending out weekly notes including news on our current mishaps going-ons, and info and special offers on fresh products. Our blog will be following along the lines of our newsletter, but by joining our mailing list, you’ll have access to discount codes and other offers. In other words, by ordering our newsletter, you’ll be making yourself a VIP.

Upon joining, you’ll also receive a little present: a discount code to be used here at heatherwielding.com. The coupon will get you 20% off on one product of your choosing, and you can spend it anytime. The coupon won’t expire, so feel free to save it for later.

You can join up here, or by filling out the box on the sidebar.

During the next few weeks, I hope, we’ll be launching new products as well. A super-easy, super-cute jersey dress will probably be first. I’m thinking about creating more dress styles with viscose jersey, just because they’re so easy and comfy to wear. These will most likely become a part of our Pretty Basic styles.

We also have a knitting pattern on the way. The pattern needs proof-reading, and it will be sent out to be tested soon. Naming the pattern took a long, long time, and I only came up with the name three nights ago. These intricate gloves are called Lovelace. They will soon be followed by a sister-pattern called Purlace.

I’ve also been working on something a bit more challenging. I had a bit of red wool fabric stashed, and a bit of lace, and together, they wanted to be…

Well, I’ll tell you more about that later.

I hope you all have had a lovely beginning of the year.

Until next time!

Love,

Heather